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The Foster Parent Handbook 
 
For 
 
The Foster and Adoptive Families Of Louisiana	
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 	
 
 
 
 
 	
Louisiana Office of Community Services 	
Baton Rouge, Louisiana  February 1981   	
April 2009 
Replacing December 2007 	
 
 
 
 
 
 
  To access this handbook	
 on the internet, go to  http://www.dss.state.la.us	 . 
Under the O ffices heading, click of the words, “ DSS Policies”.   
This will bring you to the DSS Policy Management System web page. 
Click the OCS tab near the top of the page.   
Under the C hapters heading on the left of the pa ge, click on Foster Parent Handbook.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 1. Introduction to Foster Care 
Section No./Name Introduction to Foster Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2009 
Replacing December 2007 	
 
 
 	
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
TITLE                PAGE NUMBER 
 
PART 1 INTRODUCTION TO FOSTER CARE 
 
 A Overview ........................................................................\
................................. .1-1 
  B.  What is Fo ster Care ........................................................................\
................. .1-1 
 C. Laws Governing Fost er Care Program ............................................................ .1-1 
  D.  Ways A Child Comes  Into Foster Care ...........................................................  1-2 
 E. Legal Requirement  for Confidentiality...........................................................  1-2 
 
PART 2 PLACEMENT OF A FOSTER CHILD IN YOUR HOME 
 
  A.  Selecting a Placemen t.………………………………………………………...2-1 
  B.  Meeting Your Ne w Foster Child .....................................................................  2-1 
  C.  Child’s Name ........................................................................\
..........................  2-2 
  D.  House Rules ........................................................................\
............................  2-2 
 E  Family Safe ty Rules ........................................................................\
................  2-4 
 
PART 3 LIVING WITH A FOSTER CHILD 
 
  A   Special Characteristics………………………………………………………..3-1 
  B.  Concerns of Foster Children ........................................................................\
...  3-2 
  C  Issues for all Fo ster Children ........................................................................\
..  3-2 
 D  Accepting th e Child........................................................................\
.................  3-5 
  E   Separation and the Gr ieving Process ...............................................................  3-6 
  F.  Impact on the Biological  Parents/Caretakers ..................................................  3-9 
 G. Universal Pr ecautions........................................................................\
..............  3-10 
 H. Parenting the Sexually  Abused Child..............................................................  3-11 
  I.  Allegations of Abus e and/or Neglect ..............................................................  3-13 
  J.  Runaway, Missing or Kidn apped Foster Child ...............................................  3-14 
 K. Day Ca re ........................................................................\
.................................  3-14 
 L Religious Acti vities ........................................................................\
.................  3-14 
 M. Managing Telephone  Calls and Mail ..............................................................  3-14 
  N.  Information to be Shared  with the Child’s Worker .........................................  3-15 
  O.  Emergency Planning ........................................................................\
...............  3-16 
  P.  Adoption of a Fo ster Child........................................................................\
......  3-16 
  Q.  When a Foster  Child Leaves........................................................................\
...  3-17 
 
PART 4 DISCIPLINE 
 
  A. Methods........................................................................\
...................................  4-1 
 B. Inappropriate Method s of Discipline...............................................................  4-1 
 C. Increase Positive/Wa nted Behaviors ...............................................................  4-2 
 D. Decrease/Stop Negative/ Unwanted Behaviors ................................................  4-3 
 E. Time-Out. ........................................................................\
................................  4-4 
 F Rewards........................................................................\
...................................  4-5 
 G. Guides to Achieve  Positive Discipline ............................................................  4-5 
  H.  Do’s and Don’ts of Parenting Chart ................................................................  4-6

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 1. Introduction to Foster Care 
Section No./Name Introduction to Foster Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2009 
Replacing December 2007 	
 
 
 
PART 5 HEALTH CARE 
 
 A. Treatment Re
sponsibility ........................................................................\
........ 5-1 
  B.  Communication of Known Health Problems .................................................. 5-1 
 C. Physician Choice ........................................................................\
..................... 5-1 
 D. Medical Care /Forms/Record ........................................................................\
... 5-1 
 E. Eye and Dent al Services........................................................................\
.......... 5-2 
 F. Emergency Treatment ........................................................................\
............. 5-2 
 G. Payment Responsibility ........................................................................\
........... 5-3 
 H. Medical Supplies  and Medications.................................................................. 5-3 
 I. Mental Hea lth Services ........................................................................\
........... 5-3 
 
PART 6 SCHOOL 
 
  A.  Laws to Help a Child in School ...................................................................... 6-1 
  B.  Guidelines to Help Foster Parents with Child’s Education ............................. 6-2 
  C.  School Responsibilities:  Fost er Care Worker/Foster Parent .......................... 6-3 
 D. Educational Services ........................................................................\
............... 6-3 
 E. School Supplies ........................................................................\
....................... 6-4 
 
PART 7 ADOLESCENTS 
 
  A.  Foster Parenting the Adolescent...................................................................... 7-1 
 B. Driving ........................................................................\
.................................... 7-2 
 C. Employment ........................................................................\
............................ 7-2 
 D. Dating........................................................................\
...................................... 7-3 
 E. Educational/Vocational Needs ........................................................................\
 7-3 
  F.  Planning for Independent Living..................................................................... 7-4 
  G.  Planning for High School Graduation ............................................................. 7-4 
  H.  Planning for College /Vocational Training ...................................................... 7-4 
 
PART 8 LIFEBOOKS 
 
  A.  Reasons a Child N eeds a Life Book ................................................................ 8-1 
  B.  Developing a Life Book ........................................................................\
.......... 8-1 
 
PART 9 RESPONSIBILITIES AS TEAM MEMBERS 
 
  A.  Working Together:  The Partnership Between the Foster Parents, OCS  
                                                     and the birth parents ..................................................... .... 9-1 
  B.  Role and Responsibilities  of Foster Parents .................................................... 9-1 
  C.  Role and Responsibilities of  Foster Care Workers.......................................... 9-2 
 D. Responsibilities of  Biological Parents............................................................. 9-4 
 E. Permanency Planning ........................................................................\
.............. 9-4 
 F. Concurrent Planning........................................................................\
................ 9-5 
 G. Case Planni ng Process........................................................................\
............. 9-5 
 H. Family Team Conferences (FTC).................................................................... 9-5 
 I. Court Hearings ........................................................................\
........................ 9-5 
  J.  Visits Between  Child  with Family Members ................................................. 9-6 
  K.  Visits Between  Foster Care  Worker, Child and Foster Parent ....................... 9-7 
 L. Volunteer and Vi siting Resources ................................................................... 9-7 
  M.  Court Appointed Speci al Advocate (CASA)................................................... 9-7

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 1. Introduction to Foster Care 
Section No./Name Introduction to Foster Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2009 
Replacing December 2007 	
 
 
 
PART 10 ISSUES PERTINENT TO FOSTER PARENTS 
 
  A.  Minimum Standards for Foster 
and Adoptive Family Homes ........................ 10-1 
 B. Re-certification........................................................................\
........................ 10-1 
 C. In-Service  Training ........................................................................\
................. 10-2 
 D. Foster Parent  Identification ........................................................................\
..... 10-3 
 E. Respite and Alternativ e Child Care Plan......................................................... 10-3 
 F. Liability In surance ........................................................................\
.................. 10-3 
 G. Homeowner Insurance ........................................................................\
............ 10-4 
 H. Automobile Insurance ........................................................................\
............. 10-4 
  I.  Filing a Claim........................................................................\
.......................... 10-4 
  J.  Address and Househol d Composition Change ................................................ 10-5 
 K. Problem Resolution ........................................................................\
................. 10-5 
 L. Fair Hearing ........................................................................\
............................ 10-5 
  M.  Notice of Right to Request a Fair H earing ...................................................... 10-6 
  N.  Time Limit to Request  a Fair Hearing............................................................. 10-6 
  O.  Internal Revenue Se rvice Regulations ............................................................ 10-8 
 
PART 11 REIMBURSEMENT 
 
 A. Expenditure Reimbur sement Process .............................................................. 11-1 
 B. Board Payment ........................................................................\
........................ 11-1 
 C. Special Board Payment ........................................................................\
........... 11-3 
 D. Clothes ........................................................................\
.................................... 11-3 
 E. Allowances ........................................................................\
.............................. 11-3 
 F. Gift Allowance ........................................................................\
........................ 11-4 
 G. Transporting Children ........................................................................\
............. 11-4 
 H. Vacations an d Travel........................................................................\
............... 11-5 
  I.  Socialization and Deve lopmental Activities ................................................... 11-5 
 J. Miscellaneous  Expenditures........................................................................\
.... 11-6 
 
PART 12 FOSTER PARENT SUPPORT SYSTEMS 
 
 A. Foster Parent  Association........................................................................\
........ 12- 1 
 B. Family Resour ce Centers ........................................................................\
........ 12- 1 
 C Louisiana Advocacy  Support Team ................................................................ 12- 1 
 
APPENDIX 
 
  A.  All of Rights for Foster Children 
  B.  National Foster Parent Association Code of Ethics 
 C. Remember to Ask 
  D.  When to Call a Worker 
  E.  Children’s Developmental Milestones 
 F. Immunization Schedule 
 G. Information Assistance 
 H. Forms 
 I. References 
  J.  Louisiana Foster Parent Bill of Rights

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 1. Introduction to Foster Care 
Section No./Name Introduction to Foster Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 1 	
  
 
PART 1 – INTRODUCTION TO FOSTER CARE 
 
A.  OVERVIEW 
 
This handbook was developed for foster parents as 
a resource tool to provide general information 
regarding the Louisiana Fo ster Care Program.  As changes in po licy and procedures are made you will 
be advised by your worker.   
 
For convenience, the pronoun “he” has been used thr oughout the handbook in referring to a foster child 
(inclusive of the male and female gender). 
  
The term “Agency” is used for the Office of Community Services. 
 
The Office of Community Services, most commonly referred to as OCS, falls under the direction of the 
Department of Social Services.   The State is divided into OCS re gional offices, under which fall local 
parish offices.  You will be working with persons fr om your local parish office and/or regional office.  
The State Office of OCS, which is Admi nistration, is located in Baton Rouge. 
 
We hope this handbook will be fully read and used by foster  parents, and that it will contribute to quality 
care for children served in  the foster home program.  Th is handbook is yours to keep.  
 
B.  WHAT IS FOSTER CARE 
 
Foster care is a planned, goal-directed protective  service for children and their parents who must live 
apart because of child abuse, neglect or special fa mily circumstances requiring the need for out-of-home 
care.  Foster care services are intended to provide temporary care for a child until he is reunited with his 
family or until another permanent living situation is provided. 
 
The goal of the foster care program is  to maintain the child in a safe environment, which is supportive of 
his development.  It is to also  assist his parents in resuming respons ibility and custody or to attain an 
alternative permanent placement for the child as soon as possible. 
 
C.  LAWS GOVERNING FOSTER CARE PROGRAM 
 
There are laws that govern the care  of and accountability for children in need of care.  Louisiana law 
provides the “Department of Social Services the responsibility to administer and supervise all child 
welfare activities relating to children who are depende nt, neglected, delinquent or physically or mentally 
handicapped;….”  	
Louisiana Revised Statue 46:51 (8)	 
 
Louisiana law also provides that “the Office of Co mmunity Services shall provide for the public child 
welfare functions of the state, in cluding but not limited to….making pe rmanent plans for foster children 
and meeting their daily maintenance needs of f ood, shelter, clothing, necessary physical/medical 
services, school supplies, and  incidental personal needs;…”  	
 Louisiana Revised Statue 36:477C

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 1. Introduction to Foster Care 
Section No./Name Introduction to Foster Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 2 	
  
 
The policies and procedures of the Office of Community Services ar
e designed to assure compliance 
with all Federal and State Laws and regulations  governing foster care as it applies to the safety, 
permanency and well-being of children placed within foster care.  
 
D.  WAYS A CHILD MAY CO ME INTO FOSTER CARE 
 
• Instanter Order  
An emergency order given by the court to secure the protection of a  child(ren) that is at risk of 
harm as a result of child abuse and/or neglect.  It provides temporary custody of the child 
pending a Continued Custody Hearing.  This heari ng is held within three days of the child 
entering foster care with the i ssuance of the Instanter Order. 
 
•  Custody Order  
An order given by the court that places custody  of the child with the agency following a court 
hearing.  It is temporary  and can be changed at the  discretion of the court. 
 
•  Voluntary Agreement  
An agreement between the biological parent (per  the parent’s request) and the agency to provide 
foster care services for the child for a specified  period of time due to the parent’s inability to 
provide parental care.  This agreement is temporary and rarely used. 
 
•  Acts of Surrender  
A voluntary or involuntary  legal act by the legal and/or biol ogical parent(s) that terminates 
his/her parental responsibili ties and rights to the child. 
 
E.  LEGAL REQUIRMENTS FOR CONFIDENTIALITY 
 
Louisiana law, Revised Statute 46:5 6, provides “information concerning  clients of the agency shall be 
confidential.  Therefore, information regarding childre n in foster care and their biological families must 
be held in confidence by all concer ned.”  Penalty for violation of provi sions of Louisiana Revised Statue 
46:56 is a maximum penalty of a $2,500  fine or two years in parish prison or both; not less than $500 or 
ninety days on each count. 
 
As foster parents, you are provided personal and conf idential information regarding the child placed in 
your home, to assist you in caring for the child.  A ny and all personal information about the child, his 
family and his situation (reason for entering foster care) that has been  shared with you should be treated 
in a confidential manner.  This helps to assure the child and his family’s privacy.  This information 
should only be shared with the ch ild’s treating physicians, therapists, CASA, attorney, teachers and 
some of the child’s caretakers, as  necessary, to meet the needs of the child.  This information cannot be 
disclosed to relatives, friends or neighbors.  Fost er parents are not allowed to permit any newspaper, 
magazine, other print or television media to take phot ographs that identify children in care without the 
permission of OCS.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 1. Introduction to Foster Care 
Section No./Name Introduction to Foster Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 3 	
  
 
The child may share information with you that is unknow
n to OCS.  As a foster parent, you must share 
this information with the child’s OCS worker as  it will assist the agency in providing appropriate 
services to the child.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 2. Placement Of A Foster
 Child In Your Home 
Section No./Name Placement Of A Foster Child In Your Home 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 4 	
 
 
PART 2 – PLACEMENT OF A 
FOSTER CHILD IN YOUR HOME 
 
A.  SELECTING A PLACEMENT 
 
When placement outside of the child’s family home  is needed, the first decision made is whether there 
are relatives with whom the child may live; and if not,  what type of placement will be most appropriate.  
In most situations, the progression of  consideration in the selection begins with a non-custodial parent 
and relative resource and moves to family foster care.   The foster child is to be placed in the least 
restrictive (most family-like), most appropriate setti ng available and in close proximity to the parent’s 
home.  Children should be placed in their home parish  or an adjoining parish unless there is a clear and 
compelling reason to place at a distance from their own families.  
 
The best interest and special needs of the child s hould be considered when selecting a placement.  In 
selecting a home for a child, there are other areas to consider, such as the child’s age, stage of 
development, any special needs or  problems the child may have, health and schooling needs, as well as 
whether or not he has siblings w ho should or should not be placed in  the same home.  These factors are 
then compared with the available foster homes capable  of meeting those specified needs.  The final step 
is to determine which of the currently available fo ster homes are most appropriate for the child.   
 
B.  MEETING YOUR NE W FOSTER CHILDREN 
 
A child has a feeling of loss due to  separation from birth parents, careta kers, relatives, friends and home.  
Often the child has had little, if any, time to prep are for the move and placement in your home.  The 
child may have feelings of guilt,  rejection, loneliness, anger and frustration over having his life 
disrupted. 
 
You should have special things in mind to do when a foster child is placed in your home.  There are a 
number of actions you can take to ease the child’s  placement in your home and to establish a framework 
for caring and helping the child.  Me eting with your new foster child will probably be exciting for you 
and frightening for him.  You are mee ting this child during one of the most traumatic periods of his life.   
This initial meeting is part of the  trauma because it signifies more loss  and change.  It is helpful to put 
yourself in your foster child’s plac e.  Making a foster child’s first few days in your home as comfortable 
as possible for him may mean an easier adjustment to  foster care and your family’s ways.  The child’s 
previous life style may have been different.  When  a child is first placed in your home the following 
should be done immediately with follow-up b ecause the child may not remember everything.  
 
• Offer physical comfort to the child (if appropriate ), talk little and accept the feelings that the 
child may have. 
•  Show a new child around your home immediately. 
•  Let the child know that he can come to you for he lp or to discuss anything, that if you cannot 
answer or help, you will help fi nd someone who can.  You may want to give the child a special 
code, or signal for him to use if he has somethi ng very important or urgent to tell you.  The child 
is not to be told that statements and actions in  the foster home are not to be shared with people

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 2. Placement Of A Foster
 Child In Your Home 
Section No./Name Placement Of A Foster Child In Your Home 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 5 	
 
 	
outside the foster family.  The child may have be
en in an environment where he was required to 
maintain secrecy about their family. 
•  Have and point out nightlights in  child’s room and bathroom. 
•  Show the child where personal items are kept  in the bathroom such as, the child’s new 
toothbrush, toothpaste, towels, washcloths, toilet paper, etc. 
•  Show the child his bed, closet space and drawers; help child hang up clothes, put away clothes in 
drawers, if he needs and/or wants help. 
•  Point out child’s play space. 
•  You should not celebrate his arriva l by inviting interested friends and relatives over for a look at 
him.  Remember, he is sad and hurting inside,  and may be confused and self-conscious.  The 
foster child does not want to be  put on display or to see if he meets the approval of your friends 
or relatives. 
•  The foster child needs the security of a regular ly scheduled day.  Regular playtime, naptime and 
mealtime for young children are important.  A regular schedule is necessary for all foster 
children.   
 
C.  CHILD’S NAME 
 
When a child is initially placed in your home, th e following question may be on your mind:  What name 
should the foster child use?  For legal purposes and most importantly for his identity, it is necessary that 
the foster child be recognized by  his own name.  He should not assume  the name of the foster parents.  
Sometimes children have a need to belong and to not  be different; therefore, they ask about calling 
themselves by your name.  It is impor tant at such times to talk with the child, recognizing his need to 
belong to a family, but explaining his foster care placement is tempor ary.  Do not support or encourage 
the child to change his name.  Generally, changing a  child’s name or using another name in your home 
conveys rejection of the child and  will elicit distrust and perhaps anger from his biological family.  
Discuss this with the child in such a way that he  does not feel that you are rejecting him. The child’s 
worker should be told of the child’s desire to a ssume the foster parent’s name.  Remember, before 
people ask, it is a good idea to practice with the child  his “responses to questions” about why his name is 
different. 
 
D.  HOUSE RULES 
 
When a foster child enters your home,  he should be provided with some basic in formation regarding the 
family’s house rules.  The following  basic rules are important and should be  discussed with each child: 
 
Safety:   Inform the child that while he is in your hom e, you will keep him safe.  Tell the child that in 
your home if he is afraid or feels anxious about some thing, he needs to tell you so together you can 
discuss his feelings and decide what can make hi m feel better.  Don’t assume the child knows basic 
personal or general safety rules;  review and explain safety rules. 
 
Privacy:   Knock when a door is closed.   Everyone has a right to privacy.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Part 2. Placement Of  A Fo
ster Child In Your Home 
Section No./Name Placement Of A Foster Child In Your Home 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 6 	
 
 
Clothing:
  Unless in the privacy of your bedroom or the bathroom , no one in the family should be in 
underwear or pajamas without a robe. 
 
Touching:   No one touches anothe r person without permission. 
 
Wrestling and Tickling:  These are normal childhood behaviors wh ich can take on sexual and abusive 
overtones.  They are often painful, uncomfortable  or humiliating for the weaker person, and should be 
limited. 
 
Bedrooms:   Children, over the age of  six, of opposite sex are not to sh are a bedroom.  Sexually abused 
children of any age should not be allowed to get in  bed with the foster parents, other adults or other 
children.  It may be over stimulatin g to them, and they may interpret cuddling as sexual advances.  All 
foster children must have their own bed. 
 
Name:   Discuss with the child and help him decide wh at he would like to call you.  Requiring the child 
to call you mom and dad may be stressful for the child du e to his emotional attachment to his parents.   
 
Remember, behaviors and actions expected of a child are best learned by you setting a good example.  
The following are examples of  house rules that should be discussed with  the child and then posted in a 
central area (e.g., refrigerator, door, etc.): 
• I am here to protect and keep you safe. 
•  We are polite to one another. 
•  We clean up our messes. 
•  We don’t hit or throw things. 
•  We are honest. 
•  We talk out our problems. 
•  We don’t yell. 
 
There are usually understood and/or  unspoken rules of the family; however, these rules need to be 
discussed with the foster child.  For example: 
• Should he need you during the night, just call and you will come to him; 
•  When and if he can have snacks and drinks; 
•  Can he eat in any room or ju st the kitchen or dining area; 
•  When can he watch television; 
•  When is bed time; 
•  When is bath time; 
•  Is he expected to bath everyday; 
•  Is everyone expected to eat dinner together; 
•  When can he go outside; 
•  Who washes his clothes; 
•  Are clean bath towels and washcloths used everyday; 
•  Where does he put dirty clothes;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Part 2. Placement Of  A Fo
ster Child In Your Home 
Section No./Name Placement Of A Foster Child In Your Home 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 7 	
 
 	
• 
When/if a room is off limits and why (e.g., parent(s) bedroom, formal living room); 
•  When are allowances given – each board payment  includes an allowance for the foster child; and 
•  When can he use the computer and video games. 
 
Your family may have some additional “understood rule s” which need to be shared when a new child is 
placed in your home. 
 
E.  FAMILY SAFETY RULES 
 
The following is a list of suggested rules designed to  keep everyone safe in this family.   Included are 
rules for living together safely, respecting the rights  of others, and ensuring the personal safety of 
everyone.  The rules should first be discussed with the  foster child to determine if they are different from 
what he is accustomed to.  In situations where the  child(ren) repeatedly breaks certain rules, these rules 
can be put in writing as a contract.   The contract should be age appropr iate and signed by the foster child 
and the foster parent(s).   The child’s signature on  the bottom of the contract  acknowledges that the rules 
have been discussed with the child, he understands th e rules, he will follow the rules, and he will help 
other children in the family to follow these rules.   
 
The suggested rules are as follow: 
 
• I understand that before I go into another person’s bedroom, I must get permission first. 
•  I understand that if no one is home to give me  permission, I am not to go into another person’s 
bedroom. 
•  I understand that when visiting another  person’s bedroom, the door must be open. 
•  I understand that if someone is visiti ng my bedroom, the door must be open. 
•  I understand that if my foster  parent(s) talk with me in my bedroom, the door must be open. 
•  I understand that undressing is a llowed only in my bedroom and in  the bathroom with the door 
closed. 
•  If the door is closed, I understand  that there is to be only one person in the bathroom.  Specific 
exceptions to this item are as follows: ______________________________________________. 
•  I understand that everyone  sleeps in his own bed. 
•  I understand that child ren do not sleep in the same bedroom with the foster parents. 
•  I understand that if I am six years of age or olde r, I will not share a bedroom with a person of the 
opposite sex. 
•  I understand there is to be no se xual play or sexual touching and that includes playing doctor, 
nurse or things like that. 
•  I understand that all inappropriate sexualized  language and/or behaviors (references to body 
parts, sexual activity, back rubs, foot tickling, wr estling, “horseplay”, etc.) will not be permitted. 
•  I understand that I will not have access to or  bring into the home any inappropriate sexually 
oriented materials (books, pictures, magazines, vi deos, internet access, etc.) other than that which 
is used for the purpose of appropr iate sex education as agreed to by my case worker and foster 
parent(s).

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Part 2. Placement Of  A Fo
ster Child In Your Home 
Section No./Name Placement Of A Foster Child In Your Home 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 8 	
 
 	
• 
I understand there is to be no mast urbation in front of other people. 
•  I understand that if someone sexua lly touches me inappropriately, I will tell the foster parents 
and my worker.  Other people I can  tell to get help are my doctor, teacher, therapist or minister.  
I will continue to tell until someone belie ves me and helps stop the sexual touching. 
•  I will obey these rules of privacy (not touching a nother’s private parts, purses, notebooks, private 
notes, diaries, mail, etc.). 
•  I understand that if someone disciplines me in a  physical manner, such as hitting or spanking, I 
will tell my case worker and foster parent(s). 
•  I understand that any plans for me to baby sit in  or outside the home must be discussed with and 
approved by my worker. 
•  I understand that I am respons ible for obeying these rules. 
•  I understand that I am responsib le if I break these rules. 
•  I understand thes e rules clearly.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 9 	
 
 
PART 3 – LIVING WI
TH A FOSTER CHILD 
 
A.  SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS 
 
Living with a foster child can be different from ot her children.  Allow time for adjustment for you, your 
family and especially the foster ch ild.  It is understandable if you feel guilty,  disappointed or take it 
personally if you and your foster child are not get ting along well at the beginning of the placement. 
 
Foster children usually have some ch aracteristics related to the things that have happened to them.  Their 
behavior may seem extreme; they may be withdr awn, shy, boisterous, rowdy, or overly sensitive and 
destructive.  As a result  of certain situations, their development may be delayed. 
 
The foster child may have lived in an environmen t with many problems.  He has learned to behave 
according to the way he has been treated.  If he has h eard only yelling, then he tends to yell.  If people in 
his family have fought, then he knows that by react ing in an aggressive manner he will get what he 
wants.  A child mimics and copies the  behavior of the adults in his life. 
 
Some pretty bad things can happen  in a child’s life, such as abandonment, abuse and rejection.  The 
separation from his family and placement in a foster home can be very traumatic.  No one can predict 
how he will react to the traumatic events that br ought him into foster care.  He may react by being 
especially compliant at the beginni ng of the placement, which is often called the “honeymoon” period. 
 
Another type of initial reaction is  the “trying out” period.  During th is period of time, the child may 
exhibit trying behaviors such as  not liking your home, his new school, your childr en or the food you 
prepare. There are many reasons for his behavior.  He  may want to see if you really will like him.  He 
may also feel that if he is so bad that you cannot sta nd him, he will be sent back to his family.  The child 
needs warm concern and honest discussion of his actio ns, considering his behavior as inappropriate, not 
him.  He needs to know you care about him and are committed to him. 
 
A child might be a bed wetter.  It will help to be prepared by having the bed protected, to leave a night 
light on, and to offer to wake th e child and accompany him to the bath room.  If the problem persists, 
discuss it with your child’s worker, as the child ma y need medical testing.  Other characteristics and 
problems a foster child may exhibit are lying, steal ing, fighting and running away.  The child’s OCS 
worker will be available to  discuss these problems with you. 
 
A foster child has feelings that may be different from  other children.  Some are feelings of not belonging 
in your home, having a different name  from yours and having two sets of parents.  He may feel torn 
between his own family and your family.  The foster chil d also differs from your child in that he sees his 
parents only by special appointment and has involvement  with a social worker.  All of these issues will 
impact the child’s behavior and adjustment in your home.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 10 	
 
 
B.  CONCERNS OF FOSTER CHILDREN
 
 
Current and former foster children have shared some  of their feelings and concerns regarding their 
personal experiences in foster care placements.  We have included a list of common feelings and 
concerns to help increase your awar eness so you can make the foster care experience better for children 
placed in your home.  Some concerns are: 
• Lack of trust between foster child and foster parents; 
•  Lack of communication between foster  children and foster parents; 
•  Telling foster child’s personal information and revea ling they are a foster child to other people;  
•  Abuse in the foster home; 
•  Children of all ages do not get thei r allowances from foster parents; 
•  No privacy in the foster home; 
•  Foster parents treat foster children  differently from their own children; 
•  Foster parents criticize foster child ren and make them feel it is their fault they are in foster care; 
•  Foster parents do not allow foster children to use household items; 
•  Foster parents lack respect for foster children; 
•  Foster parents have the attitude  that most or all foster children are unstable, unruly or a problem 
to society; 
•  Foster parents do not use the board received fo r the foster child towards their care; and 
•  Children are not allowed choices in the food they  eat, the clothes they wear, their worship, the 
way they style their hair, etc. 
 
C.  ISSUES FOR A LL FOSTER CHILDREN 
 
When raising any child, issues arise which all pare nts must address and manage with the child.  In 
addition to all the issues that exist in any parent-child  relationship, there are some specific issues that are 
unique in caring for foster children. 
 
Issue 1   I don’t feel safe.  
 
Bad things can happen in a child’s life, such as abandonment, abuse and rejection.  The resulting 
separation from his family and placement in a foster home can traumatize the child.  The foster children 
often feel alone and without reso urces to help or protect them. 
 
What can you do?  
 
Treat the child with kindness and be patient.  Keep  rules clear and simple and enforce rules in the same 
way every day.  Discuss rules of priv acy and personal space.  Allow the child to meet with and call their 
OCS worker anytime.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 11 	
 
 
Issue 2   How can I trust anyone?
 
 
Many foster children will have conflict in one of the  most basic areas of human experience.  “Can I trust 
you?  Maybe you act nice, treat me we ll, say I am safe and say you care, but the last time I trusted 
someone, I was terribly hurt.” 
 
What can you do?  
 
Adhere to confidentialit y regarding the child.  It is  important to keep private information about the child 
and family to yourself, sharing only what is necessary with those caring for or  treating the child.  Set 
limits on behavior and be fair and c onsistent.  Discuss with the child that you are there to care for him 
and that he can count on you.  Keep rules clear and  simple and enforce rules the same way every day.  
Always treat the child in a consistent, kind manner.  Avoid making  promises you may not be able to 
keep.  Do not say anything unless you have every intention of doing what you say. 
 
Issue 3   I am grieving. 
 
Being separated from biol ogical parents, caregivers, siblings , family, school and friends can be 
overwhelming for the child.  A grieving child may have  little emotional energy to relate to others.  Being 
withdrawn or seeming to be preoccupied or distant in relationships are  common signs of grief. 
 
What can you do?  
 
Try to place yourself in the child’s position of being separated from everything and everyone you have 
known.  Then imagine how you would feel and behave or how you would decide whom to trust or feel 
comfortable and/or safe with.  Provide the child with a stable routine and with opportunities to 
participate in interesting  activities.  Recognize the ch ild’s feelings, but do not dwell on them or try to 
convince the child not to be sad.  Make yourself available.  Make the  child feel welcome in your home.  
Provide a special treat or a special seat at the dinner table.  A llow the child to personalize his room.  
Follow visitation as set in the child’s case plan.  Do  not make negative remarks about the child’s family.  
Refer to the section on the separation  and grieving process in this handbook. 
 
Issue 4   I feel that I am no  good.  I must be worthless. 
 
Having been removed from their parents/caregivers, fo ster children experience feelings of rejection and 
often blame themselves.  They may tr y to protect themselves from further rejection by being critical or 
nasty to adults who reach out to them. 
 
What can you do?  
 
Discuss with the foster child, at their level of unders tanding, the reason for placement in foster care and 
what will happen in the immediate fu ture.  Be caring and do not criticize the child’s family.  Help the 
child form a relationship with a caring adult.  Do not  use corporal punishment or verbal put-downs.  All

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 12 	
 
 
children have something positive about themselves.  
Look for positive ways to praise the child, attend 
school functions, award ceremonies, etc.  Help the child develop hobbies or ar eas of special ability 
where realistic pride can be built.   Do little things that send the message “you are special.”  Make the 
child’s favorite meal or dessert, fix up their room, or  do something extra with the child.  Most of all, 
spend time with the child and partic ipate in activities with the child. 
 
Issue 5   I don’t fit in anywhere!  
 
Foster children have been uprooted from their home s and may have been in other placements.  Life 
keeps changing and they feel  they don’t belong anywhere. 
 
What can you do?  
 
Show the foster child that you are stable, organized an d consistent and that he is an important part of 
your life.  Visit the school with the child and meet  the new teacher.  Talk to the child about plans for 
home, school and activities.  Show, by your planning and interest, that the child  fits into your home and 
you are eager to make your home a pleasant place for him.   Include the foster child in family activities 
and traditions. 
 
Issue 6   You are not my real parent.  I don’t have to do what you say.  
 
Often there is a period of particularly nice behavior  when a foster child enters a new home.  Sooner or 
later the child may begin to test  your authority and challenge your rule s.  Remember that most children 
do this to some degree as they deve lop and become more independent.  
 
What can you do?  
 
Realize the foster child has experienced big disappoi ntments and may be reacting to previous problems 
by challenging you as the curr ent symbol of authority.  Do not take  any challenging behavior personally.  
Stay calm and remind the child the rules must be  obeyed and followed.  By staying calm and being 
consistent and firm, you are sending the important me ssage that the home can be a stable, predictable 
and safe place.  A consistent system that employs  basic principles of behavior management is a good 
way to deal with challenging, negative behavior.  Ta lk to the child’s worker about books you can read, 
ask them for suggestions, talk with the child’s ther apist if they are receiving therapy and review the 
discipline section of this handbook. 
 
Issue 7   I have sexual feelings. 
 
Feelings of a sexual nature occur in various forms  and actions at all ages.  Foster children may have 
been exposed to sexual behavior  at an early age.  These and other factors can combine to create 
increased awareness of and interest in sexual behavior .  As the child may not feel this is something he 
can discuss with you, he may act on these  feelings and will need your guidance.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 13 	
 
 
What can you do?
 
 
Set clear boundaries for behavior of  a sexual nature.  Discourage intense displays of physical affection 
such as kisses on the lips, prolonge d hugging or sitting in adult’s lap.  Set a standard for privacy and 
modesty and have clear guidelines for the child to fo llow.  There are many ways to express love without 
the type of physical contact that can  stir feelings and create conflicts.  Discuss f eelings openly; show the 
child he can ask questions or shar e feelings and will not be punished or his questions be ignored. 
 
Issue 8   I am jealous of your other children,  grandchildren or other people in your life. 
 
The foster child will often feel like a stranger in  your home and may resent the attention you give to 
others.  With a possible history of emotional depriv ation, having been separated from home and possibly 
prior placements, the child may exhibit sens itivity about being slighted or ignored. 
 
What can you do?  
 
Within reason, try to divide your ti me and energy in a fair manner.  Show the child by your actions that 
you care.  Never compare the child to other family  members or children in the neighborhood.  If you 
have other children or grandchildren in the home, en courage some cooperative projects where there is 
group success and everyone receives  praise and recognition.  Be aware of the child’s increased 
sensitivity in this area.  Devel op habits of offering support and atte ntion on a regular basis without the 
child having to seek attention.   Do not exclude the foster child fr om family gatherings, vacations, 
weddings or other family activities if ot her children in the family are attending. 
 
D.  ACCEPTING THE CHILD 
 
A foster child often feels the breakup of his own home was punishment for his “badness.”  In your home 
he may be compelled to repeat beha viors he feels were responsible for his move, in order to see if the 
same thing will happen again.  This can result in an  outburst of behavior problems in the foster care 
placement.  It will help to view unaccep table behavior as unhappiness on his part. 
 
The foster child may have a lot of habits, such  as poor table manners, inappropriate language or poor 
hygiene skills that you will want to help change.  However, the child may have difficulty in changing 
because his habits may be associated with his pare nts’ way of doing things and giving them up totally 
could mean, to him, cutting off memories or wishes  of his parents.  You may have to consider 
compromises in your family while helping the child ad just to your home and family.  Assist the child in 
developing more appropriate social  and living skills.  When addressing inappropriate behaviors or 
manners, dealing with one or two areas at a time,  rather than several may be more successful. 
 
According to Gregory Keck and Regina Kupecky  in “Parenting the Hurt Child: Helping Adoptive 
(Foster) Families Heal and Grow”, the following  facts should be kept in mind as you begin to 
understand parenting the hurt child: 
• Parenting hurt children require s loving patience and clear expectations for improvement;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 14 	
 
 	
• 
Hurt children bring their pain into their new fa milies and share it with much vigor and regularity; 
•  Nuturing will promote growth, development and trust; 
•  Family fun should not be conti ngent upon the child’s behavior; 
•  Parents should expect difficult time s, as well as a reduction of them; 
•  Expectations are more effective and  powerful than dozens of rules; and 
•  Hurt children get better when their pain is s oothed, their anger reduced, their fear quelled, and 
their environment contained. 
 
E.  SEPARATION AND THE GRIEVING PROCESS 
 
Whenever a person is separated from  someone with whom there has been a strong attachment, feelings 
of loss occur.  This loss is expressed through a grievi ng process.  Foster children go through this process 
when separated from their biolog ical parents or caretakers.  When they move from a previous 
placement, they may also grieve.  Since separation  is a part of the foster care experience, an 
understanding of the grieving proce ss is essential for foster parents.  Through this understanding, the 
professional foster parent can help  the foster child express and adjust to his feelings caused by 
separation.  Foster parents will also be able to rec ognize how separation feelings affect the behavior of 
the parents of children in placement.  An awareness of  the grieving process will also help foster parents 
prepare themselves and their family for eventual separation from the foster child. 
 
As a foster parent, understanding th e impact of separation is of utmost importance.  “Any child who is 
compelled for whatever reason to le ave his own home and family and live in foster care, lives through 
an experience filled with pain and terror and  potentially damaging to his personality and normal 
growth.”  This quotation from the article “Place ment from the Child’s Viewpoint” by Leontine Young, 
describes the feelings of a child entering foster care placement.  When a child is placed away from 
home, it has been decided that th e separation will be less damaging th an leaving the child in his own 
home; however, the traumatic expe rience of separation occurs.  It then becomes the mutual 
responsibility of the foster parents and foster care workers to  prevent the separation from becoming 
more harmful than if a child had rema ined in his previous environment. 
 
Crucial to the success of the placeme nt are the attitudes of the foster parents towards the effects of 
separation on the foster child, thei r own family and the biological pare nts.  One concern is the foster 
parent’s responses toward behavior s expressed by foster children and biological parents.  Another issue 
of concern is the foster parent ’s own experiences with separation, how well they can accept the 
temporary nature of foster care, an d their ability to “give up” a child.   There is no painless way to lose 
someone when there has been a strong attachment.  Most people have a solid foundation of good 
emotional health and nurturing relationships which he lp them through the grieving process.  The foster 
child may not have this foundati on and therefore, separation may be a more difficult experience. 
 
The grieving process is the way by which people rec over from the painful experience of separation and 
loss.  It is unhealthy to prevent  someone from grieving.  This is a  difficult, yet necessary, process to 
work through.  It is possible the individual will  stop the grieving process early.  The grieving process 
can have a tremendous impact on a foster child.   Without completing the process, the person cannot

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 15 	
 
 
really become accepting of or adjusted to the loss, a
nd may never be able to deal with their feelings 
about what has happened to them.  Such unresolved i ssues may affect the person’s overall functioning 
and may appear in their daily be havior.  The child’s grieving proc ess may remind foster parents and 
foster care workers of their own personal experiences.   As a professional team, foster parents and foster 
care workers must be careful to prevent their own f eelings, attitudes and needs from influencing and/or 
not allowing the grieving process for the child.   Foster parents and foster care workers have a 
responsibility to assi st the child in the grieving process. 
 
There are five emotional steps in the grieving process:   shock, anger, bargaining, despair and 
acceptance.   Foster parents need to be prepared for th e various types of behavior the foster child will 
present as he moves through these stages.  Some pe ople move forward and backward between steps,  
improving then regressing, during the grie ving process.  It is a responsibility of the foster parent to help 
the child through this process.   
 
The length of time a child takes to m ove through these stages varies.  It may take a foster child up to six 
months or more to complete the grieving process.  The separation an d grieving process that happens in 
foster care is a tough time for ev eryone:  Biological parents maybe di fficult to work with during this 
period and the behavior of the  foster child can be, at the same time, the most difficult. 
 
1. SHOCK  
 
In this stage (step), emotions may seem to be absent  or shallow.  The child may give the appearance of 
feeling no effect from the separation or may just appear to be nu mb.  It is not unusual to find a child 
acting happy.  If the grieving proce ss is not understood, then this behavior will not be recognized as 
inappropriate.  The foster family may mistakenly think the child is happy to be coming into placement.  
This sets up the foster family for a disappointme nt when the “honeymoon” is over.  The honeymoon 
period is a common occurrence in foster care.  The ch ild’s worker may have prepared the foster parents 
for negative behavior the child had been presenting.  Yet, after days or  even weeks in the foster home, 
the child is quiet, conforming and docile. 
 
The foster parents may report the child isn’t doing a ny of the negative things which were shared with 
them.  The child may appear well mannered and eager to  please.  This type of situation is an indication 
that the child is still in the first stage of the grie ving process:  denial that anything bad has happened, and 
denial that separation has become a reality.  This is  the child’s way of defending against the fear “of the 
unknown”. 
 
During this time, the foster parents should allow the ch ild to gradually become familiar with the family’s 
habits and routines.  The child ne eds factual information about his  placement situation, whereabouts of 
parents and siblings and enough contact  with the social worker to begin to be reassured that someone 
from his previous life knows what is happening to him.  The foster parents should keep the child’s OCS 
worker informed of the child’s behavior during this stage.  If this stage of shock persists for more than 
several weeks, it may indicate an emotional disturba nce that warrants medical consultation.  You may

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Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 16 	
 
 
note progress when moving to the ne
xt stage when the child begins to display more emotion and 
response to what has happened to him. 
 
2. ANGER 
 
This stage (step) begins when  the shock of separation is over a nd the child finally realizes the 
implications of living with a new family.  Feelings are no longer repressed, and the child may feel angry 
or anxious, or both.  Thoughts and beha vior may be directed toward the biological parent or caretaker.  
An older child may make an active attempt to cont act the relative by phone calls and/or running away.  
There may even be times where the child may have fa ntasies about his situation as a coping mechanism.  
He may or may not share these fantas ies with the foster parents.   
 
A common attempt to reclaim the lost person is by tel ling stories about his family that are exaggerations, 
distortions, or false.  This situation needs special work between the fost er parent and child’s worker.  As 
a team, they need to determine what is true and fa lse, and how to be supportive to the child so that 
everyone can tell the difference between the reality  and the fantasy.  Correcting a child’s account or 
story about his family can result in increased anger by the child.  Y ou and the child’s worker should 
jointly decide on how and when it’s necessary to addr ess incorrect information.  The foster child may be 
angry at his biological parents for deserting him and act out this a nger by refusing to see them, talk with 
them, or talk about them.  Feeling guilty because  of the anger adds more emotional trauma.  Foster 
children often blame themselves for causing the remova l and placement, and mistakenly believe they are 
being punished for something they said or did.   
 
The age of the child will determine the way anger is  acted out.  The younger child may throw tantrums 
and be destructive.  The adolescent (already in a nor mal developmental stage of rebellion) may refuse to 
obey adults.  This anger stage may  be the most difficult for foster parents.  Those who do not understand 
what the child is going through may  feel the child is unfairly taking out anger on th em despite their great 
efforts to help.  Many placements fail at this stage because the foster family cannot cope with the child’s 
expressions of anger and the fo ster family then feels guilty. 
 
One of the tragedies of foster care  is the child who has been moved from  one foster home to another, in 
an attempt to locate a family who can cope with hi s behavior.  This rejection causes a poor self-image 
and regression so that the child even tually becomes “fixed” in a certain stage.  It is the sensitive and 
understanding foster parent who realizes the child may be angry with  his own parent for giving him up.  
The foster parents need strength and patience to cope  with the child’s need to displace his anger on the 
parental substitute.  The child who is given the message that it is normal to feel angry, and who is helped 
to express his anger in a safe and  appropriate way, can successfully move out of this stage.  Foster 
families can be prepared for this stag e if they talk out their ideas about “okay” ways of expressing anger, 
and share their frustrations  with the child’s worker.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 17 	
 
 
3.   BARGAINING
 
 
In this stage, the child may think or talk about what  could have been done to prevent his separation from 
his family members.  He may suggest that had he not  been bad or had he not upset his parents, they 
would still be a family.  The child may also try to ma ke deals with himself, such as the promise to do 
better if he can be returned home.  During this stag e, it is important to help the child understand that 
placement in foster care was not his fault.   
 
4. DESPAIR  
 
In this stage (step), the child’s feelings are dire cted inward more than outward.  Perhaps he has 
exhausted the energy it takes to act  out angry feelings but, most likely, the child has accepted the reality 
of being placed.   The child has learned that, despite  all his bad behavior, the foster family intends to 
keep him, and returning to where he came from  will not likely occur in the immediate future.  
Depression and hopelessness are common  feelings.  The child may feel disorganized, restless and more 
preoccupied with things than people,  resulting in a marked withdrawal from social contact.  During this 
despair state, it is normal for the child to regress to  behavior characteristics of a stage in his life when 
the world was not such a painful place in which to live. 
 
The child should be encouraged to talk about his f eelings; however, this should not be done by asking 
the child how he feels or what he thinks.  Instea d, comments that he looks sad or upset and is maybe 
thinking about his family and how  much they are missed, are appropria te.  The child should also be 
warmly supported, helped to express  his hurt and have his worries resolved.  Dolls and pictures are good 
methods of helping the younger child  act out his feelings through play, since verbal ability is limited. 
 
5. ACCEPTANCE 
 
This stage (step) completes the grie ving process.  Instead of clinging to the past, refusing to accept the 
present and being fearful of the future, the child show s greater security in the environment.  Because of 
this he functions with more stabi lity and continues to grow emotionall y.  This does not mean that the 
child has stopped thinking of the family he lost.  In  fact, it is important that the child be allowed to 
remember, talk about and have contact with his past;  this may in turn allow the child the opportunity to 
seek new activities and relationships.  
 
F.  IMPACT ON THE BIOL OGICAL PARENTS/CARETAKERS 
 
Although the needs of the foster child  are the primary focus of the foster parents, the needs and feelings 
of the biological parents should not be forgotten.   Placement of their child is a drastic action, confirming 
the parent’s feelings of  guilt and anger which they experienced  as a result of the family breakdown.  
Foster parents must devote extra effort in their cont act with the child’s biological parents in order to 
promote a positive relationship.  It is an error to wa nt to eliminate contact between the child and his 
biological family.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 18 	
 
 
As the primary goal of foster care 
is often family reunification, this goal can be fulfilled only if the 
biological parents are involved in th e child’s placement and the developm ent of a plan for the child.  The 
biological parent’s feelings of guilt or failure may  cause them to be defensive and hostile towards the 
foster family and social worker.   Also, their own particular emoti onal problems such as immaturity, 
substance abuse, or mental illness may compli cate their involvement.  It is only in extreme 
circumstances, such as desertion or severe mental i llness, that the biological parent and his child cannot 
be helped through the grieving pro cess together.  The social worker looks for ways to enable the 
biological parents to improve thei r level of functioning.  The foster  parents provide a secure and 
accepting environment for the child.  Together they  deal with the denying, protesting and despairing 
behavior of the biological parents and  their child, which is part of separation. 
 
One must remember the biological pa rents, too, are experiencing the trauma of separation, and trying to 
deal with the resulting pa in.  Following placement of the child, the biological parents may feel some 
sense of relief.  Being relieved of  responsibility for the child’s day-to-d ay care is often necessary for the 
biological parents to regain control of  their life situation and to work on their problems.  Separation from 
their child triggers the grieving process.  This additio nal pressure further lessens their ability to function 
adequately.  The biological parents must also work  their way through each of those difficult stages, as 
well as, to resolve the problems that  resulted in placement of the child. 
 
With acceptance of their child’s foster care placement,  the biological parents will have more energy for 
working on realistic plans for their future and the ch ild’s future.  The biological family needs to begin 
with a clear understanding of the reasons for the child’s  placement.  If the goal is for the child to be 
returned to the biological family, a plan must be developed which will remove the problems that caused 
the family’s breakdown.  Change is always diffic ult but, with support and guidance, the majority of 
biological parents can improve themselves and their situ ation and be expected to take care of their child. 
 
Foster parents and social workers should be careful not  to expect the impossible of biological parents.  It 
is possible that some biological pare nts will be unable to develop appropriate parenting skills or have a 
physical setting the same as that of  the foster family.  Expectations of the biological parents should be 
limited to a reasonable belief they will be able to  provide a minimum sufficient level of care for their 
child.  A return to even marginally adequate parent s is a better alternative for the child than years in 
foster care. 
 
G.  UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS 
 
Universal precautions is an approach to infection which is based on the premise that “all human blood 
and certain human body fluids are tr eated as if known to be infectious” for HIV and other bloodborne 
pathogens. 
 
Facts About Communicable Diseases  
 
Generally, being in the same room or  touching a sick person usually carries no risk.  In order to decrease 
risk of disease, the following should be practiced:

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Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
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Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
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• 
Good hygiene; 
•  Frequent, careful hand washing; 
•  Wearing of clean clothing; and 
•  Using protective gloves when exposed to body secretions. 
 
Physical health and well-being depend on many fact ors, including good eating habits, exercise, regular 
medical and dental checkups and the  practice of good hygiene on a daily basi s.  In the event of situations 
where probable exposure to bloodborne pathogens  or other human body fluids might occur, good 
infection control procedure—Univer sal Precautions—is necessary.  You, your family and children in 
care can easily maintain a greater de gree of protection from infectious diseases if you use and teach the 
following universal precaution procedures. 
 
What Do  I Do? 
 
• Wash hands regularly and thoroughly with soap a nd warm water (rub your hands vigorously for 
10 to 15 seconds as you wash them), particularly  after toileting, diaper changes, potty training, 
cuts and injuries, coughing and sneezing, before eating a nd before food preparation. 
•  Teach young children to wash their hands caref ully after toileting, coughing and sneezing and 
before eating. 
•  After thorough cleaning,  cover open cuts and injuries with bandages. 
•  Wash toys, stuffed animals, favorite blankets and  things children put in their mouths with soap 
and warm water regularly. 
•  Use disposable gloves when in direct contact with body fluids  that contain blood. 
•  Wash surface areas, clothing, bed linen and laundry  exposed to body fluids (blood, urine, feces, 
vomit, secretions).  Use a house hold disinfectant or mild bleach  solution – one cup of bleach to 
nine cups of water. 
•  Dispose of diapers, gloves, bandages and pa per products used to clean up body fluids in 
individual, tightly se aled plastic bags. 
•  If a child bites you and draws blood, wash area  immediately with soap and water.  For any 
human bite wound, consult with your doctor. 
•  Do not allow sharing of toothbrushes or razor blades. 
 
In the event you feel you have been  exposed to an infectious disease during the course of working with 
the foster child placed in your home, inform your worker  and be tested.  The results of the testing should 
be provided to the worker.  In certain situations, the  agency will assist with reimbursement for testing.  
Additionally, the agency offers tr aining related to diseases that can result from blood or other body 
fluids. 
 
H.  PARENTING THE SEXUALLY ABUSED CHILD 
 
Many foster children entering care today have been sexua lly abused.  It is important for foster parents to 
have information about sexually abused children, so they can decide if they are prepared for this 
challenge.  Children who come into foster care that  have been sexually abused have special needs.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 20 	
 
 
 
Sexual abuse may occur within the child’s family, wh
ich is called incest, or it may be committed by 
people not related to the child.   Examples of sexual activity are se xual touching, kissing, fondling, 
manipulation of the genitals with the fingers, and actual se xual intercourse. 
 
Children who have been sexually abused may have  difficulty talking about what happened to them.  
Instead of talking, they may act out these feelings in behavior that  appears inappropriate; or they may 
withdraw and conceal their experience  as a result of feelings of shame.  Other children may talk about 
their experience at inappropr iate times or with people they should  not.  Help the child understand with 
whom and when it’s appropriate to  discuss their history.  Foster parents must un derstand that certain 
behavior is the child’s attempt to comm unicate feelings about their experience. 
 
Fostering a sexually abused child can be stressful at  times for every family member.  Some stressors 
may cause abuse in the foster home.  Foster pare nts are not “super humans” and in many cases, their 
own “triggers” are pushed and they  instantly respond.  For example, finding your foster child engaged in 
masturbating or playing sexually  with another child in your home may cause you an unwarranted 
response if you are not prepared to  handle the situation and your own feelings about it.  It is very 
important that you, as foster parents, explore your  own feelings regarding sexual activities and sexual 
abuse.   
 
A sexually abused child/adolescent may act in a seductive manner.  Some fost er parents or foster 
siblings may sexually react to the  foster child.  A foster child giving a “good night” kiss to a foster 
parent may have delivered the kiss on the mouth in  a passionate way.  This may have stirred sexual 
feelings in the foster parent.  Even if the foster parent handled the kiss appropr iately by saying, “I feel 
uncomfortable when you kiss me on the mouth”, he or she may still feel guilt for being aroused.  It is 
very important to help the child underst and appropriate behavior in your household. 
 
The different attachment and stirring  of sexual feelings can also occur with foster parents’ adolescent 
and grown children.  While this does not occur in all si tuations, it is in the child’s and your best interest 
not to allow adolescent or grown males to  baby sit or care for foster children. 
 
Sexually abused children sometimes make false sexual a buse allegations against their foster family.  If it 
is a false allegation, the reasons for it  could be the child may be angry or wanting to exert control.  They 
may have misinterpreted the foster  parent’s affection.  These steps can  help prevent false allegations:   
 
• Secure accurate information upon placement of child, if  available.  Ask the worker specifically if 
there has been any documented or suspected sexual abuse. 
•  Discuss suggested Family Safety Rules (Part 3) when the child is placed. 
•  Do not leave the child alone with another child. 
•  Make sure each child has his own bedroom. 
•  Be clear on the rules of dress, privacy, touching, etc. 
•  Avoid teasing, tickling, horsep lay or suggestive language. 
•  Record any sexually acting out  in writing and contact worker.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 21 	
 
 	
• 
Send your written report to the child’s social worker and therapist. 
•  Have a support system for the family, i.e., frie nd, foster family support group, therapist, etc. 
•  Have time alone to reduce stress. 
•  Have agreed upon rules, bounda ries and consequences. 
•  Feel comfortable talking with children about  sexuality, sexual abuse and personal safety. 
 
The more information you can receive about the child,  the better you are able to help him.  Don’t be 
afraid to ask the caseworker questions about your foster  child.  This child will be living in your home for 
a long duration and it can be a time of “growth” for everyone.  Be aware of the agency’s mandated 
requirement to investigate allegatio ns of abuse or neglect made by a child.  Refer to the section on 
Allegation of Abuse and Neglect. 
 
I.  ALLEGATIONS OF ABUSE AND/OR NEGLECT 
 
Foster parents are agency team members who, because  of their role as primary caregivers for abused or 
neglected children, may be vulnerable  to allegations of maltreatment.  The first objective for everyone is 
to ensure that children are emotionally, physically  and psychologically safe while in foster care. 
 
A standard procedure is followed when an allegation of  suspected abuse or neglect in a foster home is 
received.  Reports alleging child abuse and neglect in  foster homes are referred to the Child Protection 
Investigation (CPI) Unit.  Experien ced professionals will screen the re port and a determination will be 
made as to whether the report will  be assigned for investigation.  The assigned investigator will make 
attempts to contact the alleged child victim first.   This is agency policy and not an attempt to ignore the 
foster parent.  After interviewing the child, the inve stigator will contact the foster parent and inform 
them of the investigation.   Should your home be investigated by the  agency in response to an allegation 
of abuse or neglect, remember that no matter how  badly you feel, it is to your benefit to openly share 
what you know with the investigating agency staff.   The decision to remove or allow foster children to 
remain in the home is based on a determination of the child’s safety and information received during the 
investigative process.  Foster pare nts will be notified of the results of the report following the completed 
investigation. 
 
The Home Development worker or the  child’s foster care worker investigates child care deficiencies.  
These are concerns regarding the care provided to children in foster care which do not meet the legal 
definition of abuse/neglect and are  violations of agency policy and/or licensing standards of care for 
children.  Some examples of child care deficiencies  include use of corporal punishment, denial of basic 
rights and inappropriate restraint.  If a problem is  found in the home, the home may be closed or the 
agency may develop a corrective acti on plan in order for you to continue to care for foster children. 
 
It is normal to experience an array  of feelings during the investigation  of allegations of abuse or neglect 
in foster homes, even when the allegations are false.   As advocates for children, you must remember that 
these procedures are in place to protect children from  any possible maltreatment.   Refer to the section 
on Foster Parent Associations in  this handbook for information on fost er parent support resources.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 22 	
 
 
J.  RUNAWAY, MISSING OR KIDNAPPED FOSTER CHILD
 
 
When there is reason to believe that a child has run  away, been kidnapped, is lost or is otherwise missing 
and at risk of harm, you must c ontact the local law enforcement agency and the foster care worker 
immediately.  You and the worker shall provide law  enforcement with a description of the child, which 
may include photographs, fingerprints, marks, scars,  tattoos, and any other identifying information that 
may prove helpful in the search.   Other helpful information may include possible locations where the 
child may be found, clothes the child was wearing at  the time of the disappearance and individuals the 
child may have been communicating with on-line.  The  identified information shall be sent to the State 
Office Child Protection Investigation Unit to assist in  the development of a poster, which can aid in the 
recovery of the missing foster child.  The child sh all be listed, by the agency, as a missing child or 
endangered runaway on the National Center on Missing and Exploited Children database.   
 
K.  DAY CARE 
 
If day care is necessary for the child placed in your  home, you should discuss the need with the child’s 
OCS worker and determine if the elig ibility criteria for day care services is being  met.  You must choose 
a day care center that is licensed by  the Department of Social Services Bureau of Licensing.  You must 
provide the name of the day care cen ter to the child’s worker.  The child’s worker will determine if the 
center meets the criteria for pr ovision of day care services. 
 
L.  RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 
 
Biological parents do have a right to choose their child ’s religious affiliation and their wishes should be 
respected.  If biological parents state  a religious preference for their child, OCS will make every effort to 
place the child in a foster home of the same religi on.  When this is not possible, it is the shared 
responsibility of the foster parent and the child’s work er to locate a resource to enable the child to attend 
a house of worship of his religion.  It is the role of th e foster parent to provide transportation to religious 
activities and assure appropr iate supervision.  If you attend church  it may be all right for the child to 
attend church with you.  At no time should foster pa rents require or push the child to accept their 
religious beliefs or rituals.  Olde r children may also choose to not part icipate in religious activities or 
choose to participate in different religious services from that of your family. 
 
M.  MANAGING TELEPHONE CALLS AND MAIL 
 
The foster child or foster parent may make long distance telephone calls on the foster parent’s phone to 
the child’s parents/family (as agreed upon in the child ’s case plan) or to make medical appointments or 
to call the worker.  The foster parent will be reim bursed for the listed long distance phone calls.  Long 
distance telephone calling cards, purc hased by the worker for the child, may be used to call family 
members or his worker.  This is allowable when it is  agreed to in the child’s case plan and when the 
telephone card purchased is for 60 minutes or  less and is kept by the foster parent.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 23 	
 
 
A usage log is to be maintained by the foster parent which includes the date, time call(s) began and 
ended, name of person called or attempted to call a
nd the telephone number called.  The log shall be 
submitted to the child’s worker.     
 
A foster child has the right to send and receive mail.   Mail is the private property of the foster child and 
should not be opened or read by th e foster parents except at the child’s request.  They should not be 
pressured into letting foster parents read their mail.   If problems arise with mail, which is disturbing to 
the child, then foster parents should seek  the assistance of the child’s worker. 
 
The child has a right to privacy when communicating  by phone and mail with others or when visiting 
with others, unless otherwise restricted. 
 
N.  INFORMATION TO BE SHARE D WITH THE CHILD’S WORKER 
 
Often foster parents are not aware of  the information they need to share with their foster care worker 
about the children placed in their home.  Sometimes  foster parents may not want to share information 
about the child’s inappropriate beha vior because they’re afraid the foster care worker may think they’re 
not doing a good job. 
 
It is important for foster parents  to remember problems with the child  or children placed in their home 
are bound to happen and are expected by the agency.  Talking with your ch ild’s worker about things the 
child is doing that are causing problems in your hom e gives the worker a chance to discuss with you 
possible ways of handling the child’ s behavior.  Working together as a team makes it easier for the 
foster care worker and the foster pa rent to deal with the problems and helps the child adjust to the foster 
parent’s home. 
 
You may find it helpful to keep a journal or log about  important issues or things that have come up with 
the child.  You will be able to refer to your notes when you meet with the child’s worker and not worry 
that you will forget important pieces of informati on, which may have occurred several days or weeks 
earlier.  This is especially helpful if you have more  than one child in your home.  This helps you track 
the progress you and the child are making. 
 
The following are examples of information foster parents need to share with the foster care worker: 
 
• The child’s eating and sleeping habits; his likes  and dislikes, and things he talks about; the 
child’s personality – is he friendly or withdrawn;  how he acts toward family members, at school 
and in the neighborhood. 
•  The child’s abilities:  does he s eem to know how to do things like other children his age?  Can he 
dress, feed and bathe himself, brush his teeth, et c?  Does the child know how to use a knife, fork 
and spoon when eating?  Does the child appear  to have trouble hearing, reading, speaking or 
writing? 
•  Does the child talk about his parents, sisters, br others, friends or relatives?  If so, what does he 
say?

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 24 	
 
 	
• 
Does the child seem to know the reason why he is  in your home or in foster care?  Has the child 
asked when he is going to visit his parents  or when he’ll be able to go back home?  
•  Does the child behave differently be fore or after he goes for a visit with his parents?  If he does, 
how does he act? 
•  Do you talk to child before and after the visit?   If so, what kinds of things do you say and talk 
about?  If you don’t say much or anything at all,  before and after the visit, is there a reason? 
•  What kinds of things have happened that have cau sed problems or have been hard to handle?  
Talk about these kinds of situ ations and how they are handle d.  You may want to ask for 
information on ways to handle any similar situations that may come up in the future. 
•  How would you describe the child’s health? 
•  What kinds of things do you  think would help the child? 
•  If you are worried about how the child acts sometim es, describe his behavior, how often he acts 
this way, how you handle it, and how other peopl e in the family or at school handle it.  
Remembering and talking about what happened be fore the child got angry or upset is good 
information because it can help you and the child’ s worker understand the nature of the problem. 
•  How do the members of your immediate family,  relatives, friends and neighbors feel about you 
having a child placed in your care?   Talk about their good and bad feelings. 
•  Has the child’s presence in your  home affected any of the relationships among family members?  
If yes, talk about what relati onships in your family have been  affected and how you are handling 
it. 
•  Provide school information re garding the child such as attendance, conduct, detentions, 
suspensions, report cards, IEP, progress  reports, IOWA and LEAP scores, etc. 
 
O.  EMERGENCY PLANNING  
 
Foster parents should have an emergency plan for thei r family including their foster children in the event 
of a crisis (i.e., evacuation of the  home).  The plan should be shared with the OCS worker when a child 	
is placed in the home. *The agency expects foster  parents to evacuate their family (inclusive of the 
foster child placed in the home) when Parish officials have declared a mandatory evacuation and assure 
the continued safety of the foster child(ren) in their care.** 
 
P.  ADOPTION OF A FOSTER CHILD 
 
There are some children who cannot re turn to their biological family or primary caretaker.  When this 
occurs, the agency will explore the foster parents’ fee lings regarding adoption of the child.  If the foster 
parents are interested in adoption of the foster child  and an assessment by the agency indicates that there 
is a healthy attachment between the child and fo ster parent, and remaining with the family on a 
permanent basis is in the child’s best interest, the  foster parent is given much consideration as an 
adoptive placement. 
 
Foster parents are considered eligible to be certified as adoptive parents if they have completed the 
appropriate pre-service training offered by the agency when they  are certified as foster and adoptive 
parents and if the following conditions are met:

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 3. Living With A Foster Child 
Section No./Name Living With A Foster Child 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  November 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 25 	
 
 	
• 
The home is a certified home; 
•  The home has no validated incidence of abuse/neglect; 
•  The child is legally available fo r adoption and no relative or other person known to the child is 
determined to be an appropriate permanent placement; 
•  The child has been placed in the certifie d foster home for a minimum of one year; 
•  The foster parent wishes to adopt the child, the  child is of appropriate age and desires to be 
adopted; and 
•  The foster parent(s) is single, legally marri ed or divorced, not just legally separated. 
 
Foster parents planning to adopt th eir foster child should also be prepared for the kinds of grieving 
behaviors they can expect from the  child during the adoption process.  Even when the foster parent has 
had the child in their home for some time, the child wi ll likely still experience and/or re-experience loss.  
The adoption decision may remind the child of earlier  losses.  The foster family has the benefit of 
knowing the previous grieving behaviors of the child; however, they  may be surprised to see such 
behaviors again.   
 
Q.  WHEN A FOSTER CHILD LEAVES  
 
Moves experienced by foster children evoke physical , social and emotional changes that affect the 
children and all involved families.  When children l eave the foster home, all individuals involved need 
to be included in the planning.  Moves of a foster  child include reunification with his parents/caretaker, 
relatives, change of foster care  placement or adoption.  Foster pare nts are responsible for helping the 
foster child prepare physically and emotionally for his move. 
 
When a child leaves the foster home,  all personal belongings  (gifts given to the child such as toys, 
bicycles, clothing, life book, memorabi lia, pictures, medical card, educational/medical information, etc.) 
must go with the child.  The child’s  belongings are to be respectfully packed in a suitcase, trunk, box or 
other appropriate container.  Trash bags are not  appropriate for packing the child’s belongings.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 4. Discipline 
Section No./Name Discipline 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 26 	
 
 
PART 4 – DISCIPLINE 
 
A.  METHODS  
 
Discipline is teaching a child how to react in soci
ally acceptable ways.  Children need discipline to 
develop self-confidence, self-respect and dignity.  We  teach them by our responses and interactions and 
by helping them to develop self-control, self-concep t and self-esteem.  It is by gradual experiences, 
geared to their age and level of maturity, that childre n learn to control their behaviors in order to gain 
long-term satisfaction and achievements.  They  need help in developing these inner controls. 
 
Foster parents must administer discipline in a c onstructive way that meets the needs of the child’s 
development and past experiences.   By letting children learn the logical and natural consequences of 
their behavior, we begin to teach the child self-discipline. 
 
Every day people are confronted w ith situations to which we may respond in numerous ways.  Our 
response is based on the choi ces available to the situation and our past experi ences.  Our behavior is 
shaped by the choices we make in every situation.   Foster parents and biological parents are faced with 
important questions in helping chil dren make correct choices.  We mu st assist children to develop a 
positive self-concept, which will help them to begin to feel lovable, capable, worthwhile and 
responsible. 
 
Discipline needs to be done in a planned manner and  not in reaction to something that has happened.  
You need to be able to identify the problem, assess  it and then decide what action is most appropriate 
based on the child’s individual needs and  situation.  By using this process, identifying the problem, 
assessing the problem and deciding on the best action , the effectiveness of your discipline will 
increase.  Any discipline plan needs  to be used consistently.  It is important to always help the child 
understand that it is the behavior  that is unacceptable, not the child.  However, behaviors beyond the 
child’s control, such as bedwetting, learning problems , crying, etc. should not be the focus of discipline 
or punishment. 
 
The impact of consequences needs to be considered  when choosing problems or behaviors to focus on.  
Does the child run out into the st reet without looking?  Does he turn the stove on without telling 
anybody?  It would be overwhelming for  the child to work on all noted problems or behaviors.  It is best 
to choose one or two problems or  behaviors to work on at a time. 
 
Discipline and punishment methods  should be discussed with the child’s worker.  You should not 
hesitate to call the worker if  you are in doubt as to how to  manage a behavior problem. 
 
B.  INAPPROPRIATE METHODS OF DISCIPLINE 
 
A frequently asked question is:  Is  it okay to spank a foster child?  The  answer to this question is:  No, it 
is not okay to spank a foster child.  As a fost er parent, you should adhere to the following:

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 4. Discipline 
Section No./Name Discipline 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 27 	
 
 	
• 
It is never acceptable to slap, strike or hit a foster child.  
•  It is never acceptable  to spank a foster child, under any circumstance.  
•  It is never acceptable to hit a foster child with a fist or an object. 
•  It is never acceptable to shake a foster child.  
•  It is never acceptable to pop the hand,  buttock and legs of a foster child. 
•  It is never acceptable to use a chemical, drug,  physical or mechanical restraint on a foster 
child.  
 
In addition, the following forms of  punishment are not to be used: 
 
• Cruel, humiliating, severe and unusual punishment , such as putting the child on his knees; 
•  Verbal abuse, ridicule, humiliation or derogatory remarks about the foster child or his family; 
•  Threats of removal from your home; 
•  Denial of meals and daily needs; 
•  Assignment of excessive or in appropriate work or chores; 
•  Permitting a child to punish another child; 
•  Allowing the sexual abuse of a child; 
•  Denial of mail, telephone calls or planned vi sits with the family or child’s worker; 
•  Placing the foster child in a locked room; and 
•  Requiring or denying the foster child’s participation in religious activities. 
 
For children who have been abused,  spanking or smacking can be terribly damaging.  Using alternatives 
to physical punishment has two important benefits.  Firs t, it minimizes the risk of additional hurt to a 
child.  Second, it helps break  the intergenerational cycle of physical abuse. 
 
Foster children need the security that develops from  being an accepted part of the foster family.  This 
means sharing and participating in  the family’s activities, doing chores, obeying the rules and receiving 
discipline when it is needed.  Being consistent  and correcting a child’s unacceptable behavior in a 
positive manner is the key to success. 
 
C.  INCREASE POSTIVE/WANTED BEHAVIORS 
 
The best method of teaching is to  reward and praise children for positiv e behavior.  It gives the child a 
feeling of accomplishment and wort h, shows the child your good feelings for him and fosters a positive 
relationship that makes the child want to please.   The following presents the steps and examples for 
disciplining with praise. 
 
Reward desired behaviors often and quickly.   If you praise your foster child’s positive behavior as 
soon as it happens, the child will be mo re likely to repeat this behavior.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 4. Discipline 
Section No./Name Discipline 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 28 	
 
 
Be specific in your praise or rewards.  
Be specific when describing the good behavior for the foster 
child.  What did the child actually say or do that  pleased you?  For example, “You quietly waited for 
your turn”, rather than saying, “What a good boy.” 
 
Explain the results of the specific behavior.   What were the results and positive effects of the 
behavior?  “The other children wanted to play  with you because you took your turn and you were happy 
playing with them.” 
 
Express how you feel about the behavior.   Let the child hear your feelings of happiness, appreciation, 
pride, etc.  “It makes me feel very  happy to see you help set the table.” 
 
Set a good example.   If you want your child to put things awa y, put your own things away and show the 
child what you would like him to do.  The ch ild should begin to imitate the behavior. 
 
Point out that something fun will follow positive behavior.   For example, “After you put your clothes 
away, you can go play in the yard.” 
 
Some examples for positive consequences:  
  -Earn a star or check (redeemed later as a reward) 
  -Watch a late TV show        -Play an extra game together 
  -Take the child to special pl aces      -Read an extra story 
  -Specific rewards (small toy)/privi leges    -Special treats for dinner 
 
Most children respond more readily to positive reinfor cement.  Being generous with words of praise can 
be a motivating factor in incr easing wanted behaviors.  Some examples of words of praise may 
include the following: 
 -Thank you      -Marvelous 
 -Much better      -Perfect 
 -Wonderful      -You are learning fast. 
  -I like the way you did that.        -You are a good helper. 
 
D.  DECREASE/STOP NEGA TIVE/UNWANTED BEHAVIORS 
 
Be aware that negative beha vior on the part of a child can serve as a means for getting attention.  The 
following provides steps and examples for helping the child change negati ve/unwanted behaviors: 
 
Redirecting Behavior 
This is a simple, basic method of managing unwanted beha viors.  The child is redirected to an activity 
that is acceptable without making an issue of the negativ e behavior.  If a child is being destructive with a 
certain toy, it can be suggested that  he play outside for a while or come help you.  Refocusing the child’s 
interest and energy to an activity or  behavior that is acceptable can be a simple, yet, effective way to 
stop what might otherwise develop into a major out burst or destructive action. By decreasing the 
frequency and intensity of the unde sirable behavior, new patterns of behaviors and habits are formed.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 4. Discipline 
Section No./Name Discipline 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 29 	
 
 
Ignoring Behaviors
 
It is good to ignore certain unwanted behaviors.  Ev en negative attention such as scolding will often 
cause a child to keep behaving badly.  For example, if  your foster child is having a tantrum, make sure 
the child is safe and then direct your attention el sewhere.  When the tantrum stops, give the child 
attention.  Ignoring is particul arly effective with complaining, whining and nagging behaviors. 
 
Correcting  
It is important to discipline immediately after the ne gative behavior occurs.  When correcting a child, try 
to use positive language.  For example, “Please close the door quietly next tim e” is better than “Don’t 
slam the door.” 
 
Focus on Unwanted Behaviors  
Always comment on unwanted behavior and not the child.  For exam ple, say, “No playing with the 
food” rather than “You’re so sloppy!” 
 
State Reason for Discipline  
Briefly state a reason for punishment  such as “Hitting is not allowed.” 
 
Some Examples of Choices for Negative Consequences:  
  -Miss favorite TV show      -Removal of some privileges 
  -TV is off earlier than usual    -Grounding to a certain area 
  -Developing a behavioral  contract   -Extra chores 
  -Restitution by child of ot her persons’ property damaged or destroyed by the child 
-Time out (usually one minute for each year of age  – e.g., three year olds have three   minutes of 
time out, four years olds have f our minutes of time out, etc.) 
 
E.  TIME-OUT 
 
Time out is an acceptable discipli ne method that works in controllin g behavior of children between the 
ages of two and twelve.  It allows  the child an opportunity to think about his behavior.  The child is 
placed in a quiet place until a signal that the time-out  has ended.  The place chosen for time-out should 
be away from interesting or rewarding activities such  as TV.  For a very small child, the spot could be a 
time-out chair.  For an ol der child (about five years) , it would be appropriate to place the child in 
another room in the house with the door to the room  open.  The rule of thumb is that the child’s age 
determines the length of time-out, about one minute for  each year of age.  For example, a two year old 
would be in time-out for two minutes and a three ye ar old for three minutes.  Behaviors that respond 
well to time-outs include:  hitting, spitting, slappi ng, pinching and throwing food at the table. 
 
The goal of a time-out is for the child to realize  that he needs to calm down and behave in a more 
appropriate way.  Some children have  been known to request time-out when they realize their behavior 
is out of control.  Time-out is not a personal attack on the child.  It is simply a calm and non-violent 
consequence to the child’s misbehavior.  Time-outs work because the procedure is  easy for an adult to

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 4. Discipline 
Section No./Name Discipline 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 30 	
 
 
learn and the adult can model being 
calm and non-violent.  The time-out serves as a clear signal to the 
child that the behavior in question will not be tolerated. 
 
F.  REWARDS 
 
A Reward or Behavior Plan is an effective way to pr ovide motivation to help children improve behavior.  
The rewards are for doing something right or positive.  The following is an example of a behavior chart. 
 
Billy’s Reward Chart  
Task Monday Tuesday Wednesday  Thursday Friday Saturday  Sunday 
Homework 	9   9   9  	 	9  	  	
Feed the Dog 	9   9  	 	9   	 	9    9  	
Clear the Table 	9   	 	9   	  	9   	 	
 
TOTAL NUMBER  OF 	9  	= 12   	
 
To set up a reward system you must 
be specific about the behaviors you wi sh to help the child increase.  
Only select a few behaviors to target.  The  following will help you develop a behavior chart. 
 
• First, it is important to include the child’s input in setting up any behavior plan. 
•  List the behaviors you wish to increase.  Thes e could include feeding the dog, cleaning the table 
after meals, making their bed, completing homework by dinnertime, etc. 
•  Next, decide on a reward or set up a reward  menu with a number of rewards and their point 
value. 
•  Be sure the reward system is appropriate to  the child’s age, maturity and ability level. 
•  Be aware the younger children respond  best to highly visible, frequent rewards (such as stickers) 
that can be enjoyed immediately.  Older children often respond well to systems where they can 
earn points or stars to be redeem ed for rewards at a later date. 
 
When a reward system is successful, the behaviors will become easier for the child and will occur more 
frequently.  After a time the behaviors will become  habits and another target behavior can be added. 
 
Some examples of the reward system may include the following: 
  10 Stars may earn the child $1; 
  20 Stars may earn the child a tr ip to the video store; and 
  30 Stars may earn the child a special treat (a stuffed animal or a trip to the movies). 
 
G.  GUIDES TO ACHIEVE POSITIVE DISCIPLINE  9 Establish well-defined rules that set th e expectations and limits of behavior. 
9  Respect individual differences in children;  for example, age, personality, likes and 
dislikes. 
9  Set realistic goals within a child’s ability to achieve. 
9  Try to separate behavior causes by anxiety  or tension from deliberate misbehavior.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 4. Discipline 
Section No./Name Discipline 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 31 	
 
 
 
H.  DO(S) AND DON’T(S) OF PARENTING 
 
Don’t(s) Do(s) 	
-Don’t use punishment excessively. 
-Don’t slap, hit or shake the child. 
-Don’t shame or threaten  or ridicule the child. 
-Don’t be excessively strict and controlling. 
-Don’t be overly permissive. 
-Don’t have too many unimportant rules and 
   regulations. 
-Don’t insist on always being right. 
-Don’t feel you always have to be in charge. 
-Don’t reject the child. 
-Don’t ridicule the child’s fear. 
-Don’t make the child feel guilty about his 
  feelings. 
-Don’t model behaviors and attitudes you don’t 
   want the child to learn. 
-Don’t have excessively high standards for a 
   neat house. 
  -Reward good behavior.  Redirect destructive  
   behaviors. 
-Treat the child with love and affection. 
-Build a positive self-concept by showing respect 
  for your child and helping him feel good about 
  himself. 
-Allow the child freedom to make some of his 
   own decisions. 
-Reward independent achievement and  
  cooperation. 
-Establish reasonable but flexible limits for your 
  child’s behavior. 
-Have very few important, simple rules that are 
  regularly enforced. 
-Let the child express his own opinions even if 
  they sometimes differ from yours. 
-Be responsive to your child’s needs and interests 
  as they occur. 
-Get involved with the child.  Spend time 
   together. 
-Do things together that are fun. 
-Try to understand and help the child deal with 
  his fears. 
-Comfort the child when he is distressed. 
-Help the child realize that
 any feelings are okay 
  but violent actions are not. 
-Help the child verbalize about feelings. 
-Model positive social behaviors and attitudes. 
-Realize that a young ch ild’s needs are more 
  important than a neat house. 
-Child proof your house. 	
American Red Cross.  Parenting:  Your Child from One to Six, Parent’s Guide.  
Garden City, N.Y.:  Doubleday & Co., 1981.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 5. Health Care 
Section No./Name Health Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 32 	
 
 
PART 5 – HEALTH CARE 
 
A.  TREATMENT RESPONSIBILITY 
 
The Office of Community Services has the overall 
responsibility for the physical, medical, dental and 
emotional care of foster children.  The agency is ultimately responsible for making provisions for 
preventive and remedial care and/or  treatment for any condition that is dangerous to the child’s physical 
or mental health. 
 
Because the caretakers are in the best position to  observe and note the child’s needs for medical 
attention, much responsibility for secu ring medical care is delegated to foster parents.   Foster parents 
are responsible for seeing the chil d keeps all scheduled appointments  and sharing the completed medical 
form and/or the results of the physician’s diagnosis,  tests and treatment with the child’s worker.  Foster 
parents should obtain approval from the Foster Care worker for non-emergent treatment or 
hospitalizations. 
 
B.  COMMUNICATION OF KNOWN HEALTH PROBLEMS 
 
Children entering care may have pre-existing conditions some  of which may be due to abuse and/or 
neglect.  They may also be reac ting to the trauma of placement.   Many of these conditions cannot be 
treated with good daily childcare  activities alone and may require medical treatment.   
 
During pre-placement and at the time of placement, th e child’s social worker will provide information 
about the child’s physical and ment al health.  For infants and very young children, this information may 
include hospital records and  medical records from health department  clinics, pediatricians, etc., if 
available.   
 
C.  PHYSICIAN CHOICE 
 
Medical provider choice is limited to licensed physic ians and facilities who participate in the KidMed 
and/or Medicaid.  All foster children receive a Me dicaid card for obtaining medical services.  Any 
services not covered by the medica l card, required by the child, are to  be discussed with the child’s 
worker prior to obtaining the service. 
 
D.  MEDICAL CARE/FORMS/RECORD 
 
A child entering foster care must have a medical ex am.  If the child had an exam 30 days prior to 
entering foster care, this is acceptable.  However,  if the child has not had a recent exam, one must be 
completed within seven calendar days of child entering care.  If an initial examination is necessary, the 
OCS worker will discuss with you sc heduling an appointment with a KidMed physician or clinic for the 
child to have a medical examination completed within seven calendar days of custody.  Thereafter, the 
following schedule of examina tions should be followed:

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 5. Health Care 
Section No./Name Health Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 33 	
 
 	
• 
A child under the age of one should see a doctor ev ery three months, or as often as recommended 
by the physician; 
•  From age one or two, the child should continue to  be seen as often as his condition requires, but 
at least once per year (including visits for required immunizations as outlined in Appendix G), 
and as recommended by the child’s pediatrician; 
•  For children over the age  of two, it is required that a thorough physical examination be arranged 
annually; 
•  Because immunizations are given free to children at  local health units and are also paid through 
Medicaid at programs such as KidMed, OCS  will not pay for immunizations given by a non-
participating provider/physician; and 
•  Unless the child’s condition warra nts a specific physician, a local KidMed provider or doctor 
accepting Medicaid should be used. 
 
Annual medical examinations must be documented in  the child’s case record.  The worker will provide 
OCS Form 98-F for completion by the physician or the  KidMed provider.  This physical form shall be 
used for documentation of visits to KidMed Clinics.   The child’s worker is to be given the completed 
form. 
 
Foster parents should keep written records of a child’s  medical and/or dental treatments, illnesses or 
injuries which occur during the foster child’s stay in  the foster home.  The child’s worker is to be 
informed of these illnesses and treatments as they o ccur.  This record should be included in the child’s 
Life Book (refer to Part 9 of this handbook) al ong with other significant events and changes. 
 
E.  EYE AND DENTAL SERVICES 
 
Prior to making an appointment for the child to have  eye or dental treatment, the foster parent must 
contact the foster care worker.  However, the fost er parent should schedule the child’s routine annual 
eye or dental exam.  These services must be obtained from a Medicaid  or KidMed provider. 
 
Orthodontia services must be aut horized for payment by Medicaid.   If agency funded treatment was 
approved prior to January 2006, it may be cont inued until the treatment is completed. 
 
F.  EMERGENCY TREATMENT 
 
The physician makes the decision regard ing the need for the child to be hospitalized.  Authorization for 
the hospital to treat the child is given by the worker  on a form which is provided by the hospital.  Except 
in emergencies, the worker shall give such authorization in advance.  In cases  involving surgery, general 
anesthesia or unusual treatment, a biological parent  or court consent may be necessary.  The worker 
must be involved in the authorization process.  The fo ster parent is to notify the child’s worker as soon 
as possible when the child is hospitalized. 
 
A child may also come into contact with a poisonous  substance.  Should the child(ren) eat, inhale or 
come into contact with any substa nce that can cause harmful effects  to the body, the foster parent should

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 5. Health Care 
Section No./Name Health Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 34 	
 
 
immediately contact the Louisiana Drug and Poison In
formation Center  (phone number is listed in 
Appendix G).  Contact must also be  made with the child’s worker. 
 
G.  PAYMENT RESPONSIBILITY 
 
The agency is responsible for all medical and dental ca re of foster children.  A medical card is provided 
to foster parents for those children in their care.   Since the medical card covers medical expenses, it is 
important to show the child’s card to the treating faci lity or pharmacist, who will then bill Medicaid.  All 
doctors and dentists do not part icipate in the Medicaid Program.  When making an appointment, the 
foster parents should ask if the doctor or dentist accep ts Medicaid.  If the foster parents have trouble 
locating a doctor or dentist, they should ask the child’s worker for assistance. 
 
Most medical expenses are covered by the child’s me dical card.  Foster parents can be reimbursed for 
certain prescription drugs and medical emergencies when the child’s medical card does not cover these 
expenses.  In these instances, it is preferable for the medical providers to bill the agency directly.  The 
agency will forward to the medical provider the appropriate payment forms. 
 
H.  MEDICAL SUPPLIES AND MEDICATIONS 
 
Routine medical supplies, such as band-aids, Tylenol,  etc., are not reimbursable to the foster parent. 
 
The following criteria is to be followed  when providing children with medication: 
•  To only give prescription medi cation to the child if prescribed by a physician for that child; 
•  To not change the dosage of the  medication without doctor’s orders; 
•  To notify the child’s worker or responsible supervisor within one wor\
king day when 
psychotropic medications (medications to cont rol behavior) are prescribed for the child; 
•  To exercise good judgment in providing non-pre scription medications only when the child 
actually needs them and shall use non-prescrip tion medications only in accordance with the 
directions on the label of medicine; 
•  To make every effort to learn  and to look for potential negative  side effects of both prescription 
and non-prescription drugs and to  immediately report negative side effects to a physician and to 
the child’s worker as soon as possible; 
•  To be responsible for making available medicati ons ordered for the child and for storing those 
medications and medical supplies out of reach of the child(ren); 
•  To keep a medication log for the child  detailing all medications given; and 
•  To call 911 Emergency Services immediately when emergency care is needed. 
 
I.  MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 
 
Treatment is available to resolve emotional or psyc hiatric problems of foster children when indicated.  
Referral for treatment by the worker and supervisor is  based on their assessment of the child’s needs.  
While the child may be the identified client, it is  expected that much, if not most, of the therapeutic

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 5. Health Care 
Section No./Name Health Care 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 35 	
 
 
contact will be made with the child’s foster family.  Treatment will normally focus on helping the child 
and his caregiver to better manage hi
s behavior at home and at school. 
 
Treatment will progress more rapidly if you are activ ely involved.  There are a number of reasons for 
this.  First of all, if the therapis t has the cooperation of the foster pare nt, they can get to the cause of the 
problem quicker and the foster parent can back up th e therapist’s strategies for bringing about change.  
Secondly, if the therapy does not seem to be worki ng, the therapist will be quicker to try something 
different. 
 
Make it a point to be available and ask for a short  period of time at the end of each session with the 
therapist.  Use the time to tell th e therapist what you have observed sinc e the last session and to have the 
therapist bring you up to date.  You should expect that the therapist will not discuss the details of the 
sessions due to confidentiality.  The therapist can  give you general information on how things are 
progressing and what you and the child should be working on until the next session.  It is helpful for you 
to make notes about what has happened in between se ssions and also helpful to take notes on what the 
therapist tells you at the end of sessions and the actio ns you are to do.  These periods with the therapist, 
when required documentation is completed, can count  towards your annual in-service training hours. 
 
Foster parent involvement in the ch ild’s therapy is beneficial for you and the child.  The assistance will 
help the whole family.  Therapeutic information and act ions are to be discussed with the child’s foster 
care worker. 
 
Waiver Services for developmental disabilities and Ea rly Steps Referrals may be available for the child 
placed in your home.  As a foster parent, you should  direct all inquiries for services offered by providers 
to the child’s assigned worker.  You should never re fuse services without notifying the child’s OCS 
worker.  You should discuss with  the worker any problems you encounter  in arranging or participating 
in developmental services.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 6. School 
Section No./Name School 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 36 	
 
 
PART 6 - SCHOOL 
 
A.  LAWS TO HELP A CHILD IN SCHOOL 
 
The foster child’s educational need
s are to be met through the public school system.  Section 504 of the 
Americans with Disabilities Act is designed to pr ovide accommodations to students with disabilities 
who also qualify for services under the Act.  Sec tion 504 was enacted to eliminate issues that would 
hinder full participation in the cla ssroom setting by persons with disabi lities. The school is required to 
provide various accommodations to help the student achieve his highest potential. This must be done 
outside of special education departments. 
 
The law is for children who have difficulty in school  with learning, but are above the functioning level 
to qualify for specialized services.  Often these ch ildren get in trouble for fighting, cheating or not 
paying attention.  This is the child whose school or t eacher may have told you that he is immature, he is 
just not motivated or there is a need for more atte ntion focused on addressing school issues.    You may 
have been told that the child is  smart, but just needs to buckle dow n and work.  Your child may have a 
learning disability.   
 
The following are actions to determine a child’s learning needs and the type of accommodations the 
school is to provide.  9 You begin this process by talking  first to your child’s school counselor or teacher.  Remember, 
the law entitles your foster child  to receive these services, so do not  be put off by school officials 
who say they cannot or do not provide this type of  testing or this type of accommodations, etc.  
They are under legal obligation to  do so and refusal can place them in violation of the law. Refer 
any problems you encounter in securing school services to the child’s worker. 
9  A formal evaluation is required to get an accurate  diagnosis of any and all hidden disabilities of 
your foster child.  This can be arranged through  your child’s school.  Be sure to ask that your 
child also be tested for Attention Deficit  Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD), if this seems 
appropriate.  This evaluation is called a 504 Ev aluation and upon completion it is effective for 
three years. 
9  If you think your foster child needs accommodations  in his classroom or the ones he has now are 
inadequate or insufficient, you can also contact  your regional Special Education Coordinator for 
special assistance. 
 
Some examples of accommodations are listed below: 
• Provide a tape recorder for school  and home use so student can tape lessons, assignments and/or 
homework; 
•  Tape teacher lessons; 
•  Provide peer tutoring an d/or peer note taker; 
•  Repeating directions to the student  after they have been given to the class:  then have him repeat 
and explain directions to teacher, or simplifying  complex directions by first breaking them down 
into parts; 
•  Reducing the reading leve l of the assignments;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 6. School 
Section No./Name School 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 37 	
 
 	
• 
Not grading handwriting; 
•  Train the child to use a computer so that wo rk will no longer be turned in handwritten; 
•  Require that the child only do a  certain numbers of problems; for example:  the child understands 
the concepts, but takes excessive time to complete the assignment;  
•  Provide a calculator for all school  work where math is involved; 
•  Change of classrooms and/or teachers; 
•  Have student leave any class when overwhelmed  – go to special education classroom to unwind 
and talk to the teacher; 
•  Have all tests read to your child; for example:   a science test becomes a test of reading ability 
rather than science skills if your  child is an auditory learner; 
•  Allowing student to give test answers on tape recorder; 
•  Allowing extra time for exams; 
•  Allow certain classes to be waiv ed and alternatives placed; and 
•  Move the child to a vocational track and give  him credit for work experience or vocational 
training. 
 
These accommodations are achieved  by having an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) completed for 
the child once the  504 evaluation is completed.  The IEP is upda ted when a change is indicated or at 
least annually.  School systems frequently offer wo rkshops, classes or have written information on 
parent and children’s educational rights.  You are en couraged to attend such meetings, when possible, 
and obtain additional information.   
 
You are also encouraged to put any requests to the school regarding the child’s learning needs and 
specific accommodations in  writing and keep a copy. 
 
B.  GUIDELINES TO HELP FOSTER  PARENTS WITH CHILD’S EDUCATION 
 
9 Most school information is sent home with the ch ild.  As a foster parent, you are responsible for 
sharing this information, for example, a report  card, with the foster care worker and the 
biological parent.  This is a great  opportunity for the foster parent to work with the parent for the 
benefit of the child. 
9  Make an assessment of the child’s clothing need s prior to when the child begins school and 
assure the child is dressed in keeping with sc hool standards and peer group.  As school clothing 
is included in the regular foster care board rate,  you may want to begin your purchase a couple of 
months in advance to sp read the costs over time. 
9  Take the child to school on the first day. 
9  Attend PTA meetings, teacher meetings and other  activities related to the child’s educational 
needs. 
9  Apply for free breakfast and lunch.  Your income  is not used as a measure of eligibility.  Send 
money for lunch and snacks when required or prior  to completion of application for free meals. 
9  Assist the child with homework  and other class assignments (as needed for a child based on their 
age and developmental level). 
9  Provide a quiet, well-lit place for the child to complete homework.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 6. School 
Section No./Name School 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 38 	
 
 	
9
 Provide the child with school s upplies (e.g., pens, pencils, paper, notebooks, backpack, etc.).  
Keep the school supply list and original receipts for reimbursement. 
9  See that the child gets to sc hool on time and is picked up on time when the school day ends. 
9  Provide a child care plan if foster parent(s) work.  Who will care for the child before and after 
school hours?  Provide this informa tion to the foster care worker. 
9  You can give permission for ordina ry events such as field trips or other school activities.  The 
foster care worker must give approval for  extended trips and expenses beyond the allowable 
amounts. 
 
C.  SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES:  FO STER CARE WORKER/FOSTER PARENT 
 
The foster care worker will be availa ble to assist the foster parent with entering a child in a new school.  
All necessary records, such as transfer records,  immunization record, birth certificate, etc. will be 
obtained and provided by  the child’s worker.   
 
Foster parents need to be an activ e educational advocate for the child.  Take the child to the new school 
to give support on the first day.  Meet with the pr incipal and teacher to let them know you are involved 
and available.  Share with them  any special education or behavi oral needs the child has and any 
suggestions to manage the behaviors.  Inform the principal that corporal punishment is not allowed for 
the child.  Stay in touch with school staff, make pe riodic visits and when necessary involve the child’s 
worker.  Always share any information or sc hool problems with the foster care worker.   
 
In some cases, the foster child may need to remain  in his same school.  As a foster parent, you would be 
required to assure appropriate transp ortation is provided, particularly if the child’s school is outside of 
your current school district. 
 
D.  EDUCATIONAL SERVICES  
 
Certain educational services are allo wed for foster children who are in need of this service, or who have 
the motivation and capacity to utilize the service.   Prior approval from the agency is required.  The 
list of educational services is as follows: 
 
Tutoring  
 
The purpose of  tutoring services is to assist a chil d when the child's academic progress is threatened.   
Efforts of the child, the foster pare nt, the teacher and the free tutoring  resources available in the family/ 
community must be used to help the child avoid academic failure.   
 
Foster Parents should discuss with the child’s worker,  the amount of time the foster parent is required to 
spend assisting a child in schoolwo rk when is behind in school.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 6. School 
Section No./Name School 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 39 	
 
 
Summer School
 
Examples include remedial courses offered through th e public school system for the child to rectify a 
failing grade and special college short courses for gift ed and talented students offered by a state college 
or university.  A child may also ta ke courses to graduate on schedule , to graduate early or to get on 
grade level.  Also, Driver’s Education  is considered a summer school course. 
 
Vocational Training  
This service is available to foster children age 16 or  older wishing to attend a public or state educational 
facility. 
 
College 
Limited payments for college education are available to foster children 18 y ears or older who have 
shown the potential and motivatio n to pursue higher learning.  Special approval is required and the 
youth is also required to apply  for grants and scholarships. 
 
Private or Home School 
Private school tuition and fees ar e not reimbursable.  Regular school supplies may be reimbursable.  The 
agency must consent to enrollmen t in a private or home school. 
 
E.  SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
 
School supplies are any expenses related to educationa l needs other than educational services associated 
with enrollment as listed above.  Prior to shopping contact the child’s worker for the allowable 
money limits for school supplies.   The following may be claimed as school supplies, if included on the 
child’s school supply list. 
  9 Items specifically required by the  school or college, including tablets, notebooks, pens, pencils, 
school bags, folders, books, art supplies, tools  for trade school, etc.  There is a limit on the 
purchase of school items, for elementary and  high school students, for the beginning of the 
school year.  Replacement items may be purchased, as  they are needed.  If the cost of a child’s 
initial school supply list exceeds that  of the limit, items not needed by the child until later in the 
school year may be purchased at  a later date and claimed as a separate expense.  High cost 
school items such as back packs, calculato rs, specialized art supplies and home economic 
supplies, for example, may also be claime d as separate expenses when necessary. 
9  Gym clothes, costumes and uniforms (e.g., band or sports) needed for school, scouting and 
camping, when these cannot be worn as everyday cl othing.  This includes purchase of material 
and sewing supplies if the item is to be made.  Uniforms required for  trade school and 
vocational training  may be considered as school supplie s.  However, uniforms for full-time 
school wear are considered part  of the regular clothing budget and are not reimbursable.   
9  Insurance, when required by the sc hool to participate in athletics and health insurance offered by 
a vocational school or college (in some instan ces, insurance is included in the tuition fee). 
9  Club dues for elementary and high school sponsored clubs.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 6. School 
Section No./Name School 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 40 	
 
 	
9
 Fees for school sponsored day field trips (does not include senior trip or school sponsored out-of-
state trips). 
9  Educational/learning toys, if the toy meets an identified educational, developmental or 
socialization need of the chil d.  The child’s teacher should id entify and make recommendations 
in writing regarding the need.  Also  the foster parent is expected to use the toy to work with the 
child on an ongoing basis to improve weak areas.   
9  A limited amount of money may be allowed thr ough the high school senior year for special 
expenses of the senior year and graduation.   This may cover class ring, yearbook, invitations, 
diploma fee, rental of cap and gown, senior pict ures, etc.  The foster care worker and foster 
parent should work together with the child to ma ke the best choice as to how to use this money. 
9  Yearbooks and school pictures for each school y ear.  (Note.  School pictures can only be 
purchased once each school year.)  A picture is to  be provided to the child’s worker and the 
child’s parents. 
9  School snacks or special contributions  for school parties or special events; 
9  Room and board, including dorm fees and meal  tickets for students in vocational training or 
college. 
9  Clothing needed for a special school event that  cannot be worn as everyday clothing.  This 
includes purchase of a formal or material to sew a  formal and rental of a tuxedo or purchase of a 
suit for a prom, special dance or other spec ial occasion and rental of cap and gown for 
graduation.  Clothing for two spec ial school events other than graduation are allowed per school 
year. 
9  Diploma or other graduation f ees for high school students. 
9  Diploma fees for college students  are included as part of the tuition as an educational service. 
9  Transportation to school when this is not pr ovided or reimbursed by the school board.  This 
includes transportation to grade school, high  school, summer school, vocational school and 
college, as well as transportati on provided by foster parents to  enable the foster child to 
participate in extracurricular activ ities or continue to attend previous school prior to foster care 
entry. 
9  Band instrument when band is an elective  or part of the curriculum at school. 
 
Band Instruments  
Before the agency will authorize the purchase of a mu sical instrument, the foster care worker and foster 
parent must assess carefully whether the child has a genui ne interest in music.  If, after an instrument is 
purchased for a foster child, the child quits the band or  moves from the foster home, the instrument must 
be  returned  to the agency, or sold, with the money bei ng refunded to the agency.  The following steps 
apply when buying an instrument: 
 
• The worker or foster parent shall fi rst try to locate a used instrument. 
•  If a used instrument cannot be located, a new on e can be purchased on a rental-purchase plan.  
The rental must be for at least three months and  the rental must be able to be applied to the 
purchase price. 
•  There is a maximum allowable purchase price (inc luding insurance) permitted for an instrument.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 6. School 
Section No./Name School 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  February 2006 
Replacing July 2005 	
 
 	
Page 41 	
 
 	
• 
The usual instruments that can be purchased und er the allowed amount for band students are the 
drum, flute, clarinet, trombone and trumpet.   A saxophone or any other instrument can be 
purchased only if one can be found for the allowed amount or less. 
•  Insurance to cover damages to or loss of the  instrument must be purchased.  This can be 
purchased from the dealer or can be included as part of the foster parent’s homeowner’s 
insurance policy.  The cost of th e insurance is included in the total maximum purchase price.  
The foster parent can claim reimbursement for th e insurance if it is part of their homeowner’s 
policy.  Only one instrument will be purchased for  a foster child; therefore, the instrument must 
be insured in the event it is damaged or needs to be replaced.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 7. Adolescents 
Section No./Name Adolescents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 42 	
 
 
PART 7 - ADOLESCENTS 
 
A.  FOSTER PARENTING THE ADOLESCENT 
 
The path between 12 and 18 years can be a difficult one for any parent a\
nd child.  This is a time when 
the youth tries to become independent, but remains de
pendent on his caretakers.  He will rail against his 
parents one minute and then want to be coddled  the next.  He is maturing faster physically and 
intellectually than emotionally. 
 
The natural problems and insecurities of  teens are increased in foster children.  This is an age when a 
child thinks a lot about hi s identity.  The foster child may not know  who he is or where he is going.  An 
adolescent does not like to be  different from his friends; however,  being a foster child may sometimes 
make him feel different and ashamed. 
 
For the foster child who becomes rebellious, some of  this rebellion may have been building over years.  
Behavior cannot easily be changed by a change in envi ronment.  He will likely continue the actions that 
were problems before he came to foster care. 
 
Foster parents need special talents in caring for teens.  They need to accept the child as he is, in a non-
critical atmosphere.  They need to remember that he  has a right to make mistakes and to be angry.  Their 
purpose is to help the child set  some reasonable goals, to help him resolve his feelings about his 
biological parents and to help hi m develop self-confidence and a good image of himself.  But sometimes 
all that can be done is to house, feed and cloth him; listen if  he wants to talk, but don’t pry if he doesn’t 
and praise him when you can.  If he runs away, th ink of what you would do if he were your own child.  
You might say for example, “You cannot run from ever ything you do not like.  Let’s work things out.” 
 
Be supportive.  Keep your sense of humor.  Take re bellion as a sign of becoming independent.  Set few 
but reasonable limits.  Teens may resent controls,  but respect your consistency.  You may seek help 
from other foster parents or the ch ild’s worker.  Caring for teens can be  a rewarding area of foster care.  
Do not disengage or ignore the adolescents  as they still need your care and attention. 
 
Foster parents play a central role in helping adoles cents prepare for life after foster care.  The youth’s 
preparation for independence works best in a family  setting.  Foster parents have the most knowledge 
and contact with the young person in the home.  They are expected to guide youth and teach them skills 
for living on their own.  Foster parents become the  teachers of youth for the following daily living tasks: 
-Obtaining food and clothing      -Cooking    -Planning meals 
-Washing and drying clothes      -Manag ing money  -Using public transportation 
-Obtaining health care    -Filling  out forms  -Locating a part-time job 
-Finding appropriate socializ ation services    -Shoppi ng for household items, etc. 
 
While the list may seem lengthy, it only represents  a portion of the topics parents teach children on a 
daily basis.  Foster  parents are an integral part  of the team that prepares adolescents for independent 
living.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 7. Adolescents 
Section No./Name Adolescents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 43 	
 
 
B.  DRIVING  
 
The agency can give permission to the Louisiana Drive
r’s License Bureau for a foster child to obtain a 
learner’s permit or a driver’s license on a case-by-case  basis.  Because the agency and the foster parents 
can be held ultimately liable for any damages caused  by a foster child in any accident, the decision to 
permit a foster child to obtain a lic ense or permit must be carefully weighed.  Consideration is only 
given to youth 16 years or older,  who are participating in independent living services, who have 
completed a driver’s education course, and who ar e mature enough according to the foster parent, the 
worker, supervisor and District Manager to handle th e responsibility that comes with the privilege of 
driving.  Only the District Manager may give fi nal approval.  Following the District Manager’s 
approval, the worker would obtain  the youth’s legal parents’ permission for the youth to receive his 
permit/license. 
 
Before foster parents make a decision to permit a fo ster child to drive their car or another car, they 
should keep in mind that they can be  held liable for any damages incurred.  The agency, because of its 
contractual agreements with the fo ster parents can through legal measures recoup any monies it has 
expended as the result of damages or injury caused by  a minor foster child to foster parents; therefore, 
the agency must hold foster parents responsible for  consistently, reasonably and adequately supervising 
the actions of a foster child under their care. 
 
The general liability insurance policy for foster pare nts does not cover automobiles; therefore, it has 
been recommended by the agency’s Bureau of Gene ral Counsel that foster parents obtain $300,000 
worth of liability insurance.  The agency cannot reimburse foster parents for the cost of the automobile 
insurance.  However, the foster child should be enc ouraged to help pay the cost of insurance through 
part-time employment. 
 
In those situations where a biologica l parent signs for the foster child to get a license and purchases the 
car for the foster child, that biological parent is e xpected to purchase liability insurance in the amount of 
$300,000. 
 
It is required that a foster child enrolls in Drive r’s Education prior to receiving a driver’s license.  
Payment of Driver’s Education classes ma y be approved as an education service. 
 
C.  EMPLOYMENT 
 
Most children, as they grow  older, feel a need for an expression  of some degree of independence and a 
desire to “prove themselves”.  A  paying job can provide the teenage fo ster child with an opportunity to 
develop valuable independent living skills.  Allowing  the child to accept employment is a decision that 
should be made jointly with the child’s worker.  Th ere are many facets to this decision that should be 
considered.  For example, will working interfere with  the child’s school schedule and the preparation of 
his homework?  Will the working hours allow the child adequate rest?

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 7. Adolescents 
Section No./Name Adolescents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 44 	
 
 
A foster child wishing to earn money through babysitti
ng must be at least 15 years old and must first 
obtain approval from his foster care worker.  Overnight babysitting is not permitted.  Prior to being 
permitted to baby sit, the child shall complete a baby  sitting course through a local hospital, cooperative 
extension service agency, or other  community program, if offered.  (N OTE:  A foster child cannot be 
left “in charge” of another child within three years  of his age, or more than two children at a time.) 
 
When a child placed in foster care  provides child care either in or out of his home, the foster parent 
should contact him at least once during the time he is  supervising other children and should make certain 
the child knows how to reach the foster parent or some other designated adult,  in case of an emergency. 
 
If a child placed in foster care baby sits with  other children in the foster home, he should receive 
payment from the foster parent, including those times  when the foster parent receives reimbursement 
from OCS for approved baby sitting expenses. 
 
If you and the child’s worker decide  that employment is feasible for the foster child, it will be your 
responsibility to watch for changes in  attitude and behavior and help make the decision as to the benefit 
the child will derive from working. 
 
It is also very important for the fo ster parent to keep the foster care worker informed of how much a 
foster child earns since this must be tracked by the ag ency to determine if the child remains eligible for 
federal benefits, if applicable.   
 
D.  DATING 
 
It is the foster parent’s  responsibility to decide at  what age and with whom a  foster child should date.  
The child’s level of maturity should be a determining  factor.  You need to discuss your decision with the 
foster care worker. 
 
E.  EDUCATIONAL/VOCATIONAL NEEDS 
 
Foster children in adolescence must establish goals  aimed at assuming and maintaining self-support as 
young adults when there is a reasonab le expectation of this.  The child’s worker and the foster parents 
should discuss the available altern atives with the adolescent and help him set realistic goals. 
 
Teenagers with little interest or motivation to ach ieve high standards in an academic setting should be 
helped toward participation in vocational training.  This includes a pprenticeship programs, vocational or 
trade schools, armed services and Job Corps.   The agency helps the child achieve self-support by 
arranging for his care and suppor t while securing job training. 
 
When a child has shown the motivation and the capab ility of achieving academically, the agency may 
provide financial assistance for the child to attend  a state university or college until he reaches age 21.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 7. Adolescents 
Section No./Name Adolescents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 45 	
 
 
F.  PLANNING FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING 
 
The foster child, foster parents a
nd foster care worker shall begin  planning for the child’s independent 
living as soon as the child reaches adolescence.  The service plan developed with the teenage foster child 
shall include planning for th e educational/vocational need s and goals to reach self-supporting capability.   
 
When a child reaches age 18, he is  by law an adult and can no longer reta in the legal status of foster 
child.  It is recognized however, that many former fo ster children (and other children) at age 18 are not 
fully prepared to live independently.  The OCS Y oung Adult Program (YAP) is available to former 
foster children who need additional support until ag e 21.  The 18 year old foster child must meet all 
YAP requirements and must enter into a voluntary co ntract with the agency until he completes the 
college/vocational training plan or  until the child reaches age 21.  There  are some special issues to be 
resolved when the foster child reaches his senior year in high school. 
 
G.  PLANNING FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 
 
There are specific school expenses  related to high school graduation.  Foster parents and the child’s 
worker should work together with the child to make th e best choices as to how to use the allotted funds. 
Refer to Part 7 Section E. School Supplies to determ ine items, directly related to graduation, that are 
paid by the agency. 
 
H.  PLANNING FOR COLLEG E/VOCATIONAL TRAINING 
 
College education or vocational training must be obtai ned from a state or public educational facility if 
state funds will be used for tuition and other fees.  Th e foster child must be at least 16 years of age in 
order to be approved for vocational training.  The  approval process for a foster child’s college or 
vocational training plan is as follows: 
 
• The foster child must explore all alternative so urces of funding, such as PELL Grants, loans, 
scholarships, TOPS, Louisiana  Rehabilitation Services, etc.; 
•  When the foster child completes the ACT Assessmen t in order to attend a state college, the child 
is asked to state on the ACT form three colle ges he wants to receive his ACT scores; and 
•  If the foster child has a physical  or emotionally disability, the child may be eligible for assistance 
through Louisiana Rehabilitation Services.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 8. Lifebooks 
Section No./Name Lifebooks 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 46 	
 
 
PART 8 - LIFEBOOKS 
 
A.  REASONS A CHILD NEEDS A LIFEBOOK 
 
Children in foster care have many experiences, acqua
intances and relationships but often they do not 
have clear memories of their past.  Each time they  leave a family, biological, foster or adoptive, they 
have memories of the people, events and feelings a ssociated with those periods of their lives.  Foster 
parents and foster care workers can a nd must assist foster children to retain their past and assist them to 
move on to the future. 
 
A Life Book records a child’s family and placement hi story.  It is used to gather information about the 
child’s growth and development, feelings, ideas,  as well as hopes and dreams for the future.  A Life 
Book is very different from a scrapbook or memory book  in that it is the personal life story of a child 
which captures memories, feelings and thoughts as well  as concrete information.  A Life Book is to be 
prepared for each child entering foster care  and is to begin at the time of placement. 
 
Betsy Keefer and Jayne Schooler in Telling the Truth to Your Adopted and Foster Child  state seven 
important reasons a child needs a Life Book. 
  1.  It recreates a child’s life history – an accurate record of their past. 
  2.  It gives a child information about his bi rth family – a child needs positive and negative 
       information about his family. 
  3.  It give reasons for placement – provide accurate and honest information about why 
       they are in foster care; provide  accurate information about his placements. 
  4.  It provides photos and  a pictorial history – records child’s development and life 
       events. 
  5.  It records the child’s feelings about hi s life – a record of his personal thoughts or 
       feelings. 
  6.  It gives the child information about hi s development – records important milestones, 
       like a baby book. 
  7.  It is a useful tool when working with a  child – allows all individuals involved with the 
       child  a method to organize the information. 
 
B.  DEVELOPING A LIFE BOOK 
 
Foster parents are required to assist the agency in  the on-going process of developing the child’s Life 
Book.  It becomes a part of the child’s possessions  and accompanies the child when the child moves 
from the foster home.  If the foster parent is help ing the child complete the Life Book, then the foster 
parent should maintain the Life Book in a secure  place or in the case of an older child, help the child 
locate a place for safe keeping.  The foster parent  and child are to bring the Life Book to the Family 
Team Conference (FTC) so that updat ed information can be copied, so information can be replaced if 
the Life Book is lost, stolen or destroyed.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 8. Lifebooks 
Section No./Name Lifebooks 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 47 	
 
 
 
 
Information to be Compiled by Foster Parents 	
9 Visits with birth relatives 
9  Developmental milestones 
9  Common childhood diseases 
9  Immunizations 
9  Information about inju ries, illnesses, or 
hospitalizations 
9  Ways the child showed affection 
9  What child did when he was happy or 
excited 
9  What things child was afraid of 
9  Favorite friends, activities and toys 
9  Birthday and religious celebrations 
9  Pictures of each foster family, their 
home and their pets  9
 Trips taken with the foster parents 
9  Members of the foster parents’ 
extended family who were important to 
the child 
9  Cute things the child did  
9  Nicknames 
9  Family pets 
9  Names of teachers and schools attended 
(pictures, if possible) 
9  Report cards 
9  Special sporting activities the child may 
have been involved with 
9  Special activities, such as scouting, 
clubs, or camping experiences 
9  Church and Sunday school experiences 	
Fahlberg MD, Vera I.  A Child’s  Journey Through Placement.  Indianapolis, IN:  Perspective Press, 1991.	 
 
The above listed information may not be a total listing  of information that can be included in the child’s 
Life Book.  Additional information, such as the following, can also be included:  foster care worker’s 
name, school pictures, achievement awards, school ev ents, letters, birthday cards, drawings by the child, 
etc.  The child’s worker will also  be working with the child and ad ding material to the book.  It is 
important that the child know that th e Life Book tells a story, he is the leading character and the book is 
available for him to look at when he wants. 
 
The Life Book should be kept in a secure location; th is will help to protect it from loss or damage by 
other children or the foster child du ring periods of anger or depression.  Its value should be stressed to 
the child.  It is not  so important how fancy or expensive the Life  Book is, but rather the personal effects 
and information contained within.   The child should work jointly with  his worker and foster parent in 
adding to the Life Book. 
 
Foster parents should help the child be proud of thei r history, yet also understand with whom the Life 
Book should be shared.  Explaining that the book is  private and personal and other children may not 
understand some of the personal  information in it, will prevent inappropriate sharing of private 
information.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 48 	
 
 
PART 9 – RESPONSIBILITI
ES AS TEAM MEMBERS
 
A.  WORKING TOGETHER:  THE PARTNE RSHIP BETWEEN THE FOSTER PARENTS, 
OCS AND THE BIRTH PARENTS 
 
Foster care is a team effort involvi ng the agency, child, foster parents,  and biological parents.  The goal 
is for all members of the team to work together for the best interests of the child.  The degree of 
cooperation, trust and shared responsibility among  members of the team will greatly influence the 
quality of the foster  care experience. 
 
When you have questions or concerns, you should talk to the child’s worker.  Good communication is 
crucial, and all team members are responsible fo r keeping the lines of communication open.  Since you 
are with the child more than anyone  else at this time in his life, your role as a team member requires 
sharing with the agency your  insight about the child. 
 
Everyone has a special job, and an effective  team depends on each member understanding his 
responsibilities.  It is only th rough cooperation that the special n eeds and care of the child can be 
accomplished.  All members of the partnership must  focus on how the needs of the child can be met. 
 
B.  ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF FOSTER PARENTS 
 
Foster parenting is an opportunity  for you to make a difference in a child ’s life during a time of crisis.  
Regardless of the experiences fost er parents have had with their own children, they often find foster 
parenting very different.  Foster  parenting may involve handling severa l children, of different ages and 
with many different needs, at one time.  It involve s the acceptance of the total child, regardless of their 
problems, history, needs, fears and ability to love.   Foster parents also have a special relationship and 
responsibility that other parents do  not have.  They have legal obligations to the agency, biological 
parents and foster children. 
 
Foster parents, as temporary car egivers, are responsible for providing the child with daily care, 
supervision, discipline and a positive family life e xperience.  The responsibilities include those tasks 
related to the care of the child, cooperating with th e agency, mentoring and assisting biological parents 
in learning to better care for their child and maintaining/completing requirements necessary for 
certification and/or re-cer tification.  The responsibil ities to care for the child include the following: 
 
Child Development  
Provide the child with tools needed  for developmental activities.  Promote the child’s relationship with 
biological parents when this is appr opriate.  Help prepare the child phys ically and emotionally for return 
to his family or to another permanent placement  as determined by the agency.  Do not compare the 
foster child’s development to other children; rath er look at each child individually as each child has 
different needs.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 49 	
 
 
Practicing Confidentiality
 
Maintaining confidentiality is a key requirement of  a professional foster parent.  When asked about the 
child’s placement in your home, keep your explanati ons simple and positive, such as, you are providing 
care for the child until he can return  to live with his family.  Do not introduce the child as your foster 
child; he may be sensitive to his current status and  does not like to be constantly identified as a foster 
child.  Negative information can be very damaging to  the child’s reputation in the community.  It is good 
to help the child develop and practice what he will tell other people about himself when or if they ask.  
Think ahead of time of the kinds of situations in which the child may be  required to talk about himself or 
his family background and plan for  what you and the child can say.  When you must inform people of 
the child’s status, it is better to  say, “I am his foster parent”, ra ther than “he is a foster child”. 
 
Court  
Foster parents have the right to  attend court hearings and to be h eard regarding the children in their 
home in accordance with the Louisiana Children’s Code regulations.  They ar e the most knowledgeable 
of the child’s day-to-day f unctioning, behavior, etc. a nd are encouraged to inform  the court of the child’s 
progress and well being.  The foster  parent shall be notified and invited to the court hearing by the 
child’s OCS worker. 
 
OCS Form 427  
This agreement specifies the respons ibilities and requirements for foster parents.  It is completed and 
signed at the time of the initial certificati on and thereafter, at re-certifications.   
 
Re-certification  
Foster parents must adhere to and complete the regulations set forth by the Minimum Licensing 
Requirements for Child Placing Agenci es With and Without Adoption Programs , OCS Form 427 
(Agreement for Foster Family Services), OCS Fo rm 604 (Foster/Adoptive Home Recertification) and 
OCS Form HDU 5 (Foster/Adoptive Home Evaluation for  Environmental, Health and Fire Safety).  The 
stated forms are located in the A ppendix Section.  Foster families must annually complete the required 
15 hours of in-service training or non-compliance of  these criteria can result in your home being 
decertified and closed.   
 
Team Involvement  
Prepare for and take part in all Family Team Confer ences pertaining to the child.  With the agency, child 
and child’s family, assist in deve loping the child’s service plan and visitation plan; then follow through 
with the actions of the plan.  Provide the foster care worker with  information regarding the child.   
 
Transportation  
Provide transportation to doctor/ dental/therapy appointments, visits, school activities, etc. 
 
C.  ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES  OF FOSTER CARE WORKERS 
 
The foster care worker represents OCS and has the  responsibility for leading the team members in 
planning and caring for the foster  child.  The worker serves as your contact person a nd will be the

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 50 	
 
 
individual responsible for managi
ng your foster child’s case.  Any questions or concerns should be 
directed to the worker.  If you cannot  reach the worker, contact their Supervisor or the District Manager. 
 
The following include the worker’s responsibilitie s in planning and caring for the foster child: 
 
Availability  
The worker is available to assist you and to monito r the child’s placement your home.  The worker is to 
provide to foster parents their work and home phone  numbers as well as the supervisor’s work and home 
phone numbers. 
 
Case Plan  
The worker manages the periodic review, assessment and updating of  the case plan with the child, 
family, foster parents and other participants; make s decisions regarding the permanent plans for the 
child, which may include return of the child to the  biological family, release for adoption or permanent 
care; and prepares and supports the child, foster parents and biolog ical parents for accomplishment of 
the permanency plan. 
 
Day-to-Day Care 
The worker is to select an appropriate placement that  best meets the child’s needs; oversee the day-to-
day care of the child while in the foster home; inform s the foster parent of current agency procedures 
that impact the daily care of the child; obtains serv ices; and continuously ascertains whether or not the 
child’s physical and emotional needs are adequately being met. 
 
Legal Relationship 
The foster care worker acts as le gal guardian for the child placed with  the agency; is a representative of 
the legal guardian; prepares for a nd attends periodic court reviews and Family Team  Conferences of the 
child’s case and plan; manages the service delivery of the ca se plan with the child and/or family; gives 
notice to the child’s foster/adoptive parents of their ri ghts to appear at each case and permanency review 
hearing. 
 
Necessary Services  
The worker completes and provides the foster pare nt with an Authorization for Emergency Medical 
Services (OCS Form 98-A), at the time of placemen t, which authorizes emergency medical care or 
surgery for the child; provides immunization record s and assures that annual exams are completed; 
arranges/informs/assists foster parent s regarding services required by the child; provides and/or requests 
approval for requested services. 
 
Visitation  
Supports relatives’ and siblings’ rights to reasonable visitation unless restricted  or denied by the court.  
Visits the child at least monthly unl ess otherwise indicated.  Visits with  the foster parent shall occur at 
least monthly with at least one visit every three m onths occurring in the foster home unless otherwise 
indicated.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 51 	
 
 
D.  RESPONSIBILITIES OF BIOLOGICAL PARENTS 
 
Involvement of the biological parents will vary from
 case to case, but the importance of the biological 
parents to the child should never be minimized.  Pare ntal cooperation and participation in the placement 
of their child in foster care are es sential in helping to relieve the ch ild’s fears, anger and guilt about 
separation from them.  Alleviating th e biological parents’ fears about the child’s placement will in turn 
allow the biological parents to be more supportive of their child’s p\
lacement. 
 
The biological parents’ respons ibilities are as followed: 
 
Case Plan  
Participate in the development of  a service plan for family members  and cooperate in working toward 
the goals of the plan. 
 
Communication  
Keep the agency informed of current family situation.  Keep appointments, respond to calls and 
maintain communication with the child. 
 
Emotional Support  
Provide emotional support for the child. 
 
Financial Responsibility  
Assume financial support of th eir child, wherever possible. 
 
Reunification/Permanency  
Work toward the return of the child to their family  by dealing with the factors that required the child’s 
removal and/or work toward achieving alternative permanency planning for the child. 
 
Visitation   
Maintain regular visitation with the child. 
 
E.  PERMANENCY PLANNING 
 
The Permanency Planning policies of the agency ensure  that work to develop a permanent plan for the 
child begins as soon as placement occu rs in foster care.  The job of planning for permanency of a child 
requires the talents of many people.   Foster parents are always a part of the permanency planning effort. 
 
The first choice of a permanent plan is to restore the  child’s family so that he may be returned.  Not all 
children can be returned  home; so another permanent plan must be developed.  Other plans may be: 
•  Make the child available for adoption so  he may be placed with adoptive parents; 
•  Transfer custody of child to relatives; 
•  Transfer child’s custody or legal guardianship to  foster parents or to non-certified caretaker not 
related to the child; or

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 52 	
 
 	
• 
Arrange for the child’s well bein g and protection in a safe and stable environment in an 
alternative permanent living arrangement (until he is 18) while planning for his independence. 
 
F.  CONCURRENT PLANNING 
 
Efforts are made to place children with families w ho can provide permanent placements for them should 
they be unable to return to their  parent’s custody.  This may involve  placing children with relatives who 
are willing to adopt or accept custody.  Children who ar e not placed with relatives, but are at risk of not 
being returned to their parents, are placed with re source homes (foster/adoptive families who are dually 
certified).  Foster parents with whom the child is li ving will be considered as an adoption resource if 
those foster parents are willing to co mmit to permanent care for the child. 
 
G.  CASE PLANNING PROCESS 
 
The case planning process is used to structure and  document the on-going effort by OCS staff and other 
team members.  The purpose of the case plan is to  assist the worker, supervisor, child, parents, foster 
parents/caretakers and the court to work towards the goals of safety, permanency and well being to the 
degree possible for children in the family using  the available resources.  The formal case plan is 
developed based on an assessment of the family’s stre ngths and needs, reasons the child came into care, 
barriers preventing return to the family and the child’s  needs.  The child’s health and safety shall be a 
paramount concern in the development of the case pla n.  Foster parents are in an excellent position to 
evaluate the child’s current needs  and to contribute this information  during the case planning process.  
The case plan is developed with parents, child and fo ster parents/caregivers and finalized at the Family 
Team Conference. 
 
H.  FAMILY TEAM CONFERENCE (FTC) 
 
Family Team Conferences offer the opportunity for  formally identifying any barriers to the child 
returning home or otherwise achievi ng a permanent plan and for finalizing a service plan for the family 
and child to overcome these barriers.  At each FTC, responsibilities for all team members, including the 
child when appropriate, are decided.  The plan shall  be specific in terms of the overall permanent goal, 
objectives required to achieve the goal, tasks required  to achieve the objectives, services to be provided, 
participants’ responsibili ties and timeframes for completion.  Foster  parents are encouraged to discuss 
with the foster care worker, the child’s case plan and  services they are to provide in case plan.  Foster 
parents are to encourage participatio n of the child and/or biological parents, as appropriate, in the FTC 
case planning process.  An FTC is  held within 30 days of a child entering agency custody and every six 
months thereafter until permanency is achieved. 
 
I.  COURT HEARINGS 
 
The Louisiana Children’s Code provides for Judicial  Review of all children placed in agency custody.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 53 	
 
 
Case Review Hearings are held at 
six month intervals from the time a child is placed in agency 
custody.  These hearings give the Judge an opportunity  to review the child’s case plan and to determine 
if it protects the child’s health and safety  and is in the child’s best interest. 
 
Permanency Hearings  are within 12 months  of a child being placed in agency custody and at a 
minimum of annually thereafter.  The purpose of the  Permanency Hearing is to determine the permanent 
plan for the child that is most appropriat e and in the best interest of the child. 
 
Foster parents have the right and are encouraged to  attend and provide information at their foster child’s 
case and permanency review hearings.  The child’s worker is responsible fo r notifying you of the day, 
place and time of the hearing. 
 
J.  VISITS BETWEEN CHILD AND FAMILY MEMBERS 
 
For the well being of most children, visits with their  biological families are essential.  Parental visitation 
can be denied only at the discretion  of the court.  Visitation is important to the child in maintaining his 
union with his biological family. 
 
The plan for visitation is created and a schedule is esta blished in the Family Team Conferences.  It is the 
responsibility of the foster care worker, the foster parent, and the biological parents to develop this 
contract.  Visitation plans consider a convenient time  and place for family visits and are made according 
to the child’s individual needs.  Foster parents ar e extremely important in helping children maintain 
contact with their families.  However, all visitati on and changes in visitation are arranged through the 
child’s worker. 
 
Whenever possible, family visits in the biological  parents’ or foster parents’ home are encouraged.  
When this is not possible, visits may be arranged in  a neutral setting, such as a park.  Except in certain 
circumstances, visits are usually not held in OCS of fices.  Foster parents are generally responsible for 
transporting foster children to and from visits.  Th ey should share their observation of these visits with 
the foster care worker. 
 
Foster children should not be allowed to leave the fo ster home with their biological family without prior 
notification to and approval by the  agency.  Foster parents should not use force against a biological 
parent to prevent unauthorized removal, as doing so might be dangerous to the foster child and/or the 
foster parent.  If forcible unauthorized removal o ccurs, the foster parent should immediately call the 
police and the child’s worker. 
 
The foster child may become anxious prior to the  visit with his biological parent or be upset and 
unhappy after the visit.  Despite these problems, you  must be aware of how important the biological 
parents are to the child.  Most foster children miss thei r biological parents.  Through visits they are able 
to maintain ties with their family.   The more the child visits his biological family, the better he will be 
able to adjust in your home.  If  visits are extremely upsetting, you should discuss this with the child’s 
worker.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 9. Responsibilities As Team Members 
Section No./Name Responsibilities As Team Members 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 54 	
 
 
 
The foster child’s feelings of being separated fro
m his biological parents are renewed following visits 
with them.  The visits are necessary  because they allow the child opport unities to act out and to resolve 
many of his feelings about his biol ogical family and being separated fr om them.  This allows him to 
continue emotional growth and development. 
 
The child can be helped to maintain a feeling of c ontact with his family by taking a picture of him with 
his parents during a visit a nd being allowed to display  the picture in the foster home.  Also helping him 
to send Valentine cards, Christmas cards and an occasio nal letter to his family will give him a feeling of 
contact with his family.  It is important to  report all contacts to the child’s worker. 
 
Even if biological parents are unable to care for th eir child, most will want to know how the child is 
doing.  It is helpful to take his  school papers and pictures to visi ts, so his parents can enjoy them. 
 
K.  VISITS BETWEEN FOSTER CARE WO RKER, CHILD AND FOSTER PARENT 
 
Visits between the foster care worker and the child, as  well as visits between the foster care worker and 
foster parents are necessary.  Visits  are defined as any face-to-face cont act.  Visiting with the child on 
the same date as a visit with the foster parent may occur, provided the worker  and the child have an 
opportunity to visit privately.  Th e purpose of the visits are to assess and monitor the care the child 
receives, including the child’s safety , clothing, physical environment, education progress, health needs, 
lend support to the foster parent, etc. 
 
L.  VOLUNTEER AND  VISITING RESOURCES 
 
Children in various foster care se ttings often have individuals from  the community come forth as a 
volunteer or as a visiting resource.  A volunteer is a person who has  no personal connections to a child, 
but is willing to spend time with a  child through referral from or contacts with a program in which the 
child is receiving services.  A vi siting resource is a person who has  a personal connection to a foster 
child through kinship or personal contacts in routine daily life.  These interactions can be very positive 
experiences for the children.  However, there are re quirements, which individuals must meet prior to 
working or visiting with a foster ch ild without the foster parents’ supervision.   These individuals must 
be approved by the agency prior to contact with the  child, as a volunteer or a visiting resource.  Discuss 
with the child’s OCS worker any programs or persons meeting the above stated description.  
 
M.  COURT APPOINTED  SPECIAL ADVOCATE (CASA)  
 
A CASA is a trained community vol unteer, appointed by the Juvenile Court Judge to represent the best 
interests of abused/neglected children involved in c ourt proceedings.  The volunteer is to get to know the 
child and then let the Judge and others in the system know the child’s perspective and the child’s needs.  
CASA volunteers talks with the chil d, parents, family members, foster parent(s) and others who are 
knowledgeable about the child.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 55 	
 
 
PART 10 – ISSUES PERTIN
ENT TO FOSTER PARENTS 
 
A.  MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR FO STER AND ADOPTIVE FAMILY HOMES 
 
The Bureau of Licensing and Louisiana laws set fo rth mandated requirements for foster and adoptive 
homes.  In addition to being in  compliance with the law, the purpose of the agency’s minimum 
certification standards is to ensure  that OCS foster/adoptive homes best  meet the health, safety and well-
being needs of children placed in foster care. 
 
The agency’s minimum certification standards for foster  and adoptive homes are listed as detailed rules 
and regulations in the  Minimum Licensing Requirements for Child  Placing Agencies With and Without 
Adoption Programs handbook .  OCS is responsible for training and certifying the agency’s 
foster/adoptive families.  Each foster parent is  provided a copy of the licensing handbook when they are 
certified.  If you need a copy, please c ontact your Home Development worker. 
 
The agency also has additional policy requirements wh ich must be met for certification.  These can be 
found in Foster Parent Agreement  (OCS Form 427).  The licensing stan dards and agency policies were 
discussed with you during the pre-service training a nd the home study process.  They will also be 
discussed during the re-c ertification process. 
 
B.  RE-CERTIFICATION 
 
Foster homes undergo a re-certification study after the  first six months *and in one year from the six 
months re-certification.  After the first yearly re-certification, foster homes are re-certified at least 
annually, unless it is determined that the home con tinues to meet re-certification requirements on an on-
going basis and therefore may be re-certified for a three year period.  There must be an annual home 
visit.**  The purpose of the re-certification is to dete rmine how the foster home can best be used in the 
future and to assure that the conditions under which  children in OCS custody are living are safe and well 
functioning.  Each foster parent is  expected to cooperate with the Home Development Unit to complete 
the re-certification process by the annual date.  Timely  re-certification of your home is of the utmost 
importance as it may affect the chil d’s eligibility for federal funding and the agency’s licensing status.   
 
At the time of re-certific ation, the Home Development  Unit will need the following: 
9  Current physical exams on all members of th e household (excluding the foster child) 
every three years; 
9  Pet immunization records; 
9  Car insurance and license tag verification; 
9  Documentation of 15 completed hours of  ongoing in-service training per year; 
9  Available child care plan and support system; 
9  Compliance with necessary information to co mplete the re-certification process; and 
9  Income verification.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 56 	
 
 
It is your responsibility to prov
ide the Home Development worker  with the above items by the date 
requested.  If above requested information is  not provided, your home could be decertified. 
 
C.  IN-SERVICE TRAINING 
 
Annual training for foster parents is required for re-certification.   Foster parents must complete a 
minimum of 15 hours of approved in-service training each year.  Completion of the 15 hours of training 
must occur per fiscal year, July 1 - June 30.  In tw o parent households, the hours may be shared between 
the foster parents; however, each pa rent must receive a minimum of five  hours, with the total hours to be 
15.  Foster parents found to be out of compliance  with the in-service training requirement will be 
required to enter into a corrective action plan with  the agency that states they agree to attend the 
necessary training and specifies the names and dates of the scheduled training.   If the foster parents 
refuse to attend in-service training or fail to complete the corrective action plan, the agency may remove 
the children and close the home. 
 
Regional Office staff schedule training classes.  Foster parents are informed annually of the available in-
service topics and schedules.  OCS allows additiona l types of training, other than the regional scheduled 
classes, to count toward the 15  hours.  Foster parents are encouraged to contact their Home 
Development worker with suggested  topics or areas of training that may be pertinent in helping them 
better meet the needs of the child(ren) in their home. 
 
Additional training resources  include the following: 
•  Training/instruction periods between  foster parents and workers, can be considered for six hours 
of the required 15 annual hours.  The only app licable hours during these training/instruction 	
periods will be when the worker provides information *on**: behavior management techniques; 
child development; managing sexually explicit behaviors; cultural competency; attachment 
issues; and managing child -parent visitation.  The training hours with the worker are documented 
on the Workshop/Conference Attendance Form for  Foster Parents and Service Providers (TRN-
7).  The completed form is submitted to the Ho me Development Unit for filing in the foster 
parent record.  The remaining ni ne hours of the total 15 hours of  required in-service hours are to 
be obtained through formal  professional training. 
•  Foster parent consultations with a licensed psycho logist, psychiatrist or Licensed Clinical Social 
Worker/Professional Counselor for the purpose of  implementing an individualized behavior 
management program or other therapeutic treatm ent on behalf of a child placed in the home. 
•  Formal training received from a medical provider, wh ich is required for the foster parent to meet 
the physical needs of a child placed  or to be placed in their home, is applicable in meeting these 
in-service training hours. 
•  Foster parents may obtain thei r annual in-service training hour s at the internet website, 
www.fosterclub.com	
 or www.fosterparents.com	.  The courses are written by professionals and 
focus on foster and adoptive childre n.  To obtain training credit, the foster parents logs on to the 
website and reads the posted training material.   At the end of the training course, there is a 
questionnaire that is completed and submitted on-line.  With a return of 80% correct, a certificate 
of completion per course is e-mailed to the partic ipant.  The certificate contains the course title,

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 57 	
 
 	
hours of credit, and first and last name of the part
icipant.  For couples, each individual will need 
to complete the course material and receive a traini ng certificate.  The training certificate is to be 
submitted to the Regional Office for documenta tion of training hours.  All 15 hours can be 
obtained on the Internet. 
•  The Annual Foster Parent Conference sponsored by the Louisiana Foster and Adoptive Parent 
Association provides 15 hours of  in-service training and an opportunity to  network with other 
foster parents statewide. 
 
D.  FOSTER PARENT IDENTIFICATION 
 
When foster home approval and certification are gr anted, each parent will be given OCS Form 406, a 
Foster Parent ID card.  The card will be effective fo r the time period stated which will be one year from 	
your certification date.  A new card will be provided *** fo llowing *** re-certification. 
 
The purpose of the card is to assist the foster parent  when identification is needed to verify their official 
role as a foster parent for school, doctor appointments , etc.  It is very important not to publicly display 
the card, i.e., neck-type cardholder, as  this may be a source of embarrassment for the foster child.  The 
card is never to be given to or utilized by anyone else. 
 
E.  RESPITE AND ALTERNATIVE CHILD CARE PLANS  
 
Respite care is the temporary care of the foster child  in a certified foster home or residential care setting 
while board payments are continuing to be made to th e foster parent.  The purpose of respite is to give 
caretakers temporary relief from the care of the child.  As this is planned respite, the foster parent(s) 
must discuss with the OCS worker the arrangement s for respite as far in advance as possible. 
 
Community, free of charge, licensed re spite services may be available to foster children in very limited 
circumstances.  In most situations where temporary ch ild care is needed for a foster child, foster parents 
should rely on the child care provid er(s) who was designated during the  home certification process.  In 
situations where a foster child or fo ster parent is hospitalized and the foster parent needs child care for 
the foster children in the home, purchase of babysitti ng may be appropriate.  Regular foster parents can 
receive seven days of respite per ch ild per calendar year with worker and first line supervisory approval.  
Community respite funded through th e Medicaid waiver program must be explored for children who 
qualify.  Respite funded through the Family Resource  Centers must also be explored for children. 
 
F.  LIABILITY INSURANCE 
 
The Department of Social Services assumes limited  liability for damages caused by a foster child living 
in a foster home.  The liability insurance does not assure  foster parents that all their claims will be paid.  
A claim may be paid to the foster  parent in the following situations: 
 
• When it is shown that the placing  worker knew the child was destructive and failed to share this 
information with the foster parents;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 58 	
 
 	
• 
When the foster parent has signed a foster pare nt liability agreement which is included in the 
OCS Form 427 at the time of certification and da mages to a third party are not the result of 
negligence of the foster parent or third party. 
 
The Department of Social Services  will defend or provide protection for  foster parents for liability when 
they become legally liable or obligated to pay because  of acts of a foster child toward a third party when 
the conditions specified above are  met.  However, this indemnity doe s not apply to the foster parents 
themselves nor their home or other personal  or property damage to any household member or 
automobiles or other vehicles. 
 
G.  HOMEOWNER INSURANCE 
 
Damage by a foster child to property owned, occupied,  rented or controlled by the foster parent is the 
responsibility of the foster parent .  For this reason, foster parents  are encouraged to seek household 
insurance coverage.  Foster pare nts should clear with their insurance agent whether or not a 
homeowner’s policy or renter’s  policy would cover damages by a foster child to their house and 
possessions.  Any premium incurred by such coverage  is the responsibility of the foster parent. 
 
H.  AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
 
Louisiana law requires all automobiles to have liabil ity insurance.  DSS cannot be responsible for car 
insurance for foster children.  Although the foster parents cannot give permission  for the license, if the 
youth will be driving the foster pa rent’s car, they should be in agreement with the plan because the 
foster parents must assume the re sponsibility to provide insurance coverage for the youth.  The agency 
recommends that foster parents obtain $300,000 worth  of liability insurance for a minor youth driving 
their car.  The agency will not reimburse foster pare nts for the cost of this automobile insurance.  
However, the youth can be encouraged to help pay  the cost of insurance through part-time employment. 
 
I.  FILING A CLAIM 
 
The foster care worker is responsible for assisting  the foster parent in filing a claim whenever damages 
occur.  The claim should be forwarded through th e Regional Administrator or designee along with 
applicable documents to the Office of Risk Manage ment, Attention:  Insurance Claims Section.  The 
Office of Risk Management insurance claims adjuster  will investigate and determine if the claim will be 
reimbursed. 
 
The claim must include the following:  name, address,  and telephone number of the foster parent; date of 
claim; the claimant’s name, address and telephone  number (any third party involved in the claim for 
damages); and the name, address, parish, region  and telephone number of the worker, the worker’s 
supervisor, and the District Manage r; and any comments.  The foster parent liability agreement (OCS 
Form 427 - Standard Provisions Section) must be attach ed to the claim.  The claim must be filed with 
the Office of Risk Management as quickly as possi ble as the investigation and determination of the 
damages must be made within a year of the date the damages occurred.  Payment claims will be paid

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 59 	
 
 
directly to the person or vendor seeking reimbursemen
t for damages/repairs, rather than to the foster 
parent. 
 
J.  ADDRESS AND HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION CHANGE 
 
It is important for the foster child to maintain  meaningful contacts with his biological family.  
Consequently, if the foster parents are moving out of his parish or out-of-state, a decision must be made 
as to whether or not it is in the best interest of th e foster child to move with the foster family.  These 
decisions are made by the agency and, when appropria te, are made jointly with the court and biological 
family.  Such decisions are made on a case-by-case  basis with strong consideration being given to the 
child’s ties with his biological family, as well as th e child’s individual needs.  Foster parents must 
inform OCS staff if they plan to move  to another parish or out-of-state. 
 
The foster parents must immediat ely notify the Home Development a nd Foster Care staff should they 
move to a new residence within the same region.   The Home Development worker will make a home 
visit to your new home to determine whether or not  minimum safety standards are met.  The new review 
may result in the continuation of the current certific ation or may result in a change in the number of 
placements or a corrective action plan to address required changes. 
 
At any time an adult, 18 years or older, moves into  the foster home, the Home Development staff must 
immediately be informed.  Foster parents must also  notify staff immediately when any member of the 
household is involved in criminal acts.  Staff should conduct a criminal reco rd check and require a 
medical examination and TB test on the new household member. 
 
K.  PROBLEM RESOULTION 
 
When a foster parent has any unres olved compliant, it should first be discussed with the foster care 
worker, supervisor, District Manage r or Regional Administrator.  Then, if the complaint has not been 
resolved at the local and/or regional level, the OC S Field Liaison Section should be contacted at (225) 
342-9141. 
 
L.  FAIR HEARING 
 
A Fair Hearing is the administrativ e procedure during which a foster parent or his representative may 
present an appeal and show why it is believed that th e action or decision of the agency is not fair and 
should be corrected.  If the claim for benefits is de nied or not acted upon with reasonable promptness, a 
Fair Hearing may be requested due to  failure of the agency to reimburse certified foster parents for the 
following allowable expenses: the appropriate board pa yment, special board, or separate reimbursable 
amount for the foster child. 
 
The separate reimbursable expenses are paymen ts for initial and replacement clothing, respite, 
transportation, day care, hos pital sitters, education, in-service tr aining, socialization, and incidentals.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 60 	
 
 
Medical, dental, Alternate Family 
Care (AFC) and specialized home s ubsidies, evaluations and therapy 
are not included in the right to a Fair  Hearing in the State of Louisiana. 
 
An individual does not have  an appeal right through the Department of Social Services (DSS) Bureau of 
Appeals fair hearing process in regards to home certification or de-c ertification actions. 
 
The DSS Bureau of Appeals shall be responsible for determining if the issue fa lls within the boundaries 
of an appeal issue and for conducting the fair hearing, if appropriate. 
 
M.  NOTICE OF RIGHT TO REQUEST A FAIR HEARING 
 
 When a foster parent submits a written request  for benefits, the child’s worker must acknowledge 
receipt of the request in writing with in 30 days advising of the decision to approve or disapprove or that 
such a decision will be provided within the next 90  days.  When foster parents submit an OCS Form 435 
for reimbursement of expenses, if the amount of reimbursement is denied or reduced, then the worker 
must send notice of the decision to  deny or reduce payment requested.   The notice of decision regarding 
benefits must include the  notice of a right to reques t a Fair Hearing, the method for requesting the Fair 
Hearing and the right to be represen ted by anyone of the foster parent’s choosing in the matter of a Fair 
Hearing.  The request for a Fair Hearing must be made  in writing by the foster parent or his authorized 
representative and mailed to  the following address: 
     DSS Bureau of Appeals 
     P. O. Box 2944 
     Baton Rouge, LA  70821. 
 
The child’s worker will use OCS No tice of Decision on Request for Foster Care Benefits Form when 
rendering an adverse decision to a wr itten request for foster care benefits including the OCS Form 435.  
The form contains all requirements for  adequate notice of a Fair Hearing. 
 
N.  TIME LIMIT TO RE QUEST A FAIR HEARING 
 
A foster parent will have 30 days  from the date on the written notifi cation of denial or delay of the 
requested action to request a fair hearing.  If the request for the Fair  Hearing is post marked within 30 
days of the notification date, any  payment currently being made which is in dispute may not be reduced 
or discontinued pending the de cision of the Fair Hearing. 
 
The Bureau of Appeals is re sponsible for the following: 
•  Acknowledging in writing all writt en requests within five working days of their receipt; 
•  Accepting or rejecting all re quests for a Fair Hearing; 
•  Determining if the request is made timely for c ontinuance of payments until the Fair Hearing 
decision is rendered with the recipient responsib le for repayment should the agency decision be 
upheld; 
•  Notifying the Regional Administrato r of the appeal by memo, with instructions to prepare a 
Summary of Evidence, which includes a written summary of the information used to make the

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 61 	
 
 	
decision being contested.  The Regional Admini
strator shall also receive a copy of any 
correspondence from the foster pa rent or his representative; 
•  Notifying the foster parent and the Regional Ad ministrator of the time, date and place or 
teleconference arrangements for the hearing; 
•  The notice to the foster parent will include a stat ement that the hearing will be dismissed if the 
foster parent or his representativ e fails to appear or in the case of an agre ed upon teleconference, 
fails to participate in the hearing without good cause ; that the foster parent has the right to be 
represented by someone else, including legal counse l; and that he may bring with him anyone he 
wishes to offer evidence in his behalf; and 
•  The foster parent may request and is entitled to receive a postponement of the hearing provided 
he has good cause to do so.  Agency action shall be  postponed for as many days as the hearing is 
postponed.  When postponement occurs, the Re gional Administrator shall be notified and 
confirmation of postponement se nt to the foster parent. 
 
The hearing is presided over by an Administrative Law Judge who is an impartial DSS employee at the 
state level, not having b een involved in any way w ith the agency’s action, inaction or decision.  The 
Administrative Law Judge shall regu late the hearing consistent with due process, order any professional 
evaluation(s) needed at the agency’s expense and  provide a hearing record and recommendation to the 
Secretary of DSS or designee. 
 
The Secretary of DSS or designee  shall decide on each fair hearing in either of the following ways: 
•  Foster Parent Favor – This decisi on is rendered when the evidence  available as a result of the 
hearing supports the conclusion that the foster pare nt is entitled to his claim with regard to the 
issue.  The agency representative shall initia te action to implement the Bureau of Appeals 
directive not later than 10 days  following receipt of the directive. 
•  OCS Decision Making Upheld  – This decision is made when the  evidence available as a result of 
the hearing supports the conclusion  that the action of the responsible agency representative was 
in accordance with agency policy and the foster parent is not entitled to his claim. 
 
When the Fair Hearing decision is adverse to the foster parent, the notice of the decision will include the 
explanation that he has exhausted al l administrative remedies open to him and that he is free to pursue 
judicial review of his claim at his  own expense.  If the final hearing d ecision is unfavorable to the foster 
parent the agency may recover from the recipient th e cost of any services provided during the period of 
ineligibility. 
 
Within 30 days after the mailing of  the final decision, or, if a re-hearing is requested, within 30 days 
after the decision thereon of the Bur eau of Appeals, the foster parent may obtain judicial review of the 
decision by filing a petition in  the District Court of the parish in which th e agency office is located. 
 
O.  INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE REGULATIONS 
 
Regular board payments, level of care payments and expenses reimbursed to foster parents on behalf of 
a foster child, are not reported as  taxable income.  Specialized foster  homes that receive a subsidy each

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 10. Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 
Section No./Name Issues Pertinent to Foster Parents 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  June 2007 
Replacing May 2006 	
 
 	
Page 62 	
 
 
month in addition to the regular board 
rate do not have to report the subsidy as taxable income if there is 
a child in the foster home.  If ther e is not a child in the foster home  at least one day of a calendar month, 
the subsidy payment is taxable.  *Payment for re spite is considered taxable income.** Retainer fee 
payments made to Retainer Homes are also considered taxable income.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 63 	
 
 
PART 11 - REIMBURSEMENT 
 
A.  EXPENDITURE REIMBURSEMENT PROCESS 
 
Reimbursements may be available, based on the Agency
’s budget.  Foster parents must talk with the 
child’s foster care worker to confirm the availability of reimbursable funds  prior to making a purchase 
for a foster child when a reimbursement will be  expected.  Effective January 2006, reimbursements will 
not be made for orthodontia or tutoring as well as fo r out -of-state day care that exceeds the Louisiana 
state rate, set by the Office of Family Support. 
 
There are approvals and procedures  involved to receive reimbursement.  On a monthly basis, foster 
parents are to submit the Foster  Parent’s Supplementary Expenditure Affidavit (OCS Form 435), to 
make a claim for reimbursement to the child’s worker ; the form is listed as Appendix H.  Receipts or 
sale slips must be attached verifying purchases of  all items over $1.00.  Receipts must show the item(s) 
purchased, the date and the amount and should be  signed by the vendor (person whom item(s) was 
purchased from).  Separate receipts are necessary for each  foster child.   School supply lists must also be 
attached with receipts, if  these items were purchased.  Foster pa rents must submit odometer readings for 
reimbursement of transportation involving authorized  travel in their personal vehicle.  If the 
transportation involves more than one foster child,  the mileage is to be pro-rated for each child.  
Receipts for any public trans portation must be submitted. 
 
Form 435 and receipts are reviewed by the worker  and approved if expenditures claimed are in 
accordance with policy.  Remember to get prior author ization and expenditure amounts from the worker.  
***  Reimbursement requests submitted after a three-month timeframe may not be honored. 
 
Most medical expenses are covered  by the child’s medical card.  The child’s medical card may not cover 
certain prescription drugs and medical emergencies.  In  these situations, it is preferable for the medical 
providers to bill the agency directly.  The agen cy will then forward to the medical provider the 
appropriate payment forms.  Foster parents can  be reimbursed if the child requires the medication 
immediately.   
 
Payment and/or reimbursement may be made by check  or direct deposit.  Foster parents may enroll, 
cancel or make changes in direct deposit of thei r payments by completing the OCS DD-1 Form.  The 
form must be submitted along with documentation for  the financial institution account to which payment 
is to be directed.  Refer to Appendix H for the  OCS DD-1 Form and instructions.  Also additional 
information on direct deposit may be found in  the Administrative Manual Chapter 1, Section 1-922	
 and 
1-924	
.  
 
A separate document from the payment, called a Rem ittance Advice, is mailed at the same time that the 
payment is made to confirm payment.  The Remittance Advice is a document containing the amount and 
description of items/services for which the paymen t is being made, a Payment Information Number 
(PIN), a nine digit Payee number, and a check nu mber or a direct deposit tracking number.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 64 	
 
 
*** 
 
B.  BOARD PAYMENT 
 
Payment for the care of foster children is made once a month.  Board payment is retroactive and 
received during the middle of the month for care pr
ovided the preceding month.  The board payment is 
computed at a daily rate.  Therefore, the board pa yment will vary slightly in amount according to the 
number of days in a month.   
 
The daily foster care rate payments shall not be used for expenditures that are not part of the child’s 
needs.  The basic rate paid each month is for th e child’s shelter, food, clothing, monthly allowance, 
personal items and gift allowance.  The follo wing describes each component of the rate:  
 
Room and Board  is to defer part of the cost for the chil d to reside in the home and the provision of 
food.  The room and board amount is based upon the United States Department of Agriculture estimates 
of the cost of raising a child and budget  appropriation from the state legislature. 
 
The  clothing allowance is to be spent monthly or saved, to be used as needed for clothing (e.g. winter 
coat/clothes and summer clothes),  school uniforms, clothes for Sunday, etc.  This payment is only for 
clothing.  The agency will not regularly replace clothing.  Clothing should be purchased new and in 
keeping with community standards as appropriate to the age of the child. 
 
The  child’s monthly allowance  is to be paid directly to an age  appropriate child or placed in a piggy 
bank or account each month if the child is not paid dire ctly.  This is to occur each month for all children, 
ages 0 through 17. 
 
Personal items allowance is to cover personal items su ch as haircuts, shampoo, etc. 
 
The  gift allowance  is to be used to purchase gifts for the child. 
 
The board rate is for four age groups:  birth up to  age two; two through age five; six through age 12; and 
13 years of age or older.  The  following is a breakdown of the aver age board payment based on the age 
of the child. 
   	
   Birth up to Age 2 years    *$313.77 – room and board 
        ($15.58 per day)            61.50 – diapers 
                        61.50 – clothing 
                               9.72 – child’s monthly allowance 
                           15.37 – personal items 
                                      5.54 – gift allowance 
                          --------------- ------------------------------ 
                 $467.40 = Average Monthly Payment**

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 65 	
 
 
 	
  
Age 2 through Age 5 years    *$314.76 – room and board 
       ($13.57 per day)            61.50 – clothing 
                            9.93 – child’s monthly allowance 
                        15.38 – personal items 
                           5.53 – gift allowance 
          ----------- ---------------------------------- 
                 $407.10 = Average Monthly Payment ** 
 
   Age 6 through Age 12 years   * $324.47 – room and board 
           ($14.96 per day)            73.80 – clothing 
                           29.62 – child’s monthly allowance 
                           15.37 – personal items 
                            5.54 – gift allowance 
         ------------- ------------------------------- 
                 $448.80 = Average Monthly Payment**  
 
   Age 13 years or older         $351.31 – room and board 
        (16.70 per day)              80.38 – clothing 
                          46.70 – child’s monthly allowance 
                           16.33 – personal items 
                              6.28 – gift allowance 
            -------- ------------------------------------ 
                    $501.00 = Average Monthly Payment  
 
C.  SPECIAL BOARD PAYMENT 
 
In some instances special or extra ti me and effort on the part of the foster parent is required to care for 
and meet the needs of a child.  The child may be  physically, emotionally or mentally handicapped.  
Special board payments are based on the foster parent s’ time and effort to care for the child.  Two types 
of OCS foster homes have different  approval criteria for special board.  These are Alternate Family Care 
(AFC) and Specialized Homes.  Special board for  AFC must be approved by State Office; while any 
special board for specialized homes over $300 must be  approved by State Office.  This is necessary due 
to the agencies expectations and the additi onal monthly payments paid to these homes.  
 
D.  CLOTHES 
 
The clothes a child wears have a lot  to do with the image he has of himself.  It is essential that the 
child’s clothes be like those of your own  children and the children in the community. 
 
A child, when first placed in foster care, may be in  immediate need of clothing.  An initial clothing 
allowance may be provided only once for each child of any age at the time he first enters care.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 66 	
 
 
 
The monthly clothing allowance included in the board pa
yment is to be used to replace and add to the 
child’s clothes.  Both the initial clothing allowa nce and the monthly allowance are to be used to 
purchase school uniforms if uniforms are necessary  for school.  School uniform purchases by foster 
parents for either private or  public school attendance are not re imbursed to the foster parent. 
 
During placement, a foster child may have need fo r replacement of his clothing due to an unexpected 
circumstance.  A type of situation for which replacem ent of clothing could be considered would be if the 
child’s clothing was destroyed by fire or some other na tural disaster, or if he has a dramatic change in 
clothing size due to a significant we ight gain (i.e., pregnancy or abnormal growth) or weight loss (such 
as from illness).  Contact your foster care worker to discuss procedures and money amounts. 
 
E.  ALLOWANCES 
 
The purpose of an allowance is to help the foster  child learn to handle money.  The agency provides an 
allowance for the child in his monthly board payment.   It is important that the child receive this money 
on a regular basis.  The child should be helped to  use his money wisely and to plan ahead for his 
purchases.  This is an excellent time to introduce th e benefits of saving money in a savings account or 
other secure locations.  This allowance is not for  school lunches, personal items such as toothpaste, 
shampoo or deodorant and should never be withheld from him.   
 
When a child deliberately causes damage to property,  the child can be expected to pay for the damages 
out of his monthly allowance with  the approval of the OCS supervisor.   The child should participate in 
the development of a payment plan.  The supervisor  must approve the plan for payment of damages by 
the child.  The payment plan shall be for a portion, but not all, of the child’s allowance each month until 
the agreed upon amount is paid.  If  the child has earnings, a portion of the earnings may be used in the 
payment plan.  If the child reimburses damages, a re quest shall not be made to the agency also for 
reimbursement. 
 
Foster parents may give a foster  child extra spending money for special occasions if they wish.  You 
should not ask the foster child to use his money for  certain things, such as, when the whole family goes 
to buy ice cream or to the movies and you are trea ting everyone else; treat the foster child also. 
 
F.  GIFT ALLOWANCE 
 
The agency provides for the foster child a small  amount of money in his monthly board payment for 
gifts for the child.  You may want to  spend more on Christmas and birthdays, as you will want the foster 
child to be treated as equally as  possible with others in the home. 
 
Foster parents, by nature, are gi ving people and want to share not only their home and emotional love, 
but also, wish to give gifts to the child.  When gift s are given to the child, then those gifts become his 
possessions to take with him when he  leaves the foster home; the gift should be moveable and separate

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 67 	
 
 
from other persons.  Many foster children do not ha
ve possessions of their own.  Gifts received on 
special occasions provide the  child the opportunity to collect personal possessions.   
 
It should be remembered that gifts should  be given with no “strings attached”. 
 
G.  TRANSPORTING CHILDREN 
 
Foster parents shall comply with all the state laws  for cars including current car inspections, liability car 
insurance and child restraint systems.  All foster  children when required by age and size are to comply 
with the law and safety practices by having the appropriate child passenger rest raint systems.  Any car 
seat or other passenger restraint syst em purchased for the child becomes the property of the child just as 
any other purchase made on his behalf, i.e., clothing.  OCS provides car seats for  the child.  Discuss with 
your worker if you need OCS to  provide a car restraint system. 
 
Daily transportation is the responsibil ity of the foster parent and is not reimbursable.  The foster parent 
may be reimbursed for transportation expe nses under the following circumstances: 
•  Required or allowed by OCS for the welfare of  the child for medical and other professional 
appointments, authorized family visits or Fam ily Team Conferences within the state; and/or 
•  Free transportation to school is  not available and the local school  board will not reimburse the 
foster parent. 
 
Within policy limitations, foster parents may be reim bursed for mileage expenses incurred on behalf of 
the foster child.  To claim mileage expenses, the odo meter reading of the trip must be submitted.  Should 
more than one foster child be invo lved in the trip, e.g., sibling to a visit, foster children to medical 
appointment, etc., the trip mileage is  to be divided between the involved foster children.  An example is 
two foster children are taken to th e doctor’s office and the round trip is  12 miles.  Six miles would be 
claimed for each child on the reimbursement form.   An OCS Form 435, provided by the agency, is to be 
completed by the foster parent for reimbursement.   A separate Form 435 is completed on each child.  
Consult and discuss with your child’s wo rker allowable expenses and amounts. 
 
H.  VACATIONS AND TRAVEL 
 
Foster parents must notify the child’s worker about  travel plans when the child will be traveling for 
more than one day.  Foster parents may include a  foster child in the family vacation or provide 
permission for a child to travel with a group for edu cational and/or personal growth.  If the family will 
be traveling for an extended period of time withou t the child accompanying them, the foster parents are 
to inform the child’s worker of  alternate childcare arrangements. 
 
OCS must approve all out-of-state  travel of a foster child.  As much advance notice as possible, 
preferably at least one month, should be given so necessary parental, court and state office approval can 
be obtained.  Expenses for v acations cannot be reimbursed.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 68 	
 
 
I.  SOCIALIZATION AND DE
VELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES 
 
The maximum socialization and developmental fundi ng for children age six through 17 may vary based 
on availability of funding and may be spent for the child  to participate in formalized developmental or 
socialization activities.  It is not expected that such expenditures will be made on behalf of every child.  
The activity is to be purposefully planned to meet the child’s need in a specific area such as building 
self-confidence, physical coordination,  or improving peer interactions.  If such a need is identified, it is 
to be addressed in the child’s  case plan.  Allowable activities in clude summer camps, community 
organization/church/school sponsored trips, membersh ip in organizations such as Scouts or community 
sport teams and similar activities; se lf-improvement or skill classes in music, art, dance, gymnastics, or 
other physical development activities.   Funds may be used, if more appropriate, to purchase items 
needed to participate in developmental or socialization activities. 
 
The following kinds of items/activities are not allowed:  9 Items that cannot be physically moved with the child 
9  TV, VCR, Stereo, Electronic devices, Video games 
9  Birthday parties and gifts or 
9  Christmas gifts. 
 
As reimbursable expenses are limite d, activities should be selected through joint discussion with the 
child’s foster care worker, foster parent, and child (if age appropriate).  Activi ties should be selected 
based upon the ability to meet the child’s specific de velopmental needs.  Authorization from the child’s 
foster care worker shall be obtaine d prior to any purchases.  The identi fied needs of the child, selected 
activities and use of developmental  and socialization funds should be in cluded in the child’s case plan. 
 
J.  MISCELLANEOUS EXPENDITURES 
 
There are other items funded by the agency.  The fo llowing items may also be claimed as incidental 
expenses. 
 
Long distance telephone calls  made on behalf of the foster child in accordance with the child’s service 
plan – such as phone calls to arra nge appointments for the child and ca lls to the office to discuss the 
child.  The agency does not pay for unauthorized phone  calls made by the foster child on the foster 
parent’s phone. 
 
A suitcase  purchased by the foster care worker may be a pproved on an individual basis when the child’s 
need warrants the purchase.  A suitcase  cannot be claimed by a foster parent. 
 
Babysitting fees incurred when attending foster parent  training sessions required by the agency.  
Contact your worker for the rates established for  the reimbursement of babysitting fees.  A maximum 
amount is reimbursed per fiscal year (July 1	
st – June 30	th) for foster parent  in-service training.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 11. Reimbursement 
Section No./Name Reimbursement 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2008 
Replacing June 2007 	
 
 	
Page 69 	
 
 
 
Swimming pool alarms
 are a reimbursable item for those fost er parents who have swimming pools and 
want the additional security that a pool alarm may provide.  Foster parents will be reimbursed a 
maximum of *25.00** toward the purchase of a pool  alarm or up to *$25.00** toward the purchase of a 
pool cover, certified as a pool safety  device, not just a cover.  The expenses will be paid once a child has 
been placed in the foster home.   Examples of situations when a pool  alarm may be warranted include the 
placement of a child with developmental delays, an  overly active child, a small child, or any other child 
who may be unaware of pool safety rules.  For childre n who could be considered at higher risk, foster 
parents may also wish to provide swimming lessons  or water safety classes which would be funded 
socialization/developmental funds. 
 
Initial placement incidental purchases  for such items as shampoo, sanitary napkins, deodorant, 
shaving cream, toothbrush, etc. can be purchased fo r the child.  There is a maximum allowable amount 
for the purchase of these items.  Contact your child’s  worker for the allowable amount if you plan on 
seeking reimbursement of these purchases.  These e xpenses are only reimbursed at the child’s initial 
entry into foster care.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 12. Foster Parent Support Systems 
Section No./Name Foster Parent Support Systems 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 70 	
 
 
PART 12– FOSTER PARE
NT SUPPORT SYSTEMS 
 
A.  FOSTER PARENT ASSOCIATIONS  
 
Foster parents are encouraged to organize and/or partic ipate in a foster parent association in their parish 
or region.  Purposes of foster  parent associations include: 
 
• Improving and promoting services to foster children; 
•  Enhancing communication between the agency and  the community regarding the overall foster 
care program; 
•  Upgrading the image of foster pa rents and foster children; and 
•  Devising a means for problem solving and education  in areas related to caring for and advocating 
for foster children. 
 
Foster parent associations provide a means for foster parents to encourage and support each other in 
their foster parenting roles.    There are approximat ely 20 local associations, at least one in each region 
of Louisiana.  Refer to Appendix  G for the Louisiana Foster and Adopt ive Parent Association’s address 
and Appendix B for the National Fost er Parents Association Code of Ethics for Foster Parents.   
 
B.  FAMILY RESOURCE CENTERS 
 
Family Resource Centers are located within each regi on of Louisiana.  The centers provide services and 
support designed to meet the needs of foster and adoptiv e families in an effort to help increase a foster 
child’s level of stability and perman ency.  The services include:   
 
Crisis Respite  – Unplanned respite due to an emer gent or unanticipated situation; 
Planned Respite  – To give the caregiver a break or leisure  time and also provide the child with various 
activities including field trips, sc hool activities, camps, etc.  
Resource Library  – Information which is provided or made accessible to the family; 
Support Services—Services that support the parent such as  support groups, advocacy, information and 
referrals, etc.; and  
Training  – Information provided on a speci fic topic, which is not part of a parenting curriculum; 
includes such topics as stress mana gement, conflict resolution and fost er and adoptive parent in-service 
training. 
 
C.  LOUISIANA ADVOCACY SUPPORT TEAM 
 
The Louisiana Advocacy Support Team (L.A.S.T.) is  comprised of volunteer foster parents.  They 
receive ongoing training that enables  them to help other foster parents deal with allegations of abuse or 
neglect in the foster home.   
The goals of L.A.S.T. are: 
 
• Retain quality foster homes;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name 12. Foster Parent Support Systems 
Section No./Name Foster Parent Support Systems 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 71 	
 
 	
• 
Provide immediate moral and technical support to fo ster families at the threat of allegations or 
neglect; 
•  Provide information about th e investigation process; 
•  Advocate to improve Child Protectio n and Child Welfare policy; and  
•  Provide a training assessment tool  to give foster parents the training they need to parent 
defensively. 
 
The phone number for L.A.S.T. is listed in Appendix G.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix A. Bill of Rights for Foster Children 
Section No./Name Appendix A. Bill of Rights for Foster Children 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 72 	
 
 
APPENDIX A 
 
BILL OF RIGHTS FOR FOSTER CHILDREN  
Ratified in Congress Hall, Philadelphia 
 Saturday, the Twenty-eighth of  Apr il, Nineteen hundred and seventy three 
 
  EVEN more than for other children, society  has a responsibility along with parents for 
the well being of foster children.   Citizens are responsible for acting to insure their welfare. 
 
  EVERY  foster child is endowed w ith the rights inherently bel onging to all children.  In  
addition, because of the temporary or perman ent separation from and loss of parents and 
other family members, the foster child requir es special safe guards, resources, and care. 
 
EVERY FOSTER CHILD HAS THE INHERENT RIGHT: 
 
Article the first…  To be cherished by a family of his own, either his family helped by readily  available services and supports to rea ssume his care, or an adoptive family 
or by plan, a continuing foster family. 
Article the second…  To be nurtured by foster pa rents who have been selected to meet his 
individual needs, and who are provid ed services and supports, including 
specialized education, so that they can  grow in their ability to enable the 
child to reach his potential. 
Article the third…  To receive sensitive, co ntinuing help in understanding and accepting the 
reasons for his own family’s inabil ity to take care of him, and in 
developing confidence in his own self-worth. 
Article the fourth…  To receive continuing lovi ng care and respect as a unique human being…a 
child growing in trust in himself and others. 
Article the fifth…  To grow up in freedom  and dignity in a neighborhood of people who 
accept him with understanding, respect and friendship. 
Article the sixth…  To receive  help in overcoming deprivation or whatever distortion in his 
emotional, physical, intellectual, soci al and spiritual growth may have 
resulted from his early experiences. 
Article the seventh…  To receive education, trai ning and career guidance to prepare him for a 
useful and satisfying life. 
Article the eighth…  To receive preparation fo r citizenship and parenthood through interaction 
with foster parents and other adults who are consistent role models. 
Article the ninth…  To be represented by an atto rney at law in administrative or judicial 
proceedings with access to fair hearings  and court review of decisions, so 
that his best interest are safeguarded. 
Article the tenth…  To receive a high quality of  child welfare services, including involvement 
of the natural parents and his own involvement in major decisions that 
affect his life.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix B. National Foster Parent Association Code of Ethics 
Section No./Name Appendix B. National Foster Parent Association Code of Ethics 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 73 	
 
 
APPENDIX B
 
 
NATIONAL FOSTER PARENT ASSOCIATION   
CODE OF ETHICS   
Each foster parent has an obligation to maintain a nd improve the practices of fostering, constantly to 
examine, use, and increase the knowledge upon which fostering is based; and to perform the service of 
fostering with integrity and competence. 
 
Principles: 
 
1.  I regard as my primary obligati on the welfare of the child served. 
 
2.  I shall work objectively with  the agency in effecting the plan for the child in my care. 
 
3.  I hold myself responsible for the quality  and extent of the services I perform. 
 
4.  I accept the reluctance of the child to discuss his or her past. 
 
5.  I shall keep confidentia l from the community, information pe rtaining to any child placed in my 
home. 
 
6.  I treat with respect the findings, views and acti ons of fellow foster parents and use appropriate 
channels such as a foster parent  organization to express my opinions. 
 
7.  I shall take advantage of available opportuni ties for education and training designed to upgrade 
my performance as a foster parent. 
 
8.  I respect the worth of all individuals regardless  of race, religion, sex or national ancestry in my 
capacity as a foster parent. 
 
9.  I accept the responsibility to work toward assuri ng that ethical standards are adhered to by any 
individual or organization pr oviding foster care services. 
 
10.  I shall distinguish clearly in pub lic between my statements and actions as an individual and as a 
representative of a fost er parent organization. 
 
11.  I accept responsibility for working toward the cr eation and maintenance of conditions within the 
field of foster care that enab le foster parents to uphold th e principles of this code.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix C. Remember to Ask 
Section No./Name Appendix C. Remember to Ask 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 74 	
 
 
APPENDIX C
 
 
REMEMBER TO ASK 
 
The following questions will help you make a decisi on when a social worker contacts you regarding the 
placement of child in your home.  Please be aware  that under some circumstances the worker may not 
know some information at the time of placement. 
 
I.    General Information Regard A Child  1.  What is the child’s name?   Does he have a nickname? 
2.  How old is the child?   
3.  What is the general pers onality type of the child? 
4.  What is the child’s physical appearance? 
5.  Are there brothers and sisters?  Where are they? 
6.  What is the child’s re lationship to his family? 
7.  Can the child’s feelings about being  placed in foster care be determined? 
8.  Does the child have any  special behavior problems? 
9.  What are the child’s hobbies, sp ecial interests, and abilities? 
10. How does the child relate to other childr en?  Is the child use to other children? 
11. Can this child relate to th e opposite sex parental figure? 
12. Does this child relate to  the same sex parental figure? 
13. Has this child ever been placed in  any other foster home or care facility? 
14. What were the outcomes of  any previous placements? 
15. What, if any, religious requirements  are the biological parents requesting? 
16. Does the child have a pet? 
17. What is the child’s favorite food? 
 
II.  Information Regarding Placement 
  1.  Why is this child being placed (physical or sexual abuse or neglect)? 
  2.  Is this to be a voluntary plac ement or a court-ordered placement? 
  3.  Where is the child coming from? 
  4.  What is the expected length of placement? 
  5.  When could we expect the child? 
 
III.  Health of the Child 
  1.  What is the health  condition of the child? 
  2.  Does the child have any physical disabilities? 
  3.  Does the child need  therapy of any kind? 
  4.  Is there any special  equipment the child needs? 
  5.  When was the child’s last physical? 
  6.  Are the child’s immunizations current? 
  7.  Does the child require  medication or a special diet?

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix C. Remember to Ask 
Section No./Name Appendix C. Remember to Ask 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 75 	
 
 	
8.  Does the child have any allergies?  If so, what? 
  9.  Is the child seen by a phys ician on a regular basis?  
 
IV.  Information Regarding School 
  1.  What grade is the child in at present? 
  2.  What school was the child attending? 
  3.  Will the child be required  to continue at the same school? 
  4.  Is the child performing so cially at that grade level? 
  5.  Does the child have any learning diffi culties at school?  If so, what are they? 
  6.  What is the child’s intelligence level?

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix D. When to Call A Worker 
Section No./Name Appendix D. When to Call A Worker 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 76 	
 
 
APPENDIX D
 
 
WHEN TO CALL A WORKER  
You may contact the child’s social  worker at any time you need to give  or receive information or need 
support.  The following list provides examples of  times when you should contact the child’s worker:  
  9 Accident or Death or Medical Em ergency:  Notify the worker or supervisor as soon as possible; 
9  Runaway or Missing or Kidnapped:   Contact the worker or supervisor and the police department 
to report a missing child; 
9  Behavior Problems the child may be having in  your home, the school or community should be 
reported at their onset; 
9  Change in School or Church shoul d be discussed with the social worker prior to the changes; 
9  School Problems:  Contact the worker when proble ms are of a serious nature related to academic 
performance; 
9  Plans for a Family Vacation:  If it involves leavi ng the state, report to the worker at least one 
month prior to the planned trip;  
9  Plans for the family to be away from the foster  home for more than 24 hours: Contact the worker 
and advise worker of where and how you can be reached; 
9  If the child’s biological parent or extended rela tives attempts to take the child without prior 
agency approval:  Contact the worker immediately; and 
9  If you have a family emergency that will require your absence from the home for a period of 
time:  Contact the worker as soon as possible. 
 
These are a few examples of when to call the worker.   Keep in mind the child’s worker has other clients 
and has to be out of the office frequently.  Howeve r, you may contact the worker’s supervisor, if you 
cannot reach the worker.  If an af ter-hours emergency occurs, you may contact the worker or supervisor 
at home (their numbers are on the Form 98-A)  or contact the on-call worker through the Child 
Protection Hotline (discuss with the OCS worker the  local procedure for after hour contacts, as the 
procedure vary among parishes).

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 77 	
 
 
APPENDIX E
 
 
CHILDREN’S  DEVELOPMENTAL  MILESTONES 
 
During the first year the infant’s development is so  dramatic that parents often feel the baby “changes 
overnight.”  Physical development proceeds from h ead control to mobility.  The primary psychosocial 
task for the baby is to build a sense of safety, secu rity and trust in other human beings (parents/other 
caretakers).  If this task is not accomplished,  it will impact on related emotional development. 
 
Infancy to Six  Months 
Physical:   Sucks reflexively; visually tracks to midline; lifts head when held upright; rolls from stomach 
to back; pulls to sit without head lag; grasps rattle;  reaches for objects; inspects objects with hands, eyes 
and mouth; 
Cognitive/Language:   Smiles selectively at mother’s voice; startle reflex to sudde n noise; babbles and 
coos, squeals and gurgles (by three months);  anticipates food with vocalization; laughs; 
Psychosocial:  Gazes at faces (birth); smiles responsively;  uses vocalization to interact socially; 
distinguishes primary caretakers from others and will react if removed from home; smiles readily at 
most people; plays alone.  
 
Six to Twelve  Months 
Physical:   Creeps; sits without support; pu lls to stand to cruise furniture; transfers objects hand to hand; 
bangs with spoon; finger feeds part  of meal; shakes bell; crawls on all fours; attains sitting position 
unaided; stands momentarily; first  steps; hold, bites and chews a cracker ; grasps string with thumb and 
forefinger; beats two spoons together; begins to use inde x finger to point and poke; 
Cognitive/Language:   smiles and vocalizes own mirror images; says “ma-ma”, “da-da”; shakes head to 
say “no-no”; imitates playful sounds; responds to  name with head turn, eye contact and smile; 
recognizes voices of favorite people; responds to  verbal request such as wave bye-bye; repeats 
performance that are laughed at;  
Psychosocial:   Discriminates strangers- i.e., frowns, st ares, cries; first stranger/separation anxiety 
begins; actively seeks adult  attention; wants to be picked up and held; plays peek-a-boo; rarely lies down 
except to sleep; pats own mirror image; chews an d bites on toys; beginning responsiveness to own 
name; social with family; becomi ng aware of emotions of others. 
 
During the toddler years, ch ildren tend to separate emotionally from  parents or primary caretakers.  Self-
esteem and self-confidence develops as they make  moves towards greater autonomy while securing their 
attachment to important adults.  Key milestone s include locomotion, toilet training and verbal 
communication. 
 
12 to 18 Months  
Physical:   Walks alone; stoops and stands  up again; climbs up on furniture; walks up stairs with help; 
builds tower of two cubes; scribbles spontaneously or by imitation; holds cup;  put raisin or pellet in 
bottle; turns book pages, 2-3 at a tim e; removes hat, shoes and socks; inhibits drooling; chews most

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 78 	
 
 
foods well; opens closed doors; holds cup and drinks with some spilling; imita
tes housework; will bring 
familiar object upon request; 
 
Cognitive/Language:  Jabbers expressively; communicates by ge sture; vocalizes more than cries for 
attention; understands word; shakes head to indicat e NO; says 2-3 “words” other than ma-ma or da-da; 
looks in appropriate place when asked, i.e., “Where is book?”; vocalizes NO; vocabulary of 10-15 
words; fluent use of jargon; point s and vocalizes to indicate wants; 
 
Psychosocial:   Strong dependence on primary caretaker with  increasing difficulty separating; difficulty 
quieting and relaxing into sleep; wants to have care taker nearby all the time; gives toy to adult on 
request; shows sense of me mine; follows simple  request; begins to distinguish you and me; imitates 
adult activities; interested in strangers, but wary;  sharp discipline not helpful; verbal persuasion and 
scolding not useful; plays alone or beside  other children; strong claiming of mine. 
 
18 to 24 Months  
Physical:   Runs stiffly; pushes and pulls large object s; comes down stairs on bottom or abdomen; seats 
self in small chair; builds tower of  4-7 cubes; tries to fold paper imitatively; can wiggle thumb; turn 
knobs (television); help dre ss and undress self; may indicate wet or soiled diapers; pulls person to show; 
asks for food and drink by vocalizing and gesture; uses  spoon with little spilling; replaces some objects 
where they belong; 
Cognitive/Language:  Points to pictures in books; points to  one body part on request; vocabulary of 20 
words-mostly nouns; understands yours vs. mine; enjoys  simple stories; speaks in two word sentences – 
i.e., “juice gone”;  
Psychosocial:   Moves about house without  constant supervision; temper tantrums are common in 
situations of frustration; begins  to call self by name; discrimina tes between edible and non-edible 
substances; claims and defends ownership of own things. 
 
24 to 30 Months 
Physical:   Jumps in place; can walk on tiptoe (imita tion); walks up and down steps, both feet on each 
step; can walk backwards; runs headlong; holds pe ncil with thumb and forefingers; can zip and unzip; 
builds tower of 6-8 cubes; learning to use buttons and buckles; pulls on socks, pants or shorts; drinks 
from cup without spilling; helps put thi ngs away; toilet training in progress; 
Cognitive/Language:   Often calls self by first name; speaks  50 or more words; has vocabulary of 300 
words; uses phrases and 3-4 word  sentences; understands and asks for “another”; points to four body 
parts; 
Psychosocial:  Initiates own play activities; wants routine “just so”; does not like change in routine; 
cannot wait or delay gratification;  does not share; identity in terms of sex and place in family is well 
established; observes other  children at play and joins in for a few minutes. 
 
30 to 36 Months 
Physical:   Completes three piece form-board; turn pages  singly; can dress with supervision; eats with 
fork and spoon; pours from one container to another;  gets drink unassisted; avoid simple hazards;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 79 	
 
 
Cognitive/Language:
 Verbalizes toilet needs;  uses plural; increasing use of verbs; beginning use of 
adjectives and prepositions; vo cabulary of 900-1000 words by 36 months; uses verbal commands; gives 
full name when asked; asks “What’s that?” 
Psychosocial:   Begins associative play activ ities; names or points to self in photos; joins in nursery 
rhymes and songs; likes praise; auditory fears are prominent (noises)  show sympathy, pity, modesty and 
shame. 
 
During pre-school years, a ch ild attain proficiency in simple self-care within the home and begins to 
form important relationships with peers and adults in  nursery school or day care setting.  This is a period 
of continuing growth in individua tion and independence.  Identification  and attachment to the family is 
strong.  Loss of or separation from  parent during this phase of development may have long-term impact 
on personal identity or the pe rsistence of magical thinking. 
 
Three Years 
Physical:   Gallops; balances on one foot (1-5 seconds);  catches large ball, arms flexed; hops on one 
foot; turns somersaults; copies ci rcles; builds with legos, etc.; spont aneously draws; imitates snipping 
with scissors; 
Cognitive/Language:   Follows two unrelated commands; iden tifies same/different with pictures; 
responds to verbal limits and direc tions; identifies 2 or 3 colors; listens attentively to short story; 
converses in sentences; speech is completely intell igible; answers simple yes/no questions; tells age by 
holding up fingers; shows understanding of pa st versus present; matches colors;  
Psychosocial:   Outstanding characteristic is readiness to conform to spoken word; begins to take turns; 
plays simple group games; tries to please; may ma sturbate openly; may have imaginary playmates; 
shares upon request. 
 
Four Years 
Physical:   Runs smoothly, varying speeds; bounces ball  with beginning control; throws ball overhand; 
walks up and down stairs with alternating feet using ra il; attempts to cut on straight line; writes on page 
at random; may try to print own name; draws person-arms and legs may come directly from head; 
Cognitive/Language:   Understands opposite analogies; follow  3-stage commands; listens eagerly to 
stories; uses all parents of speech correctly; uses  color names; defines words in terms of use (car, 
pencil); ask many why, what and how  questions; enjoys humor and self laughing; enjoys dress-up play, 
categorizes animals, food, toys; 
Psychosocial:   Urge to conform/please is diminished; control issues prominent for many children; may 
be physically aggressive; nightmares prominent; may argue, boast and make alibis; tendency to boss and 
criticize others; separates from mo ther easily; prefers peers to adults; washes face, brushes teeth and 
dresses self; uses  bathroom unassisted. 
 
Five Years 
Physical:   Uses roller skates; rides bicycle with training  wheels; colors within lines; can cut on line; ties 
knots in string after demonstration; 
Cognitive/Language:   Listens briefly to what others say; rep eats days of week; acts out stories; ready to 
enter kindergarten; states address,  age, name and ages of siblings; learns left from right; match 10-12

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 80 	
 
 
colors; predicts what will happen ne
xt; prints first name and simple words; writing is mostly capitals-
immature appearance; frequently copies left to righ t; recognizes first name and several or all numerals 
on clock, phone, calendar; adds and s ubtracts using five fingers; is capable of self criticism and self-
praise; 
Psychosocial:   Enjoys small group; knows when certain events occur; accepts adult help and 
supervision; likes to complete task; enjoys competi tive exercise games; fears of parental loss, thunder 
and scary animals; more conscious of body, wants privacy; less hitt ing, more verbalizing. 
 
During the elementary school years, they experience  successful mastery of the world outside their own 
family unit.  Children this age are involved in academ ic learning, social interactions with same-sex peers 
and developing motor skills.  As they move into the la tency years, there is a strong need for children to 
learn more about their early hist ory and incorporate this knowledge  in their growing sense of self-
identify. 
 
Six Years 
Physical:   Constant motion-very active; balances and  rhythm are good; ties own shoes; makes simple, 
recognizable drawings;  
Cognitive/Language:   Uses picture dictionary; identifies lik eness/difference between objects; can tell 
what number comes after 8; understands quantity up to 10; identifies words by length or beginning 
sound/letters; rereads bo oks many times; prints first and last name ; reverses digits when writing teens 
(13/31); names coins, states, cents value of a penny, di me and nickel; writing is slow and effortful with 
mixed capital and lower case letters; 
 
Psychosocial:   Poor ability to modulate feelings; enj oys performing for others; difficulty making 
decisions; plays simple table games; often insists on having own way; may return to thumb sucking, 
baby talk, etc.; often takes small things from others a nd claims them as found; begins to distinguish right 
and left on self; understands time interval differences including seasons. 
 
Seven Years 
Physical:   Small muscles are well developed; eye-hand coor dination is well developed; draws triangle in 
good proportion; copies vertical  and horizontal diamonds;  
Cognitive/Language:  Speaks fluently; uses slang and clichés; re cites days of week and months of year; 
can talk about own feelings in retr ospect; often seems not to hear wh en absorbed in own activity; can 
organize and classify inform ation; writing speed increases; learns to tell time; 
Psychosocial:  Independent in completion of routines; learning to screen out distractions and focus on 
one task at a time; when angry becomes quiet and su llen; better control of voice and temper; sets high 
expectations for self; frequently  disappointed by own performance; anxious to please others; sensitive to 
praise and blame; has not learned to lose games, will cheat or end game abruptly; concerned about right 
and wrong. 
 
Eight Years 
Physical:  Movement is rhythmical and somewhat gr aceful; frequent accidents due to misjudging 
abilities; holds pencil, toot hbrush and tools less tensely; enjoys exercise of both large and small muscles;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 81 	
 
 
Cognitive/Language:
 Ease in expression and communication; lik es humor in stories; omits words and 
reads out of order; interested in  money; knows addition and subtraction combinations – some by heart; 
can write sentences; begins cursive writing; few reversal errors; tries to write neatly; 
Psychosocial:   May be selfish and demanding  of attention; may be cheerful; very curious about activity 
of others; learning to lose at game s; begins to have sense of humor, e.g., original riddles and jokes. 
 
Nine Years 
Physical:   Becomes interested in competitive sports-soc ial aspects of the games are primary; apt to 
overdo physical activities;  sitting posture often awkward-slouches , head close to work, etc.; works 
purposefully to improve physical skills; 
Cognitive/Language:  Enjoys school; wants to operate at opti mal level; can describe preferred methods 
of learning; enjoys keepi ng a diary and making lists; prefers to r ead silently; worries about doing well in 
school; 
Psychosocial:  Appears emotionally more stable; capable of  concentrating for several hours; likes to plan 
ahead; peer pressure gains importance; may take up collecting hobbies; makes decision easily. 
 
Ten Years 
Physical:   Girls and boys tend to be even in size and se xual maturity at tenth birthday; girls’ bodies 
undergo slight softening and roundi ng; increased fidgeting more common for girls than boys; little 
awareness of fatigue; bathing is strongly refused; loves outdoor exercise play – e.g., baseball, skating, 
jump rope, running; 
Cognitive/Language:  Can participate in discussion of social  and world problems; interest in reading 
varies from child to child; wishes are mostly for ma terial possessions, health and happiness for self and 
others and personal improvement; enjoys memorizing;  prefers oral to written work in school; interest 
span is short, needs frequent shift in activity in  school; interest in movies and television diminishes; 
Psychosocial:   Seems relaxed and casual; boys show frie ndship with physical expression (wrestle, 
shove, punch); girls show friendship with note writing, gossip and hand-holding;  enjoys sharing secrets 
and discussing mysteries with frie nds; believes friends over parents;  anger not frequent and is soon 
resolved; little crying except with hu rt feelings; does not respond well when praised or reprimanded in 
front of friends.   
 
The tasks of adolescence are similar for both boys  and girls although boys tend to lag behind girls by 
one to two years, especially in physical maturation.  Asymmetrical development, e.g., cognitive 
development before physical growth, is common.  The  primary tasks are:   exploring personal identity 
and roles; lessening dependence on family and  renewed emphasis on separation and individuation; 
exploring relationships with peers;  exploring sexuality; and exploring wa ys to feel competent, important 
and accomplished.  Normal development often involve s swings in mood and reliability, vacillation 
dependence and independence, self-absorption, im pulsivity and control conflicts with adults. 
 
11-13 Years  
Physical:   (Girls) – Public hair pigmented, curl; auxiliary hair begins  after pubic hair; height growth 
spurt; breast development continues; labia enla rged; increase in subcutaneous fat; menarche

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 82 	
 
 
(menstruation begins);  (Boys) – Prepubescent physical development; beginning growth of testes, 
scrotum and penis; downy pubic ha
ir; consistent height growth; 
Cognitive/Language:  Beginning to move from concrete toward  abstract thinking; increased interest in 
ideas, values, social issues, music, clothes, hair, personal appearance (especially common for girls); 
although conflict with family increases, most expre ss attitudes that place strong value on family and 
involved parents; 
Psychosocial:  Anxious about peer acceptance;  concern with self-identity; girls – highly concerned with 
body image and physical changes; increased interest  in peers and culture; changing friends is common; 
strong need for achievement and recognition of  accomplishment although may be masked by feigned 
indifference. 
 
13-15 Years 
Physical:   (Girls) – Pubic hair fully de veloped; continued breast growth ; menstruation well established; 
decelerating height growth; ovulation  (fertility); moderate muscle growth and increase in motor skills; 
(Boys) – Public hair pigmented, curled; penis, test es and scrotum continues to grow; height growth 
spurt; seminal emissions but  sterile; voice lowers as larynx enlarges; mustache hair; 
Cognitive/Language:  When intelligence is normal, abstract  thought is fully developed (usually by age 
15) and an be applied in more situations; anxiety,  major distractions interfere with abstract thinking; 
continued interest in ideas,  values and social issues; 
Psychosocial:  Increased independence from family; girls  are somewhat more comfortable with body 
image and changes; boys highly concerned with body a nd changes as puberty begins; relationships with 
opposite sex increase; same sex relationship continues  to dominate; reliance on and anxiety about peer 
relationships continue; may experiment with drugs; concerned with achievement, experiences, feelings 
of accomplishment and receiving recognition; con tinued interest in appearance, music and other 
elements of peer culture. 
 
15-16 Years  
Physical:   (Girls) – Full development of  breasts and auxiliary hair; dece lerated height growth;  (Boys) – 
Facial and body hair; pubic and auxi liary hair denser; voice deepens; testes, penis and scrotum continue 
to grow; emissions of motile spermatozoa (fertility);  graduated deceleration of height growth; muscle 
growth; 
Cognitive/Language:  When intelligence is normal, abstract thi nking is well established; applications to 
own current and future situations  and to broader issues (e.g., social concerns and academic studies); 
Psychosocial:  As a major emancipation step becomes imminent, there may be marked increase in 
anxiety and avoidance behaviors;  increasingly concerned and interested in movement towards 
independence; can maintain more stable relationshi p with peers and adults; body image reasonably well 
established especially among girls; mo re realistic and stable view of self and others, nature of problems 
and better at problem solving. 
 
17-21 Years  
Physical:   (Girls) – Uterus develops fully by age 18-21;  other physical maturation complete;  (Boys) – 
Full development of primary and secondary sex char acteristics; muscle and hair development may 
continue;

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 
Section No./Name Appendix E. Children’s Developmental Milestones 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 83 	
 
 
Cognitive/Language:
 Ability for abstract thinking and  for practical problem-solving skills is 
increasingly tested by the demands associated  with emancipation and/or higher education; 
Psychosocial:  Partial or full emancipation is accomplishe d, although with difficulty; concerns about 
autonomy lessen and concerns about resources (money,  car) increase; relationships with family tend to 
be somewhat less conflictual; exis ting conflict tend to revolve around emancipation is sues; attention still 
on peers and self-identity. 
 
 
 
Reprinted from:  Helping in Child Protective Services:  A Casework Handbook.  American Association 
for Protecting Children, a division of the American  Humane Association.  1991. Revised Edition. Per 
information from the CPI Decision Making Handbook - Appendix B.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix F. Immunization Schedule 
Section No./Name Appendix F. Immunization Schedule 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 84 	
 
 
APPENDIX F
 
 
Recommended Childhood and Adol escent Immunization Schedule 
Department of Health and Human Services 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
United States 2005 
 
 
      Age 
 
Vaccine  Birth 
1 M 2 M  4 M 6 M  12 M  15 M  18 M 24 M 4-6 
Years  11-12 
Years 13-18 
Years 
Hepatitis B 
(HepB)  HepB 
#1 HepB #2 
Recommended  HepB #3 
Recommended    
  
Diphtheria, 
Tetanus, 
Pertussis 
(DTaP)    
DTaP  DTaP 
Recommended   DTaP 
Td Td 
Haemophilus 
Influenzae 
type b 
(Hib)   
 Hib Hib Hib  Hib 
Recommended    
   
Inactivated 
Polio Virus 
(IPV)    
IPV IPV  IPV 
Recommended   IPV 
  
Measles, 
Mumps, 
Rubella 
(MMR)   
     MMR #1 
Recommended    
MMR 
#2    
Varicella 
      Varicella 
Recommended    
  
Pneumococcal 
(PCV)   
 PCV PCV PCV  PCV 
Recommended   PCV 
Recommended 
Influenza     Influenza (Yearly) Reco mmended Influenza (Yearly) Recommended 
Hepatitis A             Hepatitis A Series Recommended 
       for selected populations

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix G. Information Assistance 
Section No./Name Appendix G. Information Assistance 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  July 2005 
Replacing November 1998 	
 
 	
Page 85 	
 
 
APPENDIX G
 
 
 
Louisiana Advocacy Support Team (L.A.S.T.) 
Toll Free Number:  1-888-655-9564 
 
Louisiana Foster and Adop tive Parent Association 
P.O. Box 332 
Baton Rouge, LA  70821 
 
Louisiana Drug and Poison Information 
Toll Free Number:  1-800-256-9822

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix H. Forms 
Section No./Name Appendix H. Forms 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  April 2009 
Replacing August 2007 	
 
 	
Page 86 	
 
 
APPENDIX H
 
 
FORMS 
 
  Authorization for Emergency  Services (OCS Form 98-A) 
  Agreement for Foster Family Services (OCS Form 427) 
 Caretaker’s Supplementary Expendi ture Affidavit (OCS Form 435) 
  Child Specific In-Service Training Credit 
  DD-1 Direct Deposit 
  Foster/Adoptive Home Evaluation for Envi ronmental, Health and Fire Safety 
(OCS Form HDU 5) 
 Foster/Adoptive Parent Recertification  Questionnaire (OCS Form HDU 604-II) 
 Workshop/Conference A ttendance Form (TRN-7)

Page 1of 2 	 OCS 98-A 
 	
Reissued: January 2009 
Replacing:  December 2004 	
OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES  CHILD PLACEMENT AGREEMENT 
  
Child’s Name: ___________________   TIPS#:                                    	
    DOB: _______________ 	
   	
AUTHORIZATION FOR EMERGENCY SERVICES 	
 
This is to certify that                                                                                       	
 is/are foster parent(s)/caregiver(s) for 
    	(Foster Parents’/Caregiver’s Name) 	 
              _
                                   __________                        	, who is in State custody, and is/are authorized to obtain 
           	 (Foster Child's Name)	 
emergency medical care on the child’s behalf. 	
 
WORKER/SUPERVISOR CONTACT 
 
                                                                   	
     (Work)                                     	      (Home) ___________________   
            	(Worker's Name)                                                                             (Phone No.)                                               (Phone No.) 	
      
                                                                   	
     (Work)                                    	    (Home) ___________________                                   	(Supervisor's Name)                                                                                   (Phone No.)           (Phone No.)                                
 
OCS Office for Worker & Supervisor responsible for case: _________________________________________      
           
OCS Office for Court of Jurisdiction: __________________________________________________________ 
 
CHILD SPECIFIC INFORMATION 
(The following three blank spaces do not need to be completed if  a copy of the child’s 98-B, listing the current physician and 
dentist and school, is provided to the foster parent/caretaker at the time of placement.)   
             
Child's Current Doctor ____________________________   ________________________________________                                               
             (Name)              (Address)  
Child's Current Dentist ____________________________   ________________________________________                                             
    	
     (Name)              (Address) 	 
Child's Current School ____________________________   ________________________________________                                               
         (Name)          (Address) 
 	
CHILD CARE REQUIREMENTS 	
Foster Parent/Caregiver agrees to comply with all State and Regulatory requirements that apply to this program.  This 
includes licensing regulations and any other OCS agreement to whic h Foster Parent/Caregiver is a party.  I agree to not use 
the following punishments or permit their use by others with the child: cruel, severe, or humiliating action; corporal 
punishment (i.e. physical punishment inflicted in any manner upon the body); denial of food, shelter, clothing, 
implementation of the case plan, or other basic services.   I agree to notify law enforcement and the child’s worker 
immediately if the child is  missing or has run away. 
 	
CHILD’S INITIAL SCREENING AND SPECIAL CARE PROVISIONS 	
Describe the known needs and behaviors of the child and the required services to meet those needs/behaviors, including those 
which are recent in development and/or have not been addressed in the child’s current OCS Case Plan.  Provide any known 
educational or health problems, including infectious dis eases (e.g. TB, STD’s, hepatitis, etc.), needs (e.g. known 
conditions/allergies, medications, pending appointments, etc.)  and childcare information, (e.g. food preferences, formula, 
bedtime, etc.) for the Foster Parent/Careg iver.  List any behaviors of the child that require special attention (i.e., running 
away, self injurious behavior, criminal activities, sexually ac ting out, involvement with Office of Juvenile Justice (OJJ) or t he 
police or FINS, etc.), explain an y history of child’s substance use/addiction and/ or prenatal exposure to alcohol/drugs. List 
the information/special provisions:  __________________________________________________________________                     
________________________________________________________________________\
______________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________________________________________ 
Identify and describe for foster parent/caregiver risk factor s based on the child’s history and vulnerability, which will requi re 
specific supervision/actions/equipment to provide care and prevent maltreatment.  
___________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Page 2 of 2 	
 OCS 98-A 
 	
Reissued: January 2009 
Replacing:  December 2004 	
 
Describe history of physical or sexual abuse/neglect of child including information regarding extent of abuse, e.g. child 
violently shaken, or child fondled by maternal/paternal relative, etc.  ____________________________________________   
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
Describe any known specialized training requirements for the fo ster parent, which are necessary to meet the medical and/or 
behavioral needs of the child.  __________________________________________________________________________ 
___________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
___________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
The above information was provided by ______________________________________ on  _______________________  Name / Relationship                                                     Date 
 	
CHILD VISITATION RESOURCES 	
The child should be assisted and encouraged to maintain cont act and/or visit with the following individuals as indicated 
below.  Provide a copy of the child’s case  plan including the visitation plan, if available.  If the case plan has not been 
completed yet provide a copy when the form is completed at the first FTC	
. 	
 	Name Relationship  Method
 (phone, 
In person, mail, 
etc.) Frequency	
 	
Information needed for contact (phone number, mailing address, email 
address, geographic address fo r location of visit, etc.) 	
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
    
 
This agreement provides a basic commitment between the parties.	 
 	
I certify by my signature below that the OCS worker and I  have discussed the child-care responsibilities and authorization 
for emergency services information presented on this form.  I  certify that I agree to fulfill these expectations.  I understand  
that failure or inability to fulfill these responsibilities may require corrective action. 
 
Foster parents/caregiver must check the  statement below, which applies to the child’s health and education information. 
     	
 Yes, I received a copy of the child’s health and educa tion record, including a current IEP, if applicable.   
    
     
  No, Copies were not available, but worker discussed kno wn health and education information and advised copies  
       would be provided on or before the next FTC. 
 
     
  No, Copies were not made available and no health and education information was discussed. 	 
 	
Foster parents/caregiver must ch eck the statement below, which applies to Kid-Med Services.    
     	
 Yes, Kid-Med services and availability have been discussed with me.	 
 	
     
 	 No, Kid-Med services and availability were not discussed with me. 
          
 
 	
                                                                      (Date)	 	  (Foster Mother or Caretaker Signature)             
 
 
   (Foster Father Signature)                      (Date)	 
 
     
To the extent available and accessible, I have reviewed and shared all health, education and behavioral information 
pertinent for the care of this child. 	
 
 
    (Worker's Signature)                                                                                         (Date)

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: July 2006  Page 1 of 13 	
AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE  
STATE OF LOUISIANA 
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES 
OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES (OCS)  AND  
___________________________________ 	
(PARENT(S) 	
 
__________________________________ 	
(PROVIDER AGENCY, IF APPLICABLE) 	
FOR 
FOSTER HOME CARE FOR CHILDREN   
BRIEF SUMMARY OF SERVICES	
 
 
Foster Parents are essential members of the foster  care team, which includes the agency, the child and 
the biological parents, which works together for the be st interest of the child.  As such, foster parents 
are expected to maintain their home in accordan ce with licensing standards and to fulfill certain 
professional responsibilities to the  agency including responsibilities for the care and development of 
any child placed in the home.  The permanent plan  developed in the Family Team Conference is the 
primary plan for the child.  Permanency planning  involves all members of the foster care team; 
however, OCS has the final decision maki ng authority for children in OCS custody. 
 
PROVISIONS	
 
 
This agreement is to create a partnership for the pr ovision of foster care services to children in OCS 
custody and their families.  During  the performance of this agreement, the foster parent(s) and OCS 
agree to the following terms and conditions. 
 
RELATIONSHIP WITH THE AGENCY	
 
 
I understand certification and rece rtification to care for children in my home is dependent upon 
maintaining conditions approved during the process of  certification.  I also understand any change of 
locations or conditions will necessitate an assessme nt of my approval.  I, therefore, agree to 
immediately notify the assigned OCS worker of any changes which will affect the living arrangements 
of children placed in my home. 
I agree to:  • Fully participate in the home study for recertification and shall provide all  required or requested 
information needed by the agency to verify that  I continue to meet the minimum certification 
requirements;

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: July 2006  Page 2 of 13 	
• Allow OCS staff access to any member of my h ousehold and into all rooms within my home 
during the  recertification home study,  and at other times when it is necessary in the process of 
working with a child in the custody of OCS; 
•  Be responsible for providing or arranging trans portation for the child(ren) to and from all 
medical or dental appointments, counseling sess ions, recreational activities, school functions, 
and family visitations, as agreed to in the case plan; 
•  Receive payment for the care of the child(ren) onl y through the agency, or with the approval of 
the agency; 
•  Notify and request exception by the agency prior to  allowing any person to establish residence 
in my home; 
•  Not apply to any other agency for foster home ce rtification as long as I am certified through the 
OCS or through another certifying agency; 
•  Not accept a child(ren) for adoption from anothe r agency prior to the finalization of the 
adoption of an OCS child(ren); 
•  Not to foster or adopt a child  placed by another agency without  written permission from OCS; 
and 
•  Not to use my home as lodging for roomers, day  care or other such business to be conducted in 
my home. 
 
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT	
 
I agree: 
• As an applicant, to complete the pre-servi ce training approved by the agency as one of the 
requirements for certification; and 
•  As a foster parent with or without a foster child (ren) in my home or an adoptive parent with a 
child placed in my home in an  adoption that has not yet been finalized, to complete a minimum 
of 15 hours of agency approved in -service training annually.  I understand that in two parent 
households the hours may be shared by the parents but  that each adult must receive at least five 
hours and the total number of hours received must  be 15.  If I am designated by OCS as a child 
specific home, I agree to participate in annual  training requirements specified in the child’s 
OCS case plan. 
 
PLANNING WITH THE AGENCY
 
I agree, for each child placed in my home, to: 
• Participate and cooperate in the prepar ation, pre-placement and visiting plans; 
•  Work with the agency as a member of the treat ment team responsible for planning, providing, 
monitoring and evaluati ng the total care and services provided; 
•  Work with the child(ren)’s OCS worker(s) to develop and carry out the OCS case plan and 
participate in the Family Team Conference; 
•  Treat any personal information about a child or th e child’s family in a confidential manner; and 
not to share any personal inform ation with relatives, news reporters, television (media) or any 
other organization or person that is not an affiliate of OCS. 
•  Advise the agency of my family’s (inclusive  of any foster child in my home) emergency 
(evacuation) plan during a catastroph ic and/or crisis situation; and

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: July 2006  Page 3 of 13 	
• Assure that my family, inclus ive of foster children placed in my home, will evacuate when 
Parish officials have declared a mandatory evac uation; as well as, assure the continued safety 
of the children in my care. 
•  Notify the agency as soon as possible after the occurrence of any of the following: 
a.  A serious injury or illness involvi ng medical treatment of the child; 
b.  The death of the child; 
c.   Unauthorized absence of the child from  my home (i.e. a child has run away, been 
kidnapped, is lost or otherwise mi ssing and at risk of harm); or 
d.  Removal of the child from my home by any pe rson or agency other than OCS, or the 
attempt of such removal. 
•  Notify the agency as soon as possible but no late r than 12 hours after the occurrence of any of 
the following:  a.  Fire or other emergency requiring evacuation of the home; 
b.  Serious altercation  involving the child; 
c.   Involvement of the child with the au thorities (i.e. school, legal, etc.); 
d.  Other unusual circumstance involving the child or my family that affects the child or 
my role as a foster or adoptive parent. 
•  Obtain permission from the child’s OCS worker a nd/or the court of jurisdiction prior to out of 
state travel with the ch ild for a period of twenty-four hours or more; 
•  Notify the agency, in advance when possible, of changes in my family experiences, which 
affect the life and circumstances of the family.   (For example, serious changes in health, change 
of address or phone, financial condition, marriag e, divorce, separation, death, legal problems, 
etc.); 
•  Sign the child specific placement agreement with the agency; 
•  Communicate effectively with other members of  the foster care team and community resource 
staff (or providers) in order to meet the child’s ed ucational, medical, and mental health needs.  I 
also agree to interpret the foster parent role s positively to my extended family and community; 
•  Not allow the child to live with another person, except when so authorized in writing by the 
agency; and 
•  Give the child an appropriate chance to adjust  to my home before requesting his removal.  In 
the event the child’s  removal is requested, I agree to give  the agency ten days or as long as 
practical to allow the agency to  make a planned move for the child. 
 
WORKING WITH THE CHILD’S FAMILY	
 
I agree to: 
• Show respect for the child’s own family and to work with the child’s family members as 
written in the child’s OCS case plan; 
•  Participate in planning visits for the child and  his/her parents and family members as indicated 
in the child’s OCS case plan.  S hould contacts occur other than those written in the child’s OCS 
case plan, I will inform the foster care worker within seven days; and 
•  Allow the child and his family members to comm unicate by mail and by telephone as written in 
the child’s OCS case plan and the Ch ild Specific Placement Agreement.

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: July 2006  Page 4 of 13 	
MAINTAINING CHILDREN’S RECORDS	 
 
I agree to maintain a written and  pictorial record (a Life Book) on each child placed in my home in 
accordance with the directions  given to me by the agency. 
 
I understand the Life Book is the pr operty of the child and will follow the child when the child leaves 
my home. 
 
DAILY LIVING WITH THE CHILD	
 
I agree to: 
• Provide reasonable structure and daily activitie s designed to promote the individual, social, 
intellectual, spiritual and emotional devel opment of the child placed in my home; 
•  Encourage the child to develop skills and to perform tasks which will help the child become 
independent and learn to care for himself/herself; 
•  Cooperate with the agency to help  the child maintain an awareness of his past, a record of the 
present, and a plan for the future; 
•  Use only an approved child care plan.  A babysitter  must be at least 15 years of age.  If the 
child is left overnight, the babysitter must  be at least 21 years old.  Any babysitting 
arrangements longer than 24 hours in duration must  have the approval of the OCS worker.  No 
child in foster care shall be left  overnight without adult supervision; 
•  Ask a child placed in my home to do only work (t asks/chores) that are reasonable for his/her 
age and ability and are equal to those expected of my own children; 
•  Make every effort to teach good habits of  money management, budgeting and shopping, as 
appropriate to the child’s age an d abilities; as well as teach good  habits of personal hygiene and 
grooming appropriate to the chil d’s sex, age and culture, through careful daily monitoring; and 
•  Give to the child on a weekly, biweekly or m onthly basis the child’s allowance, which is 
included in monthly foster care boa rd rate, provided to me by the agency.  These funds will be 
given to the child to use at his  own discretion as written in the  child’s individual treatment plan 
and his developmental level. 
 
FOOD AND NUTRITION	
 
I agree to provide: 
• At least three nutritionally balanced meals and two snacks daily; 
•  For special dietary needs of the child placed in  my home as directed by a licensed physician or 
as written in the child’s OCS case plan; and 
•  Food that meets the diet requirements of  the child’s religion, if applicable. 
 
CLOTHING AND PERSONAL BELONGINGS	
 
I agree to: 
• Spend the money in the clothing allowance on  clothes for each foster child.  The clothing 
allowance is included in the fo ster care monthly board rate; 
•  Provide each child in my home  with his own clean, well fitting,  attractive, seasonal clothing 
appropriate to the age, sex and individual  needs of the child.  The clothing is to

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: July 2006  Page 5 of 13 	
• be like the clothes of other household members a nd meet the community standards.  Should the 
monthly allowance not be spent for that month,  the funds shall be saved to meet the child’s 
needs for seasonal clothing (winter coats,  winter clothing, summer clothing, etc.); 
•  Include the child in the choosing of hi s/her own clothing whenever possible; 
•  Allow the child to bring, posse ss and acquire personal belongings subject  only to reasonable 
household rules; and  
•  Provide each child with clean towels, washcl oths, his/her own toothbrush, his/her own comb 
and brush, and other toiletry items as  needed for the child’s age and sex. 
I understand that: 
• A child’s clothing shall be his ow n, not shared with others; and 
•  A child’s clothing and personal be longings shall go with the child at the time he leaves my 
home; and 
•  Only shoes in good repair or condition shall be provided for the child. \
 
DISCIPLINE AND CONTROL	
 
I agree to: 
• Train and discipline each child placed in my  home with methods that stress praise and 
encouragement for good behaviors rather than  punishment for bad behaviors; these methods 
build the child’s positive se lf-esteem and self-concept; 
•  Set well defined rules which have expectations a nd limits of behavior appropriate to the child’s 
age and level of understanding and to  discuss the rules with the child; 
•  Not to subject the child to verbal abuse or  derogatory remarks about himself and family 
members; and 
•  Not threaten the child with ha ving him removed from my home. 
 
PUNISHMENT	
 
I agree to: 
• Not use the following punishments or perm it their use by others with the child: 
a.   Cruel, severe or humiliating action; 
b.  Corporal punishment (i.e. physical punish ment inflicted in any manner upon the body); 
c.   Mechanical restraints; 
d.  Denial of food, shelter, clothing, implemen tation of the case plan or other basic 
services; 
e.   Denial of visits, telephone or mail contacts with family members, as written in the case 
plan; 
f.   Assignments of extremely physically strenuous exercise or work; 
g.  Isolation in a locked room or in a ny closet or other enclosed space; or 
h.  Isolation in an unlocked room  for more than an hour. 
•  Not punish a child for bed wetting or other  action currently beyond the child’s control; 
•  Not delegate or permit punishment of  a child by any other person; and 
•  Not withhold the child’s allowance for any reason without authorization  from the child’s OCS 
worker.

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: July 2006  Page 6 of 13 	
If separation from others is used  as a behavior control measure, I ag ree to provide it in an unlocked, 
lighted, well ventilated room of at  least 50 square feet and within hearing distance of an adult.  The 
time limit shall be the child’s age minus one minute  for any child under twelve years of age and 60 
minutes or less for any child twelve and over.  For exam ple, a five year old would be restricted for four 
minutes. 
 
HEALTH CARE 
I agree to: 
• Immediately report to the child’s worker or the responsible supervisor se\
rious changes in the 
health of the child; 
•  Report to the child’s  worker or the responsible supervisor  medical or dental care needed by the 
child; 
•  Cooperate with the  agency in the medical and  dental care planning for the child, as written in 
the OCS case plan; 
•  Make and keep medical and dental appointments,  for the child, as needed or required by the 
agency; 
•  Be responsible for keeping immuni zations current for the child; and 
•  Obtain OCS approval prior to obtaining medical services not covered by Medicaid unless a 
medical emergency requires immediate action a nd an OCS worker cannot be reached.  If the 
medical emergency requires an authorized signature , the foster parent is authorized to sign only 
if the OCS worker or biological  parent cannot be located or cannot  get to the medical facility 
quickly enough.  The foster pare nt shall sign the authorization for treatment indicating that 
OCS is the legally responsible party. 
 
For children age 10 and above, foster parents sha ll provide sex education including prevention of 
sexually transmitted diseases and birth control information or shall arrange provision of same from 
qualified teachers, counselors or family planning services in accord ance with the child’s OCS case 
plan and level of understanding. 
 
MEDICATION	
 
I agree to: 
• Only give prescription medication to the child  with a doctor’s prescription or authorization; 
•  Be responsible for making available medicati ons ordered for the child, for storing those 
medications and medical supplies out of reach of  the child, and for dispensing the medications 
in accordance with the prescription directions; 
•  Not change the dosage of the medication without doctor’s orders; 
•  Notify the child’s worker or responsible superv isor within one working day when psychotropic 
medications (medications to control be havior) are prescribed for the child; 
•  Exercise good judgment in providing non-prescr iption medications only when the child 
actually needs them and shall use non-prescrip tion medications only in accordance with the 
directions on the label of medicine;

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: Reissued: April 2009  Replacing: July 2006 Page 7of 13 	
• Report to the child’s worker or  responsible supervisor frequent use of non-prescription 
medication; 
•  Make every effort to learn and to look for poten tial negative side effects of both prescription 
and non-prescription drugs and to  immediately report negative side-effects to a physician and 
to the child’s worker as soon as possible; and 
•  Maintain the child’s medical hist ory and immunization record and to provide the information to 
the foster care worker. 
 
When requested to do so by th e child’s worker, I agree to: 
•  Keep a medication log for the child detailing all  medications given, the date, time, name of the 
child and signature of the person  administering the medication; and 
•  Keep a seizure log including the time of the seiz ure, description of the seizure and what may 
have caused or happened before the seizure. 
 
RELIGIOUS AND ETHNIC HERITAGE	
 
I agree to: 
• Recognize, encourage and support th e religious beliefs, ethnic heritage and language of the 
child and his/her family, as writ ten in the child’s OCS case plan; 
•  Allow the child freedom to express his/her feeli ngs about his/her family, past, current status 
and future; 
•  Arrange transportation to religious services or  ethnic events for a child whose beliefs and 
practices are different from  my own, as written in the child’s OCS case plan; and 
•  Not force or pressure the child to participate  in religious activities or ethnic events against 
his/her will or diffe rent than his own religion and ethnicity. 
 
EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT AND RECREATION	
 
I agree to: 
• Enroll each school age child, during the school y ear, in school within two days of placement 
and to notify the child’s worker if there are re cords or information on the child needed by the 
school; 
•  Cooperate with the agency and  take part in the selection and arrangements for educational 
programs appropriate for the child’s age, abilities and in accordance with the OCS case plan; 
•  Participate in the educational planning for each  child, including the Individual Educational Plan 
(IEP) meetings, act as the surrogate parent when  applicable and work with the school regarding 
adjustment, grades, attendance and educational needs; 
•  Plan with the school personnel wh en there are problems with the child in school and to report 
to the agency any serious situation  which may require agency involvement; 
•  Assist the child who is enrolled in a trai ning program, sheltered employment program or 
employment in the community in meeting his/he r commitments and responsibilities as written 
in the OCS case plan; 
•  Provide opportunities for socializ ation and developmental activities which are appropriate to 
the age and abilities of the child;

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: Reissued: April 2009  Replacing: July 2006 Page 8 of 13 	
• Provide opportunities for the child  to experience age appropriate social activities, appropriate 
physical exercise and intellectual,  spiritual and emotional growth; and 
•  Encourage children age 16 and over who want to  work to seek employment, if it does not 
interfere with the child’s academic performance.   The earned monies will be the property of the 
foster child.  Foster parent shall encourage ch ild to place 20% of the net take home pay, minus 
employment expenses such as the cost of uniform s, into a separate savings account to which the 
child does not have access without a co-signature.   The foster parent shall remind the child to 
report earnings to the foster care  worker on a quarterly basis. 
  STANDARD PROVISIONS	
 
 
This agreement is subject to and conditioned upon the  availability and appropriation of Federal and/or 
State funds. 
 
Payments for days of service will be made to th e foster parent in the month following the service 
delivery. 
 
OCS reserves the right to recoup amount of overpayment made to the fo ster parent in error or as a 
result of inappropriate billing by th e foster parent either for services not rendered or rendered to an 
ineligible child.  In accordance with agency proce dures, overpayments will be recouped within 60 days 
in the entire amount to overpaid unless the foster  parent contacts OCS and makes arrangements for the 
repayment to be paid in installments not to exceed twelve months. 
 
Foster parents may receive separate reimbursement ove r and above the rate for child specific expenses 
defined in the Foster Care Policy manual with  appropriate OCS approval.  These reimbursable 
expenses include qualifying activities, educational a nd incidentals.  Proper receipts must be presented 
upon billing.  The foster parent requests re imbursement by submitting an OCS Form 435, Foster 
Parent’s Supplementary Expenditure Affidavit, each  month.  Receipts must show the items purchased, 
date, amount and should be signed by  the seller or otherwise have the name of the vendor printed on 
the receipt.  Separate receipts are needed for  each child.  The OCS worker reviews the OCS Form 435 
and receipts.  Receipts submitted three months past the date of purchase will not be honored. 
 
Foster parents, as mandated reporters,  shall	
 report any instances of suspected abuse and/or neglect 
immediately to the local OCS Child Protection Unit,  in accordance with Article 609 of the Louisiana 
Children’s Code, and to the OCS foster care worker.   Foster parents shall cooperate in any ensuing 
child protection investigation. 
 
INDEMNIFICATION CLAUSE	
 
 
The State agrees to defend and indemnify a foster  parent(s) against any claim, demand, suit, compliant, 
or petition seeking damages filed in any court ove r alleged negligence or other act by the foster 
parent(s), including any demand under any federal statute, when the act that forms the basis of the 
cause of action took place while the individual was enga ged in the performance of the duties of a foster 
parent pursuant to an agreement with  the Department of Social Services and

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: Reissued: April 2009  Replacing: July 2006 Page 9 of 13 	
the Department of Social Services has determined, af ter an investigation, that the foster parent(s) is 
free from criminal conduct and that the act that fo rms the basis of the cause of action was not done 
intentionally or with  gross negligence. 
 
This defense and indemnification clause does not appl y to personal injury or property damage to the 
foster parent or any household member of the foster parent’s home, nor to the home itself. 
 
The foster parent agrees to cooperate fully with  the State of Louisiana and Department of Social 
Services in regard to any claim or  potential claim.  The foster parent(s) also agrees to notify the 
Department of Social Services immediately upon the receipt or knowledge of any demand, suit or 
claim of any person.  The foster  parent(s) agrees not to make any  statements concerning the facts 
surrounding the incident without the consent  of the Department of Social Services. 
 
The foster parent(s) agrees not to  make any settlement agreement, payment, or arrangement of any 
kind concerning any claim or damage without wr itten permission of the State of Louisiana, 
Department of Social Services.  The indemnificati on provisions of this agreement do not apply to any 
settlement agreement, payment, or arrangement of  any kind concerning any claim or damage and made 
without the written permission of  the State of Louisiana, Department of Social Services. 
 
The agreement to defend and indemnify the foster pa rent shall not in any way impair, limit, or modify 
the rights and obligations of any insu rer under any policy of insurance, or impair the right of the foster 
parent(s) to obtain private counsel on  his own behalf at his own expense. 
 
The Department of Social Services shall be additio nally obligated to indemnify a foster parent(s) for 
attorney fees and all costs so incurred if the Depart ment of Social Services previously determined not 
to assume the defense of a foster parent(s), and a  court later finds the foster parent(s) was engaged in 
the performance of the duties of a foster parent a nd that the foster parent was free from criminal 
conduct or that the act that forms the basis of the  cause of action was not done intentionally or with 
gross negligence.  To be entitled to payment, any su ch demand must contain therein a certified copy of 
the final judgment reflecting the  exoneration of the foster parent and an itemized accounting of the 
attorney fees and costs due.  The at torney fees shall be payable at a rate no greater than one and one-
fourth times the maximum rate authorized and paid  by the Office of Risk Management for counsel to 
defend the state in damage claims. 
 
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE AGENCY	
 
 
OCS is responsible for: 
• Developing the OCS case plan and visitation plan for each child with input from the child, if 
age appropriate, the biological  parents, foster parents and significant other persons or 
organizations involved in servi ng the child and his family; and 
•  Payment of previously approved me dical services, which are not required in an emergency, that 
are not covered by Medicaid for the children in placem ent.  Foster parents are to list OCS as the 
legal and financial responsibl e party for medical services.

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: Reissued: April 2009  Replacing: July 2006 Page 10 of 13 	
OCS shall: 
• Provide foster parents information from agency  records concerning the child and the child’s 
parents which is necessary for the foster parents  to carry out their responsibilities to the agency 
and to provide for the care a nd development of the child; and 
•  Reimburse for authorized expenses in a timely and equitable manner. 
 
OCS will: 
• Encourage the participation of the  foster parent in the program of services to the child.  In all 
instances possible, the foster parent will be en couraged to participate in the development and 
implementation of the treatment plan for the child; 
•  Ensure that the foster parent is notified timely  of Family Team Conferences and court hearings; 
•  Observe confidentiality regarding information c ontained in the foster parent case record; 
•  Notify the foster parent of the  results of evaluations and monito ring of the program of services; 
and 
•  Provide or identify in-service  training opportunities and support services to increase foster 
parent skills and abilit ies to be successful. 
 
OCS may assist with special transportation needs of the foster child. 
 
OCS will pay the foster parent a regular daily  board rate according to the following amounts: 
 
 
For a child up to age two years: 
$313.77 – room and board 
      61.50 – diapers and formula 
      61.50 – clothing 
        9.72 – child’s monthly allowance 
      15.37 – personal items 
        5.54 – gift allowance 
_____________________ 
  $467.40 = average monthly payment ($15.58 per day) 
 
For a child age two through five years: 
$314.76 – room and board 
    61.50 – clothing 
      9.93 – child’s monthly allowance 
    15.38 – personal items 
      5.53 – gift allowance 
_____________________ 
$407.10 = average monthly payment ($13.57 per day)

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: Reissued: April 2009  Replacing: July 2006 Page 11 of 13 	
For a child six years through age twelve years: 
    $324.76 – room and board 
        73.80 – clothing 
        29.62 – child’s monthly allowance 
        15.37 – personal items 
          5.54 – gift allowance 
  ______________________ 
    $448.80 = average monthly payment ($14.96 per day) 
 
   
                      For  a child age thirteen years of age or older: 
    $351.31 – room and board 
        80.38 – clothing 
        46.70 – child’s monthly allowance 
        16.33 – personal items 
         6.28 – gift allowance 
  ______________________ 
    $501.00 = average monthly payment ($16.70 per day) 
 
 
Foster parents may care for children of  foster children.  If the infant of a foster child is in foster care 
custody, the regular foster care board rate shall be  paid.  The rate for non-OCS custody children of 
foster children/mothers will be $264.00 per month.   For non-IV-E certified mothers, this rate is 
reduced by the amount of the Family Independence  Temporary Assistance Program (FITAP, formerly 
AFDC) payment.  The special board compensation is  for the foster parent’s use for the care of the 
foster child/mother and her child, an d should not be given directly to the foster child/mother.  As long 
as the infant/child remains in  the mother’s custody, the monthl y payment shall remain $264.00 
(including FITAP payment amounts  as described above).  Pre-placement planning with the OCS 
worker and foster child/mother should address servic es that may be required for the non-custody infant 
and how the foster parent(s) will specifically assist  the foster child/mother in meeting those needs. 
 
When in the opinion of the agency, a family foster home fails to meet agency requirements to the 
extent it poses a threat to the safety and welfare of the child in the home, the agency shall promptly 
remove any child in placement pendi ng further action.  Otherwise, a planned move shall be made for 
the child.  OCS will give the foster parent at least  seven days notice before removing the child from the 
home unless this is impractical.

OCS Form 427 
Foster Care Agreement 
Reissued: Reissued: April 2009  Replacing: July 2006 Page 12 of 13 	
 
 
SIGNATURES OF AGREEMENT 
 
I certify by my signature below that my Home Deve lopment/Provider Worker and I have discussed the 
preceding agency minimum requirements concerning th e professional and child care responsibilities 
expected of a foster or adoptive  parent and the agency, and if applicable, the responsibilities and 
requirements expected in the attached Supplement ___.    I acknowledge that I have received a copy of 
the Foster Parent Bill of Rights a nd Foster Parent Handbook.  I also agree to fulfill the expectations as 
a prepared and certified fost er parent.  I understand that failure to fu lfill these responsibilities can result 
in corrective action and possible de-certification of my home.  I unders tand a child specific placement 
agreement will be provided when a child is placed in my home. 
 
  _________________________________         ____________________ 
  Foster or Adoptive Mother                                     Date 
 
 _________________________________   ____________________ 
  Foster or Adoptive Father                      Date 
 
 _________________________________   ____________________ 
  Home Development Worker                     Date 
 
 _________________________________   ____________________ 
  Provider Representative                     Date

OCS Form 427 
   Foster Care Agreement 
                                                                                                                                                                                       Reissued: April 2009 
   Replacing: July 2006 
   Page 13 of 13 
                                                                    	
Annual Signing Sheet for Foster/Adoptive Pa rent Recertification for OCS Form 427 
(And if Applicable, Supplemental Sheet) 
 
Recertification Date Period:  __________________  Renewal Date: ___________________ 
 
I certify by my signature below that my Ho me Development/Provider worker and I have 
discussed the OCS Form 427 with Agency mini mum requirements concerning the professional 
and child care responsibilities expe cted of a foster or adoptive parent and the agency, and if 
applicable, the responsibilities and requirements expected in  the attached Supplement ___.  I 
agree to fulfill the expectations as  a prepared and certified foster parent.  I understand that failure 
to fulfill these responsib ilities can result in corrective action and possi ble de-certification of my 
home.  I understand a child specific placement agr eement will be provided when a child is placed 
in my home. 
 
 _______________________________   ____________________ 
 Foster or Adoptive Mother     Date 
 _______________________________   ____________________ 
 Foster or Adoptive Father     Date 
 _______________________________   ____________________ 
 Home Development Worker     Date 
 _______________________________   ____________________ 
 Provider Representative     Date 
 
Recertification Date Period: __________________ Renewal Date:       _____________________ 
 
I certify by my signature below that my Home  Development/Provider worker and I have 
discussed the OCS Form 427 with Agency mini mum requirements concerning the professional 
and child care responsib ilities expected of a foster or adopt ive parent and the agency, and if 
applicable, the responsib ilities and requirements expected in  the attached Supplement ___ .  I 
agree to fulfill the expectations as  a prepared and certified foster parent.  I understand that failure 
to fulfill these responsibilities can  result in corrective action and possible de-certification of my 
home.  I understand a child specific placement agreem ent will be provided when a child is placed 
in my home. 
  
           ________________________________      ______________________ 
 Foster or Adoptive Mother     Date 
 ________________________________   ______________________ 
 Foster or Adoptive Father     Date 
 ________________________________   ______________________ 
 Home Development Worker     Date 
 ________________________________   ______________________ 
 Provider Representative     Date

OCS Form  435 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Revised:  March 2009 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Replacing:  August 2007 
 
                                                                    	
CAREGIVER’S SUPPLEMENTARY EXPENDITURE AFFIDAVIT 	 
Name of Caregiver: 
 
Caregiver TIPS Number:     
Name of Child:   
 
Child TIPS Number: 
DATE: 
 
From: 
To: 
 
Transportation (Include Only Travel Approved by OCS) 	
Odometer Reading 	Date 
Destination and Purpose of Travel 
Departure Arrival Miles Travel or Fare* 
Amount 	
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
                                                                                                                                 TOTAL  _______  x  ______ 
 
If approved travel is by bus, train, plane, taxi, etc., enter the amount of fare. 
Educational Expenses*  Medical* Clothing* Other  Incidental Needs* 
    
    
    
    
TOTAL 
COSTS     
 
     	
    	
Retainer Home Visitation - 
Date(s) of Visit(s): 
     
*Receipts must be attached for each expenditure with child’s name, store name, clerk’s name or number and amount.  The receipts  are to be itemized. 
   Receipts over 90 days will not be paid or reimbursed.  
**Purchases of clothing and other incidental  needs for which you are requesting reimbursement require prior approval from the Off ice of Community Services.   
I certify that these expenses were made by the above-named, that the child has 
received the benefits from them and that the prices of purchases are no higher 
than prices for the same quality of goods and services at other places where I 
could reasonably trade. 	Caregiver Signature  Date

CHILD-SPECIFIC IN-SERVICE TRAINING CREDIT   
CONSULTATION PROVIDED TO FOSTER PARENT(S) 	
 
Foster Parent Name:       
  Social Security #:            
Foster Parent Name:       
 Social Security #:            
Address:       
 
Identifying Information On Child For Whom Consultation Was Scheduled: 
Name:      	 	TIPS #:                                                           
 	
Total Consultation Time to be Credited:              Hours               Minutes 
 
Inclusive Dates with Time to be Credited for Each Day: 
 
  1.  Date: _____________________  Total Time: _________ Hours     _______ Minutes 
  2.  Date: _____________________  Total Time: _________ Hours     _______ Minutes 
  3.  Date: _____________________  Total Time: _________ Hours     _______ Minutes 
  4.  Date: _____________________  Total Time: _________ Hours     _______ Minutes 
 
Check Type of Professional Consul
tation Provided to Foster Parent: 
 	
 Behavior Management/Disciple      	 Separation and Attachment 	
 Post-Traumatic/Victi mization Issues     	 Educational 	
 Other: (Please specify) _____________________________________________\
_______________ 	
 
Provider Name:       
 
Agency and/or Credentials:        
 
Address:        
 
Telephone #:       
 
Provider Signature:       
 	
Date:	 	
 
RETURN TO:  OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
    HOME DEVELOPMENT UNIT OR REGIONAL TRAINING COORDINATOR 
                                 
                            ADDRESS:          	
 	
 
APPROVED BY: ______________________________________________________ 
 
 
TITLE: ___________________________________    DATE: ____________________________

OCS Form HDU 5                              Page 1 of 7   
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: April 2000            
Foster/Adoptive Home:                                                                                            	 Date:                                           
Geographical Address:                                                                                                                                                    	
 	 	
STANDARDS 	YES  NO	 	COMMENTS & REQUIRED PLANS	 	
I.  EXTERIOR HOME ELEMENTS  	         	 	 	
A..   Home/area is in reasonably safe         
condition, in good repair and free from 
objects, materials, and conditions which may 
be of danger to children placed in the home .  	           	
B. Home is comparable in appearance and 
maintenance to other family homes in the 
community. 	   	
CC.   The home has a safe outdoor play area either 
on the property or within a reasonable distance 
from the property which children may use. 	  	 	
D.   Play equipment on the property is in a safe 
condition, is well constructed, and is suitable 
for children.   	   	
E.    Swimming and wading pools are locked and 
inaccessible to children except when the 
children are closely supervised. 	   	
F.  There is a required plan to protect the   
       children when a pond, creek, or other area         
of water runs through or near the property. 
       Briefly state plan. 	   	
II.  INTERIOR HOME ELEMENTS  	   	 	 	
A.    The kitchen contains a working and sanitary 
       stove, oven, refrigerator, and sink.   	   	
B .   There are a sufficient number of dishes for 
       each household member to have his own 
       dish at mealtime.  	   	
C.   There is an indoor di ning area, for eating, 
       and is furnished so that members of the         
household can eat together.              	    
 
 	
DD.
  The house has a living or family area which is 
comfortably furnished with seating space for 
family members.  This area is not a bedroom 
and is accessible to family members. 	    
 	
EE.  
The family permits no more than three (3) 
children to share a bedroom.

OCS Form HDU 5                              Page 2 of 7   
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: April 2000            	
STANDARDS 	YES  NO	 	COMMENTS & REQUIRED PLANS	 	
F.  Each bedroom which is to be occupied by a   
foster child has at least 75 square feet for one 
child with an additional 55 square feet for each 
additional child. Provide information for 
        each bedroom numbered 1 through 6. 
        
 
   
           Dimensions     # Children     Bed Type        Name 
#1                                                                                          
#2                                                                                          
#3                                                                                          
#4                                                                                          
#5                                                                                          
#6                                                                                           
G.    Each child has his own bed and each                   
infant has his own crib.  Each bed is no               
shorter than the child’s height and no less           
than 30 inches wide.      
H.
   Each bed has a clean, comfortable, non-              
toxic mattress with a waterproof cover.     
I.
    The parent(s) do not permit children over            
the age of six (6) years to share a bedroom          
with a child of the opposite sex.     
J.
    The parent(s) do not permit children, other         
than infants under six (6) months of age, to         
share a bedroom with an adult.   The only           
exception is when the child needs close              
supervision due to illness or with the                   
approval of the FC/Adopt Worker/Sup.     
K.
   Each bedroom has a window to provide              
sufficient natural light and ventilation.     
L    
Each bedroom has attached working doors.     
M.  A minimum of one (1) set of bed linens,             
blankets and a pillow has been provided   
 
       for each child.    
N.
  Each child has been provided a chest, dresser, 
or other adequate storage space in the child’s 
bedroom for clothing and personal belongings.  
There is a designated space for hanging up the 
child’s clothes in or near the child’s bedroom.      
OO.
   The child is allowed to decorate, to some 
degree, his or her bedroom which allows for the 
expression of personal tastes.    
 
P.   The home has, in good condition, a minimum 
of one (1) flush toilet, one (1) wash basin with 
running water, and one (1) bath or shower with 
hot and cold water.

OCS Form HDU 5           
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: April 2000	
            	
Page 3 of 7	
QQ.  Each bathroom is equipped with toilet paper, 
towels, soap, and other items necessary and 
required for personal hygiene and grooming.     
III.
  SANITATION AND HEALTH  	 	 	 	
A.   The home is kept clean and free of hazards         
to the health, safety, and physical well 
       being of the family.     
B.
   The parent(s) state, & visual inspection               
shows, they have appropriate connection to        
 a sewerage system or septic tank..     
CC.
   The home has a con tinuous supply of clean 
drinking water from a city water system,  or the 
local health authority tested and approved the 
private water supply.     
DD.   The parent(s) serve Grade A Pasteurized milk 
to the children.      
.  Plumbing in the home is in working order.  
   
F.  The parent(s) state the home has an adequate 
supply of hot water for bathing and 
dishwashing.  Hot water accessible to children 
is not to exceed 120 Fahrenheit at the faucet.     
 
IV.  GENERAL SAFETY   	 	 	 	
A.   The home is well-heated and well-                      
ventilated.     
 
B.   Windows and doors used for outside              
ventilation have screens.     
C.
  There is a functioning telephone in the 
       home.       
D. 
a.  The parent(s) have ensured the safe storage 
of drugs, poisons, and/or other harmful 
materials.  
     b.  There is a plan for the storage of these   
materials.    
           
E.         Depending on the type, the parent(s) keep 
alcoholic beverages in a place not 
accessible to children or in the back of the 
refrigerator.        
F.
         Measures are taken to keep the home and 
premises free of rodents and insects .     
G. 
a.  The parent(s) restrict children’s access to 
potentially dangerous animals. 
       b.  There is a plan for restricting the             child’s access to these animals.

FOSTER and/or ADOPTIVE HOME EVALUATION for 
ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH, AND FIRE SAFETY  	
OCS Form HDU 5           
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: April 2000	
            	
Page 4 of 7	
HH.  All pets are curren t on the required 
immunizations.  
       (If more pets,        	
 ( Τ) here and list on back of 
form.)    	
Name:                                               Date of Shot: 
Name:                                               Date of Shot: 
Name:                                               Date of Shot: 
Name:                                               Date of Shot: 	
I.
  Exotic animals have the required permits.    	Name:                                              Permit Date: 
Type of Animal: 	
J.     Pets at home have not been involved                   
in any incidents of biting individuals.      
KK.
  Firearms are unloaded and stored separately       
from ammunition in locked places/cabinets 
 which make them inaccessible to children.     
L.
 The parent(s) have household first aid                 
supplies for treating minor cuts, burns, and  
other minor injuries.      
V. FIRE SAFETY	  	 	 	 	
A.
   The home is free from apparent fire hazards, 
such as faulty electri c cords and appliances.     
B.  The home is equipped with operating smoke 
alarms within ten (10)  feet of each bedroom.      
C.
 An operating portable chemical fire 
extinguisher is located in the cooking area of 
the home.      
D.   a. The parent(s) have an established emergency 
evacuation plan                                                 
b. A copy of the floor plan of the home is 
provided with arrows  noting the evacuation 
route which is attached to the HDU-5.     
E.   If home has an upper floor(s), there is a safe        
accessible means of escape from the floor(s) 
*and it is documented in the home and it is 
documented in the home study and on the 
evacuation plan.      
F. The parent(s) states 
they practice using the 
evacuation plan at least quarterly with the 
children to assure the children understand the 
procedures.      
G    The parent (s) state all combustible items are 
stored away from sources of heat.      
H  .  The parent(s) states all home heating units         
and other hot surfaces are shielded against          
accidental contact.

FOSTER and/or ADOPTIVE HOME EVALUATION for 
ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH, AND FIRE SAFETY  	
OCS Form HDU 5           
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: April 2000	
            	
Page 5 of 7	
I.   Electric space heaters are to be positioned 
      away from combustible objects and 
      supervised re: children.     
J.
    The parent(s) states solid fuel (not                        
electric) heating stoves, systems, and        
fireplaces are in safe co ndition with proper   
installation, maintenance, and operation.     
K.
   The home with fuel heated stoves, heating 
       systems, fireplaces, etc. has a carbon 
       monoxide detector.     
L.
  Homes including mobile homes have             
two (2) doors which provide unrestricted 
        exits in case of fires or an apartment has two 
        (2) unrestricted exits and one (1) may be a 
        window.     
VI.  Transportation Safety
 	 	 	 	
A.   The parent(s) provide a safe means of                 
transportation adequate to meet  the needs           
of the family. The vehicle has enough seat          	
belts & seating space, within the legal                 
requirements, for everyone who will travel         
in the vehicle.     	
B.
  The parent(s)/primary person transporting the 
children are properly licensed to operate a 
vehicle according to state law.    	Name:                                           Expiration Date: 
Name:                                           Expiration Date: 
Name:                                           Expiration Date: 
Name:                                           Expiration Date: 	
C.
   The parent(s) certify that any vehicle which 
transports a foster ch ild carries automotive 
insurance as required by Louisiana law. 
      
  # of Autos Owned:                 
       Type: 1 _______________                                  
                 2 _______________                                   
                 3	
 _____________                            	
 
    	
Car 1  Name of Insurance Co: 
Policy #:                           Effect Date:                   Expire Date: 
Inspec. Stick Expire Date:                        Lic.Tag Expire Date: 
 
Car 2  Name of Insurance Co: 
Policy #:                           Effect Date:                   Expire Date: 
Inspec. Stick Expire Date:                        Lic.Tag Expire Date:  
 
Car 3  Name of Insurance Co: 
Policy #:                           Effect Date:                   Expire Date: 
Inspec. Stick Expire Date:                        Lic.Tag Expire Date:	
 	
D. 
Seat belts, child restraints, and car seats are 
used as required by Louisiana law and as 
appropriate for the child’s age.

FOSTER and/or ADOPTIVE HOME EVALUATION for 
ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH, AND FIRE SAFETY  	
OCS Form HDU 5           
Reissued: April 2009 
Replacing: April 2000	
            	
Page 6 of 7	
 
E.  A foster child will not be permitted to operate a 
vehicle without a valid Louisiana license or 
learner’s permit and the written authorization o	
f 
the agency or a court order .    
 
 
 	
F. The parent (s) certify that any vehicle which a 
foster child is permitted to drive carries 
sufficient automotive liability insurance (min. 
$300,000) which covers the child’s use of the 
vehicle .

OCS Form HDU 5           
Reissued :April 2009  
Replacing: April 2000	
            	
Page 7 of 7	
 
 
 
I, ____________________________________, certify by my signature below that my Home 
Development Worker and I have discussed the licensing/agency minimum requirements.   I understand I 
am in compliance with those requirements which were answered with a yes.  When a requirement(s) is 
not met and answered with a no, I agree to make the necessary changes as agreed upon with my Home 
Development Worker.   I understand the necessary cha nges to correct the unmet requirements are to be 
stated in the attached  corrective action plan.    
 
                                                                        \
    	
            ________________________________	              
FOSTER/ADOPTIVE PARENT                             FOSTER/ADOPTIVE PARENT  
                              
                                                      	
                       ________________________________	               
DATE                   DATE           
 
As the assigned Home Development Worker, I ac knowledge that I have surveyed the home and 
discussed the licensi ng/agency minimum requirements  with the above individual(s). 
      
                                                             	
           	_______________________	  
HOME DEVELOPMENT WORKER              DATE

OCS Form HDU 5           
Reissued :April 2009  
Replacing: April 2000	
            	
Page 7 of 7	
CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN 
 	
I agree to make the necessary corrections by the agreed upon date, as described in the following  plan, in order to meet the 
Agency's minimum requirements for foster/adoptive homes.	
 
 
 	
ITEM NOT IN    CORRECTIVE ACTION        DATE TO BE 	         	DATE	  	
COMPLIANCE         AGREEMENT                       COMPLETED       REVIEWED	 	
(Be specific and concise)	 	
1.     
     
     
  	Date Completed & 
Worker Initials:	  	
  	 	 	
2.  
  
     
     
  	Date Completed & 
Worker Initials:	  	
  
  
3.     
     
     
  	Date Completed & 
Worker Initials:	  	
  
  
4.     
     
  	Date Completed & 
Worker Initials:	  	
  
  
5.     
     
  	Date Completed & 
Worker Initials	  	
 
_____________________________________                    _______________\
___________________________ 
Foster/Adoptive Mother                      Date              
        Foster/Adoptive Father                            Date 
 
 ______________________________________                                 \
                                                     
Home Development Worker               Date

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
FOSTER/ADOPTIVE HOME RE-C ERTIFICATION FORM 604 II 
 	
OCS 604 II    
Reissued:  April 2009 
Replacing: April 2005 
Page 1 of5           	
Foster/Adoptive Parent Re-certification Renewal Date:                                    
Parent Name:         Parish:       
Street Address:         City:       Zip Code:       
Mailing Address:         City:       Zip Code:       
Telephone #:Day:         Evening:       Other:       
 
A.   Current Family Information 
 
1. Household Composition:  Please complete for each person (fost er child, family members, etc.) currently living in your 
home. 
FULL NAME  DOB  SEX 
M/F  Relationship To
 
Foster Parent(s)  School
 Attending or  
Employer   Grade
 
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
 
2
  . Placements:    List other foster children who have lived in your home during the past year:  
NAME   
SEX
M/F  
Date of 
Placement/Removal   
REASON CHILD WAS REMOVED AND  
Worker=s Name 
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
 
B.  List your family recreational activities :      _________________________________________________ 	 
________________________________________________________________________\
_______________________ 
 
C .  Have any family members experienced physical/mental health problems during the past year?  
 	
 Yes  	 No If yes, please explain       _____________________________________________________	 
 
D.  What forms of discipline do you use with th e foster child that is placed in your home?      __________
 
________________________________________________________________________\
______________

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
FOSTER/ADOPTIVE HOME RE-C ERTIFICATION FORM 604 II 
 	
OCS 604 II    
Reissued:  April 2009 
Replacing: April 2005 
Page 2 of5            	
E. In-Service Training : 
 
Attached is a print out of all training sessions that have been  entered for you beginning July 1.  Please verify if the print 
out is correct and add any add itional training you attended below: 
Title of Training  Location Was it 
helpful? 	
Number 
 of  
Hours	
 Month 
and
 
Year  	
Certificate  
of 
Training  	
             	 Yes  
 No    	
 Yes   
 No
 	
             	 Yes  
 No    	
 Yes   
 No
 	
             	 Yes  
 No    	
 Yes   
 No
 	
             	 Yes  
 No    	
 Yes   
 No
 	
Total Training Hours Not Included On Attached Print Out:       	
 
1. Have you completed all your required training hours from July
 1st of last year through June 30th of this year?   	
Yes  	 No  If no, please state your plans for getting the required hours:      ____________________________	 
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
 
2. If you did not get your required training hours, please explain.       ____________________________________
 
_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 
3. Are there any subjects or training you would like to see presented in the training sessions?        ______________
 
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
 
F.   Employment and Income : 	
 
Household Monthly Income $     	
          Other Income $      	             Monthly Expenses $      	         	
 
Foster/Adoptive Mother: 
Place of Employment:     :  Telephone #       
Full Time 	 Yes 	No Part Time 	 Yes 	 No Work Hours (Mon-Sun)        	
Shift Changes or Other Work Arrangements? Explain:             
Will your employer allow you to miss work when the child is sick, to take the child to visits, attend FTC, attend appointments,  
etc? 	
 Yes  	 No If no, explain your plan for childcare and involvement in fulfilling parental duties.            	
 
Comments:

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
FOSTER/ADOPTIVE HOME RE-C ERTIFICATION FORM 604 II 
 	
OCS 604 II    
Reissued:  April 2009 
Replacing: April 2005 
Page 3 of5            	
Foster/Adoptive Father: 
Place of Employment:         Telephone #       
Full Time 	 Yes 	 No Part Time 	 Yes 	 No  Work Hours (Mon-Sun)        	
Shift Changes or Other Work Arrangements? Explain:             
Will your employer allow you to miss work when the child is sick, to take the child to visits, attend FTC, attend appointments,  etc? 	
 Yes  	 No If no, explain your plan for childcare and involvement in fulfilling parental duties.            	
 
Comments:      
 
G.   Child Care 
 
List the people that you can call on to care for your child(ren) wh en and if the need arises (for example, family, other foster parents, 
neighbors, other): 
NAME ADDRESS  TELEPHONE # RELATIONSHIP 
                         
                         
                         
 
Children younger than 12 years placed  in foster care must not be left alone in the home at any time.  
Please explain your plans for childcare below. 
 
1.Who will see the child(ren) off in the mo rning?  e.g., Fix breakfast, get dressed?     ________________________	
 
______________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
2. Who will be home when the child(ren) arrives from school?       _______________________________________
 
______________________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
3. Who will provide care for the child(ren) during school  holidays (e.g., Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas),  
and/or  when you are away from home for several days (e.g., attend personal conferen ce, visit relatives, attend 
funerals)? 
     _________________________________________________________________________________________
 
______________________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
4. Who will care for the child(ren) on weekends when (if) you work?       __________________________________
 
______________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
5. Who will provide care for the child(ren) during the summer?        ______________________________________
 
______________________________________________________________________________________________

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
FOSTER/ADOPTIVE HOME RE-C ERTIFICATION FORM 604 II 
 	
OCS 604 II    
Reissued:  April 2009 
Replacing: April 2005 
Page 4 of5            	
H.  Parenting the foster child(ren) in your home:  (Check all that apply) 
 	
  I do not use physical punishment. 
  I maintain contact with my foster children’ s school and participate in school plan/needs. 
  I am careful of the child(ren)’s right to privacy and confidentiality. 
  I try to give any foster child(ren) a chan ce to settle down when they come to my home. 
  I help my foster child(ren) work on their "Life Books". 
  I help prepare and encourage the child(ren ) for visits with their birth parents. 
  I maintain medical and school records/inform ation to give to the child’s OCS worker. 
  I try to be positive about the child(ren)’s family and their future. 
  I am supportive of the birth parents. 
  I provide opportunities and encouragement for the ch ild(ren) to talk privately with me about their 
problems. 
  I keep information on the child(ren) to give to their birth parents. 
  I participate in school conferences a nd/or I work with school personnel. 
  I participate in family focused assessments/evalua tion and/or treatment for the child when requested. 
  I have difficulty handling my foster child(ren)'s behavior.  Please explain       ________________	 
                           ____________________________________________________________________________ 	
 	
COMMENTS       _____________________________________________________________________	 
______________________________________________________________________________________
 	
 
I.  Relationship with the Agency: 
 
Please check the comments about the agency worker(s)  actions in order that we may better assist you: 
All Some  None  	
 	 	 1.  The worker(s) notifies and includes me in conferences regarding planning for the 
child(ren) in my home. 	
 	 	  2.  The worker(s) returns telephone calls in a timely manner. 	
 	 	 3.  The worker(s) visits my home on a regular basis. 	
 	 	 4.  The worker(s) will assist me when I n eed help getting services for the child(ren) in 
my home. 	
 	 	  5.  The worker(s) is helpful in giving sugg estions for dealing with problem behaviors. 	
 	 	 6.  I feel comfortable talking to my worker(s) about the child(ren) in my home. 	
 	 	 7.  The worker(s) regularly notifies me of court hearings. 	
 	 	 8.  I am provided the work and home telephone numbers of each worker and their 
supervisor. 	
 	 	 9.  The worker(s) provides me with adequate  information on the behavior of children 
placed in my home. 	
 	 	  10. I am included and treated as a team member. 	
 	 	 11. Payment forms are handled promptly.

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
FOSTER/ADOPTIVE HOME RE-C ERTIFICATION FORM 604 II 
 	
OCS 604 II    
Reissued:  April 2009 
Replacing: April 2005 
Page 5 of5            	
J.   Parental Views : 
 
1.  I am aware that the Office of Community Services need s homes for children of all races and ethnic groups.  I 
have considered the prospect of parenting children of all races and ethnic groups.  I feel I can parent children of the 
following races and ethnicity: (please check all you feel you can parent) 
 
Race: 	
 African-American 	 White 	 American Indian/Alaskan Native	 Asian  
 	
 Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 	 Other, Explain:       	 
 	
 	
Ethnicity : 	Hispanic or Latino  
 
2.  I feel my relationship/experience with the agency is: 	
 Excellent 	 Satisfactory 	Unsatisfactory 
Please explain.        _________________________________________________________________________	
 
___________________________________________________________________________________________
 	
 
3.  What can the agency do to help yo u with the foster children in your home?      ____________________	 
_____________________________________________________________________________________ 	
________________________________________________________________________\
______ 
________________________________________________________________________\
______ 
________________________________________________________________________\
______ 
________________________________________________________________________\
______ 
 
 
 
 
   
 FOSTER MOTHER SIGNATURE         
  DATE 	
 	
 
 
FOSTER FATHER SIGNATURE       DATE

TR N -7  
    Revised: June 2007 
Replacing:  June 1991            
TRN-7 
WORKSHOP/CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE FORM 
FOR FOSTER PARENTS AND SERVICE PROVIDERS   
SESSION INFORMATION	:  Complete for every workshop or conf erence attended.   (Please print.)	 	
Workshop Title	:       
 	
Date(s):        Total Hours:       
Location (City, State):             
 
Conference Name:       
WORKSHOP PRESENTER INFORMATION	: (Information on the presenter(s) and their organization.)	 	
Presenter(s):       
 
Organization:       
 
Address:       
  Phone:       
ATTENDEE INFORMATION	: (Complete information on the lines below.)	 	
Print Name (Last, First) 
Signature  Social Sec. Number  Please print your full address 	(If 
you are a service provider, enter the name 
of the agency you represent as well.)	
 	
     
 
 
BRIEFLY DESCRIBE THE WORKSHOP CONTENT BELO W INDICATING: FOCUS, KEY POINTS, ETC. 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
________________________________________________________________________\
_____ 
 
PLEASE ATTACH AN EVALUATION FORM, COPIES OF HANDOUTS AND NOTES FROM WORKSHOP.  
FORWARD THIS FORM WITH ATTACHED INFO RMATION TO THE HOME DEVELOPMENT UNIT.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix J. Louisiana Foster Parent Bill of Rights 
Section No./Name Appendix J. Louisiana Foster Parent Bill of Rights 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  December 2007 
Replacing November 2006 	
 	
Page 87 	 	
 
APPENDIX I
 
 
REFERENCES  
 
American Red Cross. Parenting: Your child from  one to six, Parent Guide.  Garden City, N.Y.: 
  Doubleday and Company, 1981. 
 
Fahlberg MD, Vera I.  A child’s journey through  placement.  Indianapolis, IN: Perspective Press, 1991. 
 
Keck, Gregory and Regina Kupecky. Parenting the hur t child: Helping adoptive (foster) families heal 
  and grow.  Pinon Press, 2002. 
 
Keefer, Betsy and Jayne Schooler. Telling the trut h to your adopted and foster child. Greenwood 
 Publishing Group, 2000.

Agency Name Office of Community Services (OCS) 
Chapter No./Name Foster Parent Handbook 
Part No./Name Appendix J. Louisiana Foster Parent Bill of Rights 
Section No./Name Appendix J. Louisiana Foster Parent Bill of Rights 	
 
Dates Issue/Reissued  December 2007 
Replacing November 2006 	
 
 	
Page 88 	
 
 
APPENDIX J 
 
LOUISIANA FOSTER PARENT BILL OF RIGHTs 
 
Foster parents are recognized as primary caregivers  to abused and neglected children who have been 
removed from their homes of origin.  The State of L ouisiana and the Department of Social Services shall 
implement and promote the support of these rights  through the policy and practice of the Department. 
 
Foster Parents are entitled to the following rights: 
 	
1.  The right to be treated with dignity, respect, trust,  and consideration as a primary provider of foster care 	
and a member to the professional team caring for foster  children. *This right includes the right to uniform 
treatment throughout the state by the Department in the providing of information to foster parents and in 
ensuring the exercise of the rights granted to foster parents.** 
2.   The right to receive explanation and clarification as to  the expectations and roles of all team members; 
and to receive evaluation and feedback on their role of  foster care giver. *Information provided to foster 
parents by the Department shall include written information explaining the rights and duties of foster 
parents, and a record shall be kept by the Depart ment showing the signatures of the foster parents 
acknowledging receipt of this information.** 
3.   The right to receive all information on a child, at pl acement, and on an ongoing basis, that could impact 
the care provided the child and/or the health and safety of the child and/or foster family members.  
Information shall include case plan, health/medical, e ducational, court/legal decisions, and social history 
as known to the Department, to better meet  the needs of children in their care. 
4.   The right to receive the necessary  training and support to enable them to provide quality services in 
meeting the needs of children in their care, including  reasonable relief and respite, as allowed by agency 
resources. 
5.   The right to be informed of available support servi ces, case planning meetings, court hearings and other 
decision-making meetings in a timely manner in recogn ition of the importance of their role as foster care 
givers. *This includes information concerning participation as foster caregivers in legal and 
administrative actions as authorized by law.** 
6.   The right to actively participate in the developmen t of the child’s case plan, educational plan, and in 
other service planning decision-making processes. 
7.   The right to access agency staff for assistance in d ealing with emergencies on a 24 hour basis; to 
assistance in dealing with family loss and separa tion when a child leaves their home; and access to 
available advocacy services to help support the foster parent in their role as care giver. 
8.   The right to receive information concerning agency  policies and procedures related to their role as a 
foster parent or to the child in their care, and/or  information contained in the foster parents’ record, as 
allowed by law. 
9.   The right for first consideration as a placement for a child previously placed in their home and/or for a 
child placed in their home who becomes available for  adoption, if relative placement is not available. 
10.  The right to permit a member of the Louisiana Advocacy Support Team to accompany a foster parent 
into meetings with departmental staff duri ng investigations or grievance procedures.
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